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InfoTuts.com:
Create Login With Google Plus in Your Website With PHP
April 15, 2014 @ 10:20:31

On the InfoTuts.com site they've posted a tutorial showing you how to make a "Log in with Google" button for your application and make it work with a little PHP magic on the backend.

So you want to allow users to login into your website using their gmail credentials? You have seen various websites that allow their users to login in their websites using gmail, facebook, linked in, Microsoft, git hub credentials. It's time to integrate it in your website. We will cover all the login system in our posts one by one and this one is dedicated to create Google Plus login for your website with PHP using OAuth2. Google offers many APIs like Google Maps, translate API, Analytics ApI etc. Today we will use its Google Plus API so lets proceed with our tutorial.

They break the process down into about five steps:

  • Login to Google API Console. Go to APIs and you will have to turn on Google Plus API.
  • Go to APIs and Auth and then under credentials tab. Click on create new client ID as shown below.
  • Now when you will have to enter your website path and the file path (redirect URI) to get your new client ID.
  • Now you have to set Consent screen.
  • In consent screen if you have entered Google Plus page path then you will have to approve connection.

The code for the actual connection is in the last step. It uses Google's PHP client libraries to configure and make the request, fetch the access token and grab the Google+ user's data.

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googleplus login oauth2 client library tutorial

Link: http://www.infotuts.com/login-with-google-plus-in-your-website-php

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introduction to JadePHP
April 10, 2014 @ 10:30:30

Lukas White has posted an introduction to JadePHP to the SitePoint PHP blog today. JadePHP is a port of the popular Jade templating language more often used in Javascript.

There are dozens of templating engines out there, with options such as Smarty, Twig (used in the upcoming version of Drupal) and Blade (the default for Laravel) among the best known - as well as vanilla PHP, of course. [...] One which differs quite significantly from most is Jade, an engine usually associated with Javascript applications - it's supported out-of-the-box by Express for Node.js, for example. It's Jade I'm going to look at in this article; or more specifically the PHP port JadePHP.

He starts by briefly talking about HAML, a markup language that aims to make it easier and cleaner to write well-formatted HTML documents. Jade creates the entire document this way, meaning you could use it even without any templating needs (just outputting normal HTML pages). He shows you how to get started with the code and provides a simple example of a basic HTML page without any template objects to replace.He explains the markup and what each part does before moving on and showing how to add in the dynamic content and logic. He finishes off the tutorial by answering the question "Why use Jade?" touching on some of the good and bad of the templating engine.

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jadephp templating haml markup library tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introduction-jadephp

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Abstract File Systems with Flysystem
April 07, 2014 @ 11:27:59

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial today from Lukas White showing you how to work with abstract file systems that aren't local. In this case, the file system is virtual and living on a remote system.

Reading and writing files is an integral aspect of any programming language, but the underlying implementation can vary enormously. For example, the finer details of writing data to the local filesystem compared to uploading over FTP is very different - yet conceptually, it's very similar. In addition to old warhorses like FTP, online storage is increasingly ubiquitous and inexpensive - with scores of services available such as Dropbox, Amazon's S3 and Rackspace's Cloud Files - but these all use subtly different methods for reading and writing. That's where flysystem comes in.

He shows how to install the flysystem library (via Composer) and a few examples showing how to make connections to:

  • an Amazon S3 instance
  • a Dropbox account
  • SFTP
  • even Memcache

Examples of both reading and writing to this virtual system are also included as well as a few other features like handling visibility, listing files/directories and mounting the remote filesystem locally.

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abstract filesystem flysystem library tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/abstract-file-systems-flysystem

Gary Hockin:
Less is More
April 07, 2014 @ 09:56:36

Gary Hockin has a new post to his site talking about how he's found that less is more when it comes to what to include in your "composer.json". He works through some of his own opinions on the matter and suggests a bit more thought before just including another library.

I have absolutely no doubt this post will be largely disagreed upon by many in the PHP community, but I've had a terrible day and I'm hoping that the process of just getting this off my chest will be therapeutic in some way. [...] So, today I sat down and started writing the tests for our new lightweight SDK that offsets much of the work needed in the delivery of the adverts to workers via a Beanstalk queue. It should have been so easy. Things went well for the early part until I realised that I wanted to be able to extract and serialise our Device object to put it into the queue, and then hydrate it back into a Device object inside the worker

He assumed that since he'd used Zend Framework 2 a good bit and there were no (declared) dependencies, he could directly use an individual component. Unfortunately, there was a dependency (ZendFilterChain), requiring another package to be added via Composer and pulled down. He points out that Composer has made this almost too easy and developers maybe aren't as thoughtful about the libraries they pull in because of it.

He makes a call out to developers to remember the idea behind the MicroPHP Manifesto and really think about the code they're puling in, how large it is and if it's what they really need. He's not suggesting that Composer is the problem, rather the blind usage of it without thinking through the implications.

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less more library composer packagist include

Link: http://blog.hock.in/2014/04/05/less-is-more

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with PHP Extension Development via PHP-CPP
March 27, 2014 @ 12:15:08

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a new tutorial from Taylor Ren showing you how to get started with PHP-CPP for creating PHP extensions. PHP-CPP is a C++ library that makes it simpler (and faster) to create PHP-specific extensions.

In your dealings with PHP, you may come to consider writing a PHP extension yourself. [...] When it comes to choosing a tool to build PHP extensions, we see two different approaches: use more pro-PHP semantics, like Zephir or use more pro-C/C++ semantics, like PHP-CPP, which will be addressed in this article. For me, the main drive to select the second approach is simple: I started my programming hobby with C/C++, so I still feel more comfortable writing those lower level modules in C/C++. PHP-CPP's official site gives a few other reasons to do so.

He walks you through the installation of the library (for now, just a git clone) and getting the needed environment set up to be able to compile and test out the extension. He helps you set up the "skeleton" files for the extension, including some sample content. He includes code for a typical "Hello World" example extension as well as its use in a sample PHP script.

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tutorial extension introduction phpcpp library beginner

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-php-extension-development-via-php-cpp

Brandon Savage:
You don't need a framework
January 09, 2014 @ 09:56:51

In the most recent post to his site Brandon Savage suggests that choosing and using a framework for you application isn't even needed.

Looking through the list of PHP frameworks can be daunting. Zend Framework. Laravel. Cake. Symfony. Picking one and learning it can seem like the most important design decision you'll make. And yet, picking a framework is actually one of the least important decisions you face. In fact, you don't need a framework at all.

He starts with a brief history of (PHP) frameworks and talks about their evolution from a set of common libraries out to the full stack versions we have today. He moves on to the "PSR and Composer era" where the lines started to blur a bit. With the renewed emphasis on packages in an easy to install method, frameworks started to become less important.

Now, instead of having a bunch of siloed frameworks that can't work together, there are (supposedly) standards for how they can integrate. An added bonus is that library creators can follow the same standards, making their libraries compatible with all the frameworks that implement the PSR standards.

You can read a rebuttal to this post from Anna Filina on her site.

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framework need library package composer psr opinion

Link: http://www.brandonsavage.net/you-dont-need-a-framework

Jeremy Kendall:
PHP Password Hashing A Dead Simple Implementation
January 08, 2014 @ 11:48:23

In this recent post to his site Jeremy Kendall shares some of his thoughts about password hashing and a new library he's written to help make it simpler - event with an existing password hashing method in place.

We all know to encrypt passwords for highest level of security. Unfortunately, too many do it [the wrong way]. While there was never any excuse for getting it that wrong, there's now no excuse for getting it wrong at all. Developers, meet the new(-ish) PHP password hashing functions (and the userland implementation password-compat).

He shows how to use this password hashing correctly with the "default" hash and how to store that in the database. His Password Validator library aims to help make this even simpler and adds in other features like rehashing and upgrading of legacy passwords. The remainder of the post shows how to use the library for these functions and how to persist them in the tool's storage decorator and interface functionality.

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password hashing implementation validator opensource library

Link: http://jeremykendall.net/2014/01/04/php-password-hashing-a-dead-simple-implementation/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Imagick vs GD
November 28, 2013 @ 18:16:34

In a new post to the SitePoint PHP blog Jacek Barecki has written up a comparison of two of the most widely used PHP image manipulation libraries - Imagick and GD.

If you want to create a thumbnail, apply a filter to an image or transform it in any other way, you will have to employ an image processing library in your PHP application. It means that you will probably choose GD or ImageMagick. But which one supports a wider range of image formats? Maybe one of them is slower than the other? What other criteria should be taken under consideration when choosing the right library?

He compares them on a few different aspects:

  • Availability
  • Supported file types
  • Functionality
  • Performance
  • Coding style
  • Popularity

He also provides three alternatives to using GD or Imagick, most involving outside services or software.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
imagick gd image manipulation library tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/imagick-vs-gd/

Thomas Weinert:
Building A Sensor Phalanx With PHP
November 18, 2013 @ 09:15:12

Thomas Weinert continues his series looking at merging the physical and virtual using PHP to with messages coming from servers and how to build it into a sensor phalanx.

Sensors are fun. They report from the physical world into the digital. But getting the signal into php is only the first part, you will have to get them out again. This post shows how to get data from analog sensors pushed to the browser. It uses Carica Chip, if you haven't read my previous blog post you should do it first.

He talks about the use of ReactPHP in the Carica library and the addition of Ratchet to help with the websocket messaging. He sets up two simple servers - one HTTP, the other websocket - to handle the reporting and interaction with the sensor. He includes the code for the HTTP server and uses his example code to make the phalanx listening on 8081. Some other code is included to make the listeners and the simple UI for the charts. A video is included showing it all in action, reacting to a moving light.

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sensor phalanx tutorial carica chip library reactphp ratchet

Link: http://www.a-basketful-of-papayas.net/2013/11/building-sensor-phalanx-with-php.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introduction to Redbean
October 08, 2013 @ 12:54:31

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new post introducing you to Redbean, a n ORM that can help you quickly prototype out applications that has a few tricks up its sleeve.

When it comes to RAD and prototyping, there are lots of tools available to help get projects up-and-running quickly. From quick-starts to micro-frameworks, from build tools such as Composer to one-click installers, and of course ORMs - there are all sorts of ways to speed up development time. I'm going to look at Redbean, an ORM with a difference, which is ideal for prototyping. Redbean is an ORM (Object Relational Mapper), but it does more than that - it creates and modifies the underlying schema on-the-fly.

He walks you through the installation of the library (well, links to this page on their site) and shows you how to "dispense" your first "bean" object. There's also some examples of saving objects, creating new ones and searching using the "load" method. Any good ORM also includes the ability to define relations, and Readbean is no exception - examples of this are also included. There's also a quick bit at the end about making models and querying the database directly with a SQL string.

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introduction readbean orm library tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introduction-redbean/


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