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Freek Lijten:
Final, private, a reaction
Jun 21, 2016 @ 10:39:37

In response to a few other posts about the use of "final" in PHP development, Freek Lijten has posted some of his own thoughts and some of the things he came to realize about its use in his own development.

I read a blog by Brandon Savage a couple of weeks ago and it triggered some thoughts. He refers to a blog by Marco Pivetta which basically states "Final all the things!". Brandon comes back with a more mild opinion where he offers the notion that this approach might be overkill. Since both posts got me thinking I tried to organise my thoughts on this in the following post.

Freek talks about a pretty common trend in the PHP world: the very rare use of "final". He suggests that "extension" of classes is a bad idea (or at least should be used a lot less) and how he has seen it commonly misused. He then shares two reasons why he thinks "final" is a good idea, mostly centering around how easy it is and how the Open/Closed principle applies. In the end, he notes that he'll be trying to use more "final" in the future and see where it takes him and his code.

tagged: final private reaction development practice class oop openclosed

Link: http://www.freeklijten.nl/2016/06/17/Final-private-a-reaction

DotDev.co:
Test Driven API Development using Laravel, Dingo and JWT with Documentation
Jun 20, 2016 @ 10:15:04

On the DotDev.co site a tutorial has been posted showing the full set up of an API using Laravel, Dingo and JWT tokens while following test-driven development principles along the way.

As the complexity of API’s increase, improving the ways we create them becomes a necessity. Let’s take a journey exploring an efficient way of building well-tested API’s that are easy to develop and maintain by wiring up several different open-source packages.

In this tutorial, we will build a very simple API for fruits that lists all the fruits, shows one fruit, creates a fruit, and finally deletes a fruit. The API will allow anyone to list and show fruits but we will use JWT Authentication to protect creating and deleting operations so only the registered users can use them.

The tutorial starts by helping you get the TDD environment set up for the application and the required libraries installed. From there they install and configure Dingo and look at the role that transformers play in the API output. With a basic API in place the JWT tokens are integrated and another package is used to generate simple, clean API documentation. Full links to other packages, screenshots of the expected output and all the code you'll need is included.

tagged: testdriven development tdd laravel api dingo jwt token tutorial

Link: https://dotdev.co/test-driven-api-development-using-laravel-dingo-and-jwt-with-documentation-ae4014260148#.tccatytip

PHP.net:
PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 1 Released
Jun 14, 2016 @ 10:48:09

The official PHP.net site has officially posted about the latest (alpha) release in the PHP 7.x series: PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 1:

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 1. This release marks the beginning of the first minor release in the PHP 7.x series. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

This is an alpha release and is not meant to be used in production. Features in this release include nullable types, allow specifying keys in list() usage and class constant visibility modifiers. You can see the full list of changes (and bugs fixed) in the NEWS file. As with all non-stable releases, you can get this latest alpha from this downloads page (for source) or the windows QA site (for the Windows binaries).

tagged: php71 alpha release version language preview development

Link: http://php.net/index.php#id2016-06-09-1

Intracto Blog:
How to save a kitten by writing clean code
Jun 03, 2016 @ 12:52:50

On the Intracto blog there's a new post from Joeri Timmermans talking about writing clean code with some good suggestions you can easily incorporate into your current processes.

So you came here to save a kitten? That's wonderful, but the real reason we're both here is to talk about clean code. In this blog post I'll be sharing some of my personal experiences and tips. But before we dive into the tips and tricks part, let's talk about what we, as developers, do and why we do it.

He touches on several topics including:

  • Best vs Fastest
  • Reading vs Writing
  • File and Folder Organization
  • Naming [conventions and clarity]

He also makes the recommendation to "return often", keep things DRY and makes a few recommendations of PHP-specific tools that can help.

tagged: clean code recommendation process development opinion

Link: http://blog.intracto.com/how-to-save-a-kitten-by-writing-clean-code

Laravel News:
A look at what’s coming to Laravel 5.3
Jun 02, 2016 @ 11:48:55

On the Laravel News site there's a post detailing out some of the new things coming to Laravel 5.3 currently still in development but should be released in the near future.

Laravel 5.3 is currently in development and with all new Laravel releases, new features are being teased out as they are added. Here is a quick look at some of these new features.

The list of these new features includes:

  • Eloquent Collections are cleanly serialized and re-pulled by queued jobs
  • Queue console output changed to show the actual class names
  • First Or Create [now takes additional values]
  • Multiple Migration Paths

There's also a mention of the Laravel Echo functionality that makes in-app broadcasting simpler. For some of the topics there's links to other posts with more information too.

tagged: laravel v53 development features list

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/06/look-whats-coming-laravel-5-3/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a SparkPost Client: TDD with PhpUnit and Mockery
May 04, 2016 @ 12:26:32

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've continued their series covering the SparkPost mail delivery service and integrating it in to your application. In this latest part of the series author Christopher Pitt starts looking at the SparkPost API and uses it as a chance to practice some TDD (Test Driven Development) skills.

In a previous post, we looked at SparkPost (as an alternative to Mandrill), and explored a bit of the official PHP client. The official client handles a decent amount of work, but I got to thinking about what it would take to build a new client.

The more I thought about it, the more it made sense. I could learn about the SparkPost API, and practice Test Driven Development at the same time. So, in this post we’ll look to do just that!

He uses a few different libraries to explore the API and its endpoints: Guzzle for the HTTP requests and the Mockery+PHPUnit combination for the testing. He includes the setup and configuration for the testing environment and some sample tests for making sure things are connected. He then integrates Mockery into the testing, using it to mock the Guzzle requests and still have the tests pass even without the actual connection. He then works through several other tests and finishes the post with a mention of building coverage results for the "Client" class.

tagged: sparkpost client tutorial series tdd testdriven development mockery phpunit guzzle api

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-a-sparkpost-client-tdd-with-phpunit-and-mockery/

TutsPlus.com:
Kick-Start WordPress Development With Twig: Timber Image, Menu, and User
May 02, 2016 @ 10:51:47

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at integrating WordPress and Twig with a look at showing images, menus and users in your WordPress UI.

By now you have read about the basic concepts of using Twig through Timber, while building a modular WordPress theme. We've also studied block nesting and multiple inheritance with Twig, based on the DRY principle. Today, we are going to explore how to display attachment images, WordPress menus, and users in a theme with Twig through the Timber plugin.

They go through each of the topics (images, menus and users) and provide the code needed to both gather the data needed and the templates to render the views. This all makes heavy use of the Timber functionality to integrate it with the overall WordPress structure. Screenshots are also included of the resulting output to help you ensure things are working as expected.

tagged: kickstart wordpress development twig timber tutorial series part5

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/kick-start-wordpress-development-with-twig-timber-image-menu-and-user--cms-25750

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Containerized PHP Development Environments with Vagga
Apr 13, 2016 @ 10:19:07

The SitePoint PHP blog recently posted a tutorial showing you how to use Vagga to "containerize" your development environment and help prevent some of the common incompatibility issues that come with setting up/configuring them.

It happens to all of us once in a while. We clone a project, and then we try to run it. However, something doesn’t work. It may be our version of NGINX or Apache. It might be that npm isn’t doing something right. Maybe the project needs an extension, and we don’t have it installed, and now we have to build the extension from source because the dependency does not exist in the repositories for our distribution. No matter the reason, the more complex the setup, the higher the probability of failure.

He sets up a scene where a developer, the primary on a certain product/project is out of the loop and changes need to be made. He steps through the problems another developer could have with setting up a similar environment and, unfortunately, the issues that come from it. Enter Vagga a tool that helps to set up development environments with containers, handle dependencies and run simple processes.

The tutorial then introduces the tool, helps you get it installed and shows how to create a simple environment. Their example uses just Nginx and PHP containers along with mounted volumes, custom configurations and simple command execution to automagically build the environment exactly as needed.

tagged: vagga container development environment docker tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/containerized-php-development-environments-with-vagga/

Ted Blackman:
Lug-Nut Driven Development (LuDDite)
Mar 21, 2016 @ 11:53:27

In his post on his Medium.com site Ted Blackman looks at something he calls "Lug-nut driven development" (or, shortened LuDDite). He breaks it down into a few different suggestions including "build the whole thing badly" out to "automate stop and start".

These are practices that I’ve applauded myself for doing at the beginning of some projects, and kicked myself for not doing early enough in other projects.

The full list suggests things like:

  • Building a system that goes through the whole flow first (not perfect) then come back and refine
  • Testing as you go instead of coming back at the end and retrofitting them
  • Log everything you can then cut back and refine
  • Plan out the error handling before hand to help make it consistent
  • Be able to "stop" and "start" the system easily

While not all of these are specific to web applications there's some definite helpful advice in here, especially to those starting out on new projects.

tagged: lignut development luddite software suggestion practices

Link: https://medium.com/@belisarius222/how-to-start-a-software-project-ad51373c1510#.nfx206q5v

Toptal.com:
The Art of War Applied To Software Development
Feb 19, 2016 @ 11:17:35

On the Toptal blog there's an interesting post where author Jose F. Maldonado takes the infamous book "The Art of War" and applies several principles to programming and development. He obviously doesn't go through the entire Art of War and relates each section, but he does pick out some good bits and makes some interesting parallels.

If you work in the software industry, it’s likely that you have heard about the divide and conquer design paradigm, which basically consists of recursively splitting a problem into two or more sub-problems (divide), until these become simple enough to be solved directly (conquer).

[...] However, the divide and conquer rule is not the only political strategy that can be applied to software development. Although politics and warfare have little to do with software development, just like politicians and generals, developers must lead subordinates, coordinate efforts between teams, find the best strategies to resolve problems, and administer resources. [...] Detailed below, you will a find a brief list of basic tactics and tips explained in the Art of War. They can probably be applied to your job in the software industry, or any of a number of other industries.

Included in his list of Art of War excerpts are topics like:

  • Time Is Crucial In Any Campaign
  • No Leadership, No Results
  • Teamwork And Motivation
  • Thinking Outside The Box

For each topic there's a reference to a chapter/paragraph location in the book, quotes from that section and his own thoughts on how this relates back to software development.

tagged: artofwar software development parallels opinion programming

Link: http://www.toptal.com/agile/art-of-war-software-development