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TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 3
Dec 01, 2016 @ 11:15:35

TutsPlus.com has continued their series covering object-oriented development practices in WordPress (plugins) with this third tutorial. In previous parts they set up the environment and introduced some of the basic concepts of OOP programming and getting the first classes and files defined.

In the last tutorial, we reviewed the original state of our autoloader and then went through a process of object-oriented analysis and design. The purpose of doing this is so that we can tie together everything that we've covered in this series and the introductory series.

Secondly, the purpose of doing this in its own tutorial is so we can spend the rest of this time walking through our class, seeing how each part fits together, implementing it in our plugin, and then seeing how applying object-oriented programming and the single responsibility principle can lead to a more focused, maintainable solution.

They start with a brief review of what they've covered so far and begin to build on the changes suggested in the previous part of the series. They've already broken it down into the different functional classes (according to the single-responsibility principle) and take the next step of including them and calling some example code to prove all is working as expected.

tagged: oop wordpress tutorial series objectoriented programming plugin part3

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-3--cms-27515

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 2
Nov 30, 2016 @ 09:33:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next tutorial in their "Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress" series - part two - expanding on the basics presented in the previous part of the series.

In the previous tutorial, we covered a handful of concepts, all of which are going to be necessary to fully understand what we're doing in this tutorial. Specifically, we covered the following topics: object-oriented interfaces, the single responsibility principle, how these look in PHP [and] where we're headed with our plugin.

[...] Ultimately, we won't be writing much code in this tutorial, but we'll be writing some. It is, however, a practical tutorial in that we're performing object-oriented analysis and design. This is a necessary phase for many large-scale projects (and something that should happen for small-scale projects).

First they briefly cover the environment you'll need to follow along (already set up if you followed along with part one). They then get back into the code, evaluating the current state of the custom autoloader and investigating how it can be broken down into a class and a set of methods instead of procedural code. They work through the different functional parts of the autoloader and how to break it down into classes with only one job (the "single responsibility principle"). They end up with the autoloader that uses NamespaceValidator, FileInvestigator and FileRegistry instances to get the job done.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part2 series refactor singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-2--cms-27431

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 1
Nov 18, 2016 @ 13:57:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at autoloading in WordPress plugins. In this latest post the most from just the namespacing and setup into the actual code - creating some simple object-oriented classes that can be easily autoloaded.

I recently wrapped up a series in which I covered namespaces and autoloading in WordPress. If you're not familiar with either of the above terms, then I recommend checking out the series. [...] While working on the series, specifically that of the autoloader, I couldn't help but recognize a number of code smells that were being introduced as I was sharing the code with you.

This isn't to say the autoloader is bad or that it doesn't work. If you've downloaded the plugin, run it, or followed along and written your own autoloader, then you know that it does in fact work. But in a series that focuses on namespaces—something that's part and parcel of object-oriented programming—I couldn't help but feel uncomfortable leaving the autoloader in its final state at the end of the series.

They move away from just autoloading and namespacing quickly and move into OOP concepts like interfaces, implementing them, the "single-responsibility principle" and a few other helpful principles. They define the goals for the work ahead and move into the code, updating the current state of the plugin to use these new ideas.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part1 series interface singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-1--cms-27381

Freek Lijten:
Final, private, a reaction
Jun 21, 2016 @ 10:39:37

In response to a few other posts about the use of "final" in PHP development, Freek Lijten has posted some of his own thoughts and some of the things he came to realize about its use in his own development.

I read a blog by Brandon Savage a couple of weeks ago and it triggered some thoughts. He refers to a blog by Marco Pivetta which basically states "Final all the things!". Brandon comes back with a more mild opinion where he offers the notion that this approach might be overkill. Since both posts got me thinking I tried to organise my thoughts on this in the following post.

Freek talks about a pretty common trend in the PHP world: the very rare use of "final". He suggests that "extension" of classes is a bad idea (or at least should be used a lot less) and how he has seen it commonly misused. He then shares two reasons why he thinks "final" is a good idea, mostly centering around how easy it is and how the Open/Closed principle applies. In the end, he notes that he'll be trying to use more "final" in the future and see where it takes him and his code.

tagged: final private reaction development practice class oop openclosed

Link: http://www.freeklijten.nl/2016/06/17/Final-private-a-reaction

Ibuildings Blog:
Programming Guidelines - Part 3: The Life and Death of Objects
Feb 02, 2016 @ 11:42:05

The Ibuildings blog has posted the latest part of their series looking at some general programming guidelines and principles that can help you in your own development work. In this latest article Matthias Noback talks about the "life and death of objects" in more detail including creating, updating and how they "die".

In the first part of this series we looked at ways to reduce the complexity of function bodies. The second part covered several strategies for reducing complexity even more, by getting rid of null in our code. In this article we'll zoom out a bit and look at how to properly organize the lifecycle of our objects, from creating them to changing them, letting them pass away and bringing them back from the dead.

He starts with a brief list of things that are true about objects (they live in memory, they hide implementation, etc) and some of the issues with poor object handling. He then gets into some of the basics: creating objects (meaningful & different ways), validating the input to constructors and methods and changing them to update properties and related objects. He also suggests preferring immutable objects and talks about value objects to help towards this goal. Finally he talks about the death of objects and some of the ways you can possibly "bring them back to life".

tagged: oop object detail introduction validate immutable valueobject revive lifecycle tutorial

Link: https://www.ibuildings.nl/blog/2016/02/programming-guidelines-part-3-the-life-and-death-objects

StarTutorial.com:
PHP Object-Oriented Programming Beginner's Guide
Aug 12, 2015 @ 09:45:14

For those working to move from procedural PHP into a more object-oriented world but may be having some trouble with the transition, the Star Tutorial site has a great beginner OOP in PHP guide you should check out.

They cover all of the basics you'll need to get started with objects in PHP including:

  • classes versus objects
  • visibility
  • inheritance
  • polymorphism
  • interfaces versus abstract classes

Each section is a quick definition and a bit of code to help illustrate the point. This isn't going to be a hand-holding kind of tutorial showing you each step to making an OOP application. Instead, it provides quick, high level summaries of the main OOP concepts to get you on the right road.

tagged: oop object beginner concepts guide tutorial section concepts

Link: http://www.startutorial.com/homes/oo_beginner

Acquia Blog:
Quick Tips for Writing Object Oriented Code in PHP
Jul 13, 2015 @ 10:58:14

On the Acquia blog Adam Weingarten has shared some tips for writing good (and modern) object-oriented code in PHP:

Recently I began working on a D8 module, but this isn't a story about a D8 module. The work I did provided me an opportunity to get back to my pre-Drupal object oriented (OO) roots. Writing OO code in PHP presented some curve balls I wasn’t prepared for. Here are some of the issues I encountered:

His tips touch on things like:

  • Using a code structure that can be autoloaded via PSR-4
  • Namespacing your classes
  • Working with types and type hinting
  • Using docblock comments for autocomplete in IDEs

There's also a few other quick topics he finishes the post out with: the lack of enums in PHP, working with associative arrays, no functional overloading and assigning responsibility to classes.

tagged: oop tips objectoriented code modern psr4 namespace typing docblock missing

Link: https://www.acquia.com/blog/quick-tips-for-writing-object-oriented-code-in-php/09/07/2015/3285651

Scotch.io:
S.O.L.I.D: The First 5 Principles of Object Oriented Design
Mar 19, 2015 @ 10:30:47

On Scotch.io today they've posted a tutorial about SOLID, the "first five principles of object oriented design". SOLID is an acronym made from the first letter of several principles that can help make your OOP code well-architected and easier to test.

S.O.L.I.D is an acronym for the first five object-oriented design(OOD) principles by Robert C. Martin, popularly known as Uncle Bob. These principles, when combined together, make it easy for a programmer to develop software that are easy to maintain and extend. They also make it easy for developers to avoid code smells, easily refactor code, and are also a part of the agile or adaptive software development. Note: this is just a simple “welcome to S.O.L.I.D” article, it simply sheds light on what S.O.L.I.D is.

They start with a basic overview of what the letters in SOLID stand for and then work through each, providing basic code examples to help make the point clearer.

tagged: solid oop design principles introduction objectoriented

Link: https://scotch.io/bar-talk/s-o-l-i-d-the-first-five-principles-of-object-oriented-design

Full Stack Radio:
11: Jeffrey Way - "But how does it feel?"
Mar 10, 2015 @ 10:13:15

On the latest episode of the Full Stack Radio podcast host Adam Wathan sits down with Jeffrey Way of the Laracasts website for an interview.

In this episode, Adam talks with Jeffrey Way of Laracasts about learning, object oriented design, testing, API usability, and whole bunch of other stuff.

You can listen to this interview either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the episode, be sure to subscribe to their feed to get the latest episodes as they're released.

tagged: fullstackradio ep11 jeffreyway laracasts oop testing api usability interview podcast

Link: http://fullstackradio.com/episodes/11/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Practical OOP: Building a Quiz App – Bootstrapping
Nov 14, 2014 @ 13:44:09

The SitePoint PHP blog has kicked off a new series of posts today with the first tutorial about building an application with OOP and the Slim framework. In this starting article they focus in on bootstrapping the application and introducing some of the basics behind MVC and OOP.

At a certain point of my development as a PHP programmer, I was building MVC applications by-the-book, without understanding the ins-and-outs. I did what I was told: fat model, thin controller. Don’t put logic in your views. What I didn’t understand was how to create a cohesive application structure that allowed me to express my business ideas as maintainable code, nor did I understand how to really separate my concerns into tight layers without leaking low-level logic into higher layers. I’d heard about SOLID principles, but applying them to a web app was a mystery. In this series, we’ll build a quiz application using these concepts. We’ll separate the application into layers, allowing us to substitute components: for example, it’ll be a breeze to switch from MongoDB to MySQL, or from a web interface to a command-line interface.

They start off with a bit about why "MVC is not enough" and how they'll be applying domain modeling as a part of the application. There's also a brief mention of the concept of a service layer and how it will fit into the overall structure. Then it's on to the code: getting Slim installed (via Composer) and starting in on the interface/service classes for the Quiz. They walk you through entity creation for the Quiz and Question instances and a mapper to tie them together.

tagged: practical oop tutorial series part1 bootstrap slimframework solid mvc

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/practical-oop-building-quiz-app-bootstrapping/