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Helge Sverre:
Database migrations in PHP with Phinx
Jul 04, 2016 @ 11:14:55

Helge Sverre has put together an introduction of a tool perfect for anyone that's been looking for a framework-agnostic way to handle database migrations: Phinx.

Phinx is a database migration tool written by Rob Morgan in PHP, what that means is that you can tell Phinx that you want to create a new database table, add a column or edit the properties of a column by writing “migrations”.

You can then run this migration using the Phinx tool and it will connect to your database with the configuration that you specified and perform the database updates for you automatically.

He then walks you through a full introduction to the tool, breaking it down into sections:

  • Getting Phinx installed (via Composer)
  • Configuring it via a YAML file
  • Writing your first simple migrations
  • Creating database seeders (including the use of Faker data)
  • Rolling back your migrations

All of these topics come with plenty of code, configuration and output examples, helping you ensure you're on the right track.

tagged: database migration phinx library introduction faker tutorial

Link: https://helgesverre.com/blog/database-migrations-in-php-with-phinx/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Disco with Design Patterns: A Fresh Look at Dependency Injection
Jul 01, 2016 @ 11:26:44

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a tutorial posted giving you a "fresh look at dependency injection" using the Disco library from bitExpert.

Dependency Injection is all about code reusability. It’s a design pattern aiming to make high-level code reusable, by separating the object creation / configuration from usage.

[...] Our very own Alejandro Gervasio has explained the DI concept fantastically, and Fabien Potencier also covered it in a series. There’s one drawback to this pattern, though: when the number of dependencies grows, many objects need to be created/configured before being passed into the dependent objects. [...] In this article, we’ll demonstrate the concept [of a dependency injection container] further with a newcomer in this field: Disco.

He starts with the installation of the library via Composer and starting up the built-in PHP web server for testing. With that up and running he shows you how to create an instance of the container and set up a sample service with the configuration in the docblock comments. The tutorial then talks about the service scopes, container parameters and shows it in action to create a simple controller handling frontend. There's a bit more about configuration, the container builder functionality and the creation of a response listener when routes are requested.

tagged: tutorial disco designpattern dependency injection di library

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/disco-with-frameworks-and-design-patterns-a-fresh-look-at-dependency-injection/

Laravel News:
Laravel and Elasticsearch
Jun 16, 2016 @ 09:08:22

The Laravel News site has posted a quick guide for those wanting to use ElasticSearch along with their Laravel applications. The post lists several libraries and resources that can help you get started quickly.

Elasticsearch allows you to search & analyze data in real time. Even though it’s extremely powerful working with delta’s and querying data is not that simple.

If you are using Laravel here is a list of packages and tutorials to help you easily integrate this into your app.

The packages include Plastic and Spatie Searchindex while the tutorials cover things like installing ElasticSearch on Homestead and integrating it with your application.

tagged: laravel elasticsearch integration tutorial library package links

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/06/laravel-and-elasticsearch/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Phinx – the Migration Library You Never Knew You Needed
Jun 02, 2016 @ 13:15:36

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial about the migration library you never knew you needed for your PHP applications - Phinx (for database migrations).

You’re building an application, and you need to share the database’s structure with your team. After all, you want everyone to be up and running as soon as possible. What do you do? SQL dumps of table structures? You could… but that’s so very primitive – and can be time consuming to import, too! More often than not, database migrations are the answer.

In this tutorial, we’ll go through a framework-agnostic package for building and executing database migrations called Phinx.

He starts by helping you get the tool installed via Composer and initializing your environment for migrations and seeds. He covers the configuration of the tool via a simple YAML file and the creation of first migration files based on an existing table structure. He walks through the code involved to create the tables, add indexes and foreign keys. He shows how to run the migrations, gives an example of the error output and modifying the current database structure.

tagged: migration phinx library tutorial agnostic introduction

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/phinx-the-migration-library-you-never-knew-you-needed/

Freek Van der Herten:
Getting package statistics from Packagist
May 23, 2016 @ 10:18:07

In a post to his site Freek Van der Herten shows you how to gather information from the Packagist website about the number of times that your packages have been downloaded.

At my work I’m currently creating a new dashboard. That’s a fancy term for an html page sprinkled with some Vue magic that will be displayed on tv screen at the wall of our office. I won’t say much about the dashboard itself on this post, but I’ll make sure to write something on that in the near future.

One of the things I want to display on our dashboard is how many times our packages get downloaded (yeah it’s a vanity project, sorry about that :-)). To make this real easy our intern Jolita and I cooked up a new package called packagist-api. It uses the packagist api to fetch data about published packages.

They include an example of the package in use, fetching the list of packages for the "spatie" vendor and getting the details by package name. The results include more information than just the download count as well (including current version, maintainers and the basic description). The post ends with an example of filtering out the downloads counts and putting them into a collection for later use.

tagged: package statistics packagist library results tutorial

Link: https://murze.be/2016/05/getting-package-statistics-packagist/

QaFoo Blog:
When to Abstract?
May 18, 2016 @ 10:12:18

On the QaFoo blog they've posted an article that shares some of their thoughts on "when to abstract" in your code - essentially finding that point where abstracting out functionality makes sense.

One of the most difficult challenges in a developers life is finding the "right" abstraction, or at least the best one given the current circumstances. The core problem is that abstraction is a bet on the future development of the software and we know that future is volatile. The circumstances will change, so will the view on the best abstraction change.

But there is another dimension which influences this decision: What kind of software are you developing?

They start off by defining three different types of projects (internal, library and adaptable) and move into how this type changes when/how you abstract things in your code. They give a brief summary for each type and when it usually makes sense, including steps to take (concrete first, then abstract).

tagged: abstract code library internal adaptable type opinion concrete

Link: https://qafoo.com/blog/084_when_to_abstract.html

Symfony Finland:
GraphQL with PHP and the Symfony Framework
May 16, 2016 @ 12:19:09

The Symfony Finland site has a recent post giving an overview of GraphQL and Symfony, combing the GraphQL query language (RESTish handling) from Facebook with your application.

The origins of GraphQL stem from the needs that Facebook's mobile applications had (and continue to have). They needed a data-fetching API that was flexible enough to describe all the different kinds of data that the social network had available. [...] Back in September 2015 GraphQL was already powering Billions of API calls a day at Facebook. [...] The core idea of GraphQL is to send a simple string to the server. This string is then interpreted by the server and it sends back a JSON payload that responds to follows the structure of the query itself.

The post includes an example of what the request and response from a GraphQL query might look like for a social network's data. They also link to several PHP libraries that have come up around the functionality making it easier to integrate. There's also links to some Symfony bundles that provide functionality to make your own GraphQL servers.

tagged: graphql symfony bundle introduction facebook rest query json library

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/graphql-with-php-and-the-symfony-framework

/Dev/Hell Podcast:
Episode 76: No, YOU'RE a Tool
May 10, 2016 @ 11:23:15

The /Dev/Hell podcast, hosted by PHP community members Chris Hartjes and Ed Finkler, has posted its latest episode: Episode #76: No, YOU'RE a Tool.

Chris and Ed sit down to talk about their recent travels to conference both near and far and to also discuss what tools and languages they have been using at their day jobs.

Some of the topics mentioned include:

  • Editors like PHPStorm, Nano and Vim
  • Libraries/tools like Vue.js, HTTPie and Docker
  • Languages besides PHP including Javascript and Python

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 of the show. If you enjoy it, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest shows as they're released.

tagged: devhell podcast ep76 tool library chrishartjes edfinkler

Link: http://devhell.info/post/2016-05-08/no-youre-a-tool/

TutsPlus.com:
How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0
Apr 29, 2016 @ 11:21:10

On the TutsPlus.com site they've posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter's OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users' accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren't overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you'll need to get your app working with Twitter's OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you'll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

tagged: twitter authenticate user oauth tutorial library flow

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-authenticate-users-with-twitter-oauth-20--cms-25713

Ben Ramsey:
Introducing Ramsey/UUID
Apr 25, 2016 @ 10:52:14

In a new post to his site Ben Ramsey finally gets around to posting about a library of his that's not only already widely used but has already been around for a few years - his ramsey/uuid library for generating UUIDs.

It seems quite absurd for me to introduce ramsey/uuid, a library that saw its 1.0.0 release on July 19, 2012, and is now at version 3.4.1, having had 35 releases since its first, but what’s even more ludicrous is that I haven’t once blogged about this library. I mention it only in passing in my “Dates Are Hard” post. So, allow me to introduce you to perhaps a familiar face, an old friend, the ramsey/uuid library for PHP.

He starts with some of the original beginnings of the language back when Composer usage was just first taking off. He'd found other UUID implementations in PHP but none that rivaled the features found in library for other languages. He then briefly explains what a UUID is and what the RFC defines them as. He talks about the name change on the package (from the "Rhumsaa" namespace to "Ramsey") and an issue he received where UUIDs were colliding...as well as how he corrected it. He wraps up the post looking at some of what's coming for the library and what kind of improvements he'll be making in v3.4.1 and beyond.

tagged: ramsey uuid library introduction version opensource project rhumsaa improvement

Link: https://benramsey.com/blog/2016/04/ramsey-uuid/