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Tomas Votruba:
How to Turn Mocks from Nightmare to Solid Kiss Tests
Jun 13, 2018 @ 12:36:48

In a new post to his site Tomas Votruba shows you how to make your unit test mocks better with an easier and clearer way to use them. This simplification makes use of something PHP itself is already able to do: create anonymous classes.

At the time being, there is only 1 post about anonymous classes in tests (thanks to Matthieu!). Compared to that, there are many PHP tool made just for mocking: Prophecy, Mockery, PHPUnit native mocks, Mockista and so on. If you're a developer who uses one of them, knows that he needs to add proper annotations to make autocomplete work, has the PHPStom plugin that fixes bugs in this autocomplete and it works well for you, just stop reading.

This post is for developers who struggle with mocking and have a feeling, that they're doing something wrong.

He starts with an example of a test that creates a mock for an external request to the Heroku service using PHPUnit's mocking tools. He points out that this requires extra knowledge of the mocking methods and functionality to accomplish, potentially making it difficult to understand for those new to the tool. He then shares a refactor of the same test, this time making use of an anonymous class to mock out the needed findByCategoryId method and return a response. He ends the post pointing out that, as a side effect of this refactoring (and other interface refactoring) you'll create more SOLID code and it can help make it easier to maintain in the future.

tagged: tutorial mock unittest test anonymous class tool

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2018/06/11/how-to-turn-mocks-from-nightmare-to-solid-kiss-tests/

Matthias Noback:
Combing legacy code string by string
Apr 18, 2018 @ 09:15:59

In a new post to his site Matthias Noback takes a look at legacy applications and two things that most of them seem to have in common: classes that are too large and too generic methods. In this post he discusses these two topics and some of the tactics you can use to help refactor and resolve them.

I find it very curious that legacy (PHP) code often has the following characteristics:
  • Classes with the name of a central domain concept have grown too large.
  • Methods in these classes have become very generic.

He starts by tackling the "classes too large" problem, suggesting that it's usually just a matter of developers slowly adding to existing functionality rather than introducing large chunks of code all at once. Moving on to the "generic methods" issue, he lays out a common scenario showing how a method evolves over time to repurpose it for other uses thank its original intent. He recommends "taking a step back" and picking apart the code to make the functionality more specific in the places it's used.

tagged: legacy application generic method large class tutorial

Link: https://matthiasnoback.nl/2018/04/combing-legacy-code-string-by-string/

Robert Basic:
Mockery partial mocks
Feb 05, 2018 @ 11:18:08

Robert Basic has a quick post to his site where he shows how to use partial mocks in Mockery, a useful tool for unit testing in PHP applications.

In dealing with legacy code I often come across some class that extends a big base abstract class, and the methods of that class call methods on that big base abstract class that do an awful lot of things. I myself have written such classes and methods in the past. Live and learn.

One of the biggest problems with this kind of code is that it is pretty hard to test. The methods from the base class can return other objects, have side effects, do HTTP calls…

He gives an example of a model that includes a method returning a database connection. In the child class of this the method that he's wanting to test includes a call to this method, making it difficult to test in isolation. He then shows how to make a partial mock of the child class that, be definition, returns a mocked PDO instance instead of the real PDO instance. All other methods will be passed through to the real class.

tagged: mockery unittest partial mock class abstract tutorial

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/mockery-partial-mocks/

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 4)
Jan 23, 2018 @ 10:21:14

Mark Baker has returned with a new part of his series looking at the use of anonymous classes and closures as an alternative to the typical test mocking functionality. In this latest part (part four) he talks more about the "SpyMaster" class created in the previous article and how it can be refactored to provide the spies with a "mission".

In a prior article in this series, I described the use of a SpyMaster Class to create proxy spies as anonymous classes, that allow external visibility (and potentially update) of protected and private properties within an object. The same basic principle of a spy can also be used to create a proxy that gives us access to execute the private and protected methods of an object.

[...] Unlike the original SpyMaster that I wrote about last July, we’re going to take a slightly different approach here, providing our spies with a “mission”.

He first shares the code for the old class and covers why it was useful. He then moves on to the refactor, showing how it defines the "mission" (what to mock) and an "invoker" that helps with the actual execution. He gives an example of this new class in use, performing an "infiltration" on a sample object and calling previously protected methods directly.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part4 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2018/01/23/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-4/

TutsPlus.com:
How to Send Emails in Laravel
Jan 05, 2018 @ 12:25:33

The TutsPlus.com site has posted a tutorial for the Laravel users out there showing you how to send emails with built-in functionality via the framework's Mail API.

In this article, we're going to explore the Mail API in the Laravel web framework. Laravel takes advantage of the popular SwiftMailer library, which is easy to use and comes with a variety of email drivers to choose from. In the latter stages of the article, we'll go through an in-depth demonstration of the concepts discussed in the first half of the article.

The tutorial starts with the setup and configuration you'll need to get the mail system up and running. They don't help you set up the backend (like sendmail or Mailgun) but they do describe the options in the configuration required for methods like SMTP sending and local sending. Next they show an example of a "mailable" class that creates a "demo" email and defines various settings including the "from" address, the content (from a view), variables to pass to the view and an image attachment. The view for the example is also included, making use of the Blade templating to replace placeholders with variable values.

tagged: email laravel tutorial mailable class example

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-send-emails-in-laravel--cms-30046

Mark Baker:
Extending final Classes and Methods by manipulating the AST
Nov 20, 2017 @ 10:38:32

Mark Baker has an interesting post to his site where he shares a suggestion for making it easier to create unit tests for some of the more difficult parts of your unit tests. In the article he shows how to extend final classes and methods by manipulating the AST (abstract syntax tree structure) of the current code under test.

We know that we should always write unit tests for our code, and mock dependencies; but that isn’t always easy when we need to mock classes define as final, or that contain final methods. This isn’t normally a problem when we’re only working with classes within our own libraries and applications, because we control whether they are final or not, and we can type-hint these dependencies to interfaces. However, when the dependencies that we use are from external libraries, we lose that control; and it can become harder to test our own classes if we do need to mock final classes and they haven’t been built to interfaces.

He talks about how one tool, Mockery, allows some of this with its functionality but can still cause issues when mocks are passed instead of actual class instances. He then starts on a solution he has been trying to implement - a mocking library that makes use of the PHP_Parser package to make it possible to modify the structure of the code itself, not just put a wrapper (mock) around it. He includes a bit of code showing how to use that and the BetterReflection library to do some class introspection, locate files for testing and how to the tool to "de-finalize" a class (make it no longer "final").

tagged: extend class method manipulate ast testing unittest final mockery tutorial

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/11/19/extending-final-classes-and-methods-by-manipulating-the-ast/

Exakat Blog:
Make everything private in your PHP classes
Oct 06, 2017 @ 09:25:25

In a new post to the Exakat blog they propose an interesting idea: making everything private in your PHP classes with the basic idea being that you can more easily move from a place with more control (private) to less control (protected/public).

It is a good recommendation to make everything private in a class : constants, methods, properties. With private, comes a tighter control on the element : no one from outside may use it, limiting the unwanted impact on the object. Of course, some of the class has to be accessible from the outside, or the object may only be manipulated as a token.

[...] Eventually, when the code matures, it becomes desirable to apply the above principle of encapsulation. This helps keeps the code clean and made of independent components. This is the beginning of a long hunt.

They show how the results look for an Exakat scan of a class and go through each of the results touching on class constants, methods and properties. It also catches when a class property is a "constant" and not modified - or able to be modified - by any means. The post ends with a recommendation to "update your code with your brain" based on the interpretation of the results.

tagged: private visibility class exakat scan results recommendation

Link: https://www.exakat.io/make-everything-private-php-classes/

Jen Segers:
Goodbye controllers, hello request handlers
Sep 26, 2017 @ 11:12:21

In a post to his site Jen Segers says "goodby to controllers" in favor of request handlers. Request handlers are a concept similar to the ideas in the ADR pattern but are defined a bit differently.

If you have worked on large applications before, you might have noticed that you end up with bloated controllers sooner or later. Even if you use repositories or service classes to extract logic from the controller, the amount of dependencies, methods and lines of code will grow over time.

Let me introduce you to request handlers. The concept is very simple, yet very unknown to a lot of PHP developers. A request handler is basically a controller, but limited to one single action.

He suggests using invokable classes to build out request handlers in your PHP code, making use if the magic __invoke method to make them callable. He gives a "hello world" kind of example and talks about how Laravel and Slim already implement this idea in their routing. He then looks at how these responders help you adhere to the Single Responsibility Principle (part of SOLID) and how they make the code easier to test and simpler to refactor.

tagged: controller request handler invokable class example tutorial

Link: https://jenssegers.com/85/goodbye-controllers-hello-request-handlers

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 3)
Sep 19, 2017 @ 11:58:39

Mark Baker has posted the third part of his series looking at an alternative way to handle mocking in the tests for your PHP application. In this latest part of the series he shows how to modify one of PHPUnit's own mocking examples to use an anonymous class.

I have heard people say that you shouldn’t test abstract classes or traits, only the concrete classes that implement or use them. I don’t follow that approach: unit testing is all about testing in isolation from anything that might affect those tests. Testing a concrete class that implements an abstract one, or uses a trait, means that the abstract class or trait is no longer fully isolated, but is being tested within the scope of the whole of that concrete class. We should still always test concrete classes as well; but we should also test the abstract classes and traits as individual units.

So just how do we test something that cannot be instantiated on its own?

He shares one tactic that some developers use - a class designed only for testing - but suggests that this "pollutes" the codebase. Instead he shows how to replace mocking for traits and abstract classes with an anonymous class that's more "disposable". He also shows how to modify this approach to handle calling protected methods in the class the anonymous class extends.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part3 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/09/18/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-3/

Martin Hujer:
Don't Use Entities in Symfony Forms. Use Custom Data Objects Instead
Aug 28, 2017 @ 10:53:14

In this post to his site Martin Hujer suggests that you don't use entities directly in your Symfony forms, opting instead for custom functionality to persist form data.

Let's start with stating that using entities for validation in Symfony Forms is widely used and widely recommend approach. Even the official documentation suggests it.

And I don't think it is a good idea! Why? [Three reasons:] an entity should be always valid, change [in the future and] layers separation.

For each of these downfalls he gets into a bit of detail about what the issue is and introduces the alternative: a custom data class. This class is then used to represent the data in the form with some simple assertions. He includes an example of this kind of class with three properties: title, content and public date. He then shows how to build a form using this class and how to handle updates, not just creates, with the same functionality.

tagged: tutorial entity symfony form data persistence custom class

Link: https://blog.martinhujer.cz/symfony-forms-with-request-objects/