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php[architect]:
October 2014 Issue Released - Built with PHP
October 22, 2014 @ 13:03:49

The php[architect] magazine has officially released their October 2014 edition of their publication: "Built with PHP".

This month's edition includes articles like:

  • "We Built DataSift on PHP" by Michael Heap
  • "Domain Modeling with PHP in Polyglot Systems" by Luis Atencio
  • "Test Fixtures Like a Boss" by Giulio De Donato
  • "Varnish: Just Plain Faster" by Dan Reif
  • "Laravel Tips: Deploying Applications Part 2: Automation" by Dirk Merkel

...and all of your favorite columns from the editors and staff of the magazine. You can pick up a copy for yourself directly from the php[architect] website or grab a full year's subscription (either in digital or print versions....or both).

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phparchitect magazine oct2014 issue release builtwithphp

Link: http://www.phparch.com/magazine/2014-2/october/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Book Review Practical Design Patterns in PHP
October 22, 2014 @ 12:17:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new book review from editor Bruno Skvorc about the "Practical Design Patterns in PHP" book from author Brandon Savage. The review talks both about some of Bruno's impressions of the content in the book and a bit about self-publishing too.

This review of Brandon Savage's Practical Design Patterns in PHP will include my own opinions and impressions about both the book, and the aspect of self-publishing. Many thanks to Brandon for giving me a review copy. "Design patterns are about common solutions to common problems. [...] They are concepts, not blueprints; ideas, not finished designs. [...] They add clarity to an otherwise difficult situation."

Bruno starts off with a look at the actual content of the book: its coverage of each of the patterns (17 in all), ones that he sees as missing and some of his "gripes" with the examples provided. He also talks about Brandon's choice around models being where primary functionality lives. He finishes the post talking about what he calls the "curse of knowledge" (for example, mentioning other advanced topics without knowing of the reader understands them) and the thoughts around self-publishing and some of the issues he has with it.

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bookreview book review designpatterns practical brandonsavage

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/book-review-practical-design-patterns-php/

Symfony Blog:
The Symfony Project turns 9!
October 22, 2014 @ 11:50:14

There's some major news from the Symfony project (with matching post on their blog) worth celebrating - the framework and project are celebrating nine years since the first commits were made by Fabien Potencier himself.

Where does the time go? This milestone reminds us all of how Symfony has become an important part of our professional lives and been changing the way we work with code for almost a decade! (We won't even talk about the whole "we're all getting older" thing!) [...] Over the last several years, the Symfony project has completely and continually reinvented itself. Originally a pure MVC framework with some auto-magical features, now it's both a set of decoupled components and a full-stack Request-Response framework backed by a vast development community.

They also talk some about the Symfony community and include a special thanks to all of the developers that have contributed their talents, both in code and documentation, to the framework over the years.

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symfony framework anniversary celebrate nine years

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/the-symfony-project-turns-9

NetTuts.com:
Securing Your Server Login
October 22, 2014 @ 10:43:27

While PHP developers usually pay more attention to the code level of things, it's good to know something about managing the servers their applications live on too. In this most recent tutorial from NetTuts.com they introduce you to some of the basic things you can do to help secure your server against potential attacks, more specifically around the logins.

Thanks to the growing abundance of useful self-hosted apps such as WordPress and the affordable growth of cloud hosting providers, running your own server is becoming increasingly compelling to a broader audience. But securing these servers properly requires a fairly broad knowledge of Linux system administration; this task is not always suitable for newbies.

They provide a list of seven things to look at (not a comprehensive list, but good none the less) to protect your system logins:

  • Update Your System Components
  • Change Your SSH Port From the Default
  • Activate a Firewall
  • Change Your Root Login Name
  • Activate Google Two-Factor Authentication
  • Switch to Using SSH Keys for Login
  • Manage Your Application Security

Each item includes a summary of the "why" and commands or links to other resources with more information.

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server login security top7 list tips hosting

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/securing-your-server-login--cms-22001

HHVM Blog:
Hack Recent Updates
October 22, 2014 @ 09:37:26

On the HHVM blog today they've posted some updates about the language that helps power the HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine), Hack, and the most recent changes and improvements made to the language.

One thing we haven't talked about much is the progress and evolution of the language itself. We've been busy driving the language forward, improving its PHP base as well as adding new features requested inside and outside Facebook to further increase developers' productivity. But unless you're the sort of person that reads every commit going into the HHVM github repository or every change to our docs site, you probably have no idea about any of these changes since we haven't talked much about them yet.

This post is a "kickoff" of a series of posts they'll be doing covering some of the major changes to the language including:

  • Typechecking new static()
  • First-class enums
  • Better understanding the type signatures of the PHP standard library
  • Covariance

Stay tuned to the blog for the full series.

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hack language update series improvement update

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/6443/hack-recent-updates

Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 10.22.2014
October 22, 2014 @ 08:01:07

Recent releases from the Packagist:
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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Drupal 8 Hooks and the Symfony Event Dispatcher
October 21, 2014 @ 13:14:53

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted today showing the interaction between Drupal 8 hooks and the Symfony dispatcher in the last part of their series showing how to build a custom Drupal 8 module.

With the incorporation of many Symfony components into Drupal in its 8th version, we are seeing a shift away from many Drupalisms towards more modern PHP architectural decisions. For example, the both loved and hated hook system is getting slowly replaced. Plugins and annotations are taking away much of the need for info hooks and the Symfony Event Dispatcher component is replacing some of the invoked hooks. Although they remain strong in Drupal 8, it's very possible that with Drupal 9 (or maybe 10) hooks will be completely removed.

He starts off with a brief introduction to what the event dispatcher is and how it currently interacts with the Drupal 8 system. He uses a simple form example with two text fields and how to hook in the dispatcher to fire a "demo_form.save" event when the user submits the form. He ties this into a DemoEvent and sets up a simple subscriber. He ends the article with a look at using hooks to achieve the same kind of goal.

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drupal8 tutorial hooks event dispatcher symfony component

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/drupal-8-hooks-symfony-event-dispatcher/

NetTuts.com:
Building Advanced Email Features With IMAP and PHP
October 21, 2014 @ 12:19:47

On the NetTuts.com site they've posted a tutorial showing you how to build advanced features with IMAP and PHP. He bases it on the SimplifyEmail project and incldues examples of three different features to get you started.

Analysis of my own email showed I was receiving email from more than 230 automated senders, far fewer actual people. I was tired of constructing filters in Gmail and filling in a myriad of unsubscribe forms. I wanted to have more control over managing my email and simplifying my life. Finally, this past year, I decided to build the features I needed. The result is Simplify Email (SE), a small web app you can host yourself which offers a variety of cool new email features all of which you can check out on the project website. The coolest thing about SE is that it's a platform for reading, analyzing, routing and managing your email - the possibilities abound. Simplify Email is essentially a programmable playground for "hacking" your own email.

His three examples show you how to:

  • Checking your inbox and filter messages
  • Implement a Whitelist challenge to unknown senders
  • Reporting unanswered email

Each of these comes with plenty of code examples, screenshots and output examples (as well as some places where you might need to change some SE configuration values).

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advanced email imap tutorial feature simpleemail filter whitelist reporting

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-advanced-email-features-with-imap-and-php--cms-22059

Anthony Ferrara:
Educate, Don't Mediate
October 21, 2014 @ 11:53:55

In his latest post Anthony Ferarra makes a suggestion about teaching developers how to solve problems via a "quick fix" versus educating them about the real problem: educate, don't mediate.

Recently, there has been a spout of attention about how to deal with eval(base64_decode("blah")); style attacks. A number of posts about "The Dreaded eval(base64_decode()) - And how to protect your site and visitors" have appeared lately. They have been suggesting how to mitigate the attacks. This is downright bad. The problem is that these posts have been suggesting things like "Disable eval()" and "Disable base64_decode()" as possible solutions. And while technically that would work, it completely misses the point, and does nothing to protect users

He suggests that developers shouldn't just look for a "quick fix" solution posted in a tutorial somewhere and go on their merry way. One danger in this is that those instructions could only be patching part of the problem, not all of it. In this case, the disable eval/base64 handling is only a code-level fix. If this exploit exists in your application, the attacker was able to get to the local file system - a much bigger problem.

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educate mediate opinion bugfix quickfix eval base64 encode decode

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/10/educate-dont-mediate.html

Phil Sturgeon:
PHP Wars Attack of the Clones
October 21, 2014 @ 10:18:02

In one of his recent posts Phil Sturgeon talks about what he calls the "Attack of the Clones" on Packagist. In this case, he's referring to the number of packages that all pretty much do the same thing, just in slightly different ways.

n the last article I said I wanted to write about when its a good idea to release a component. A lot of this comes down to: is there one out there that does what I want, and if so, can I use it. This blog post is going to touch on a lot of points already made well by Anthony Ferrera. His article Reinvent The Wheel! says many of the same things, so if you only have time to read one article right now, go and read that. I've been talking with various people on Twitter about how I see a lot of people building what I consider to be clones. [...] It should go without saying that I'm not trying to quash innovation; I just don't think building identical shit over and over again is innovation. I see people wasting their time, and I know that time could go to better use.

He talks about how he's not opposed to innovation and development for the sake of learning, but that often the packages released are lower-powered versions of already established, well-tested packages. These kinds of packages can clutter the results when the packages are searched and prevent developers from finding the best fit for what they need. He mentions frameworks, but doesn't dwell on them as they're a bit more "self-contained" than just packages. He also touches on the curation of packages (guiding people to the right ones) as a possible solution and looks at how some of the other communities out there handle this same problem.

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clones package opinion curation learning innovation community

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/blog/2014/10/php-wars-attack-of-the-clones


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