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SitePoint Web Foundations Blog:
Quick Tip Install Zend Server 7 on an Ubuntu 14.04 Vagrant Box
July 22, 2014 @ 11:14:30

The SitePoint Web Foundations blog has a post from Bruno Skvorc showing how to install Zend Server on Ubuntu 7 set up and configured by Vagrant.

I recently took a look at Zend Server 7, the latest version of the powerful application monitor/manager suite. This quick tip will show you how to get it installed on a Vagrant box so you too can experiment with its features.

The process is made up of four (well, five...one is optional) steps making it pretty easy to try out:

  • Install Prerequisites
  • Clone and Boot
  • Download and Run Installer
  • Fix Log Permissions
  • Deploy an Application (the optional one)

He includes the code updates you'll need to make and some screenshots along the way to be sure you're on the right track.

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zendserver install vagrant ubuntu tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/quick-tip-install-zend-server-7-ubuntu-14-04-vagrant-box/

php[architect]:
July 2014 Issue Released - Navigating the Business
July 22, 2014 @ 10:52:17

The July 2014 edition of php[architect] has officially been published - "Navigating the Business". Articles in this edition include:

  • "Resume 101" by Jordan Tway
  • "Startups and PHP" by Benjamin Greenaway
  • "Hexagonal Architecture with PHP" by Carlos Buenosvinos
  • "The Confident Coder: Sanity Check: Insane Value!" by Aaron Saray

All of the usual columns are also included as well as an "Archie's Adventures" section about the travels of the php[architect] orange elePHPant. You can pick up a (digital) copy of this month's issue directly from the site or get a year's subscription to get more great content delivered each month.

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phparchitect july2014 issue release navigating business magazine

Link: http://www.phparch.com/magazine/2014-2/july/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Best Practices REST API from Scratch - Introduction
July 22, 2014 @ 09:39:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series looking at building up a REST API "from scratch". In this latest post Vita Tardia introduces some of the basic topics and the best practices that are around their use.

The current internet ecosystem has literally been invaded by APIs, and for good reasons. By using third party APIs in your products or services, you have access to a ton of useful features - such as authentication or storage services - that can benefit both you and your users. By exposing your own API, your application becomes "part of the mix" and will be used in ways you've never thought before if you do it the right way, obviously. In this two part series I'll show you how to create a RESTful API layer for your PHP applications, using a collection of real world best practices.

He talks about how a REST API is a "user interface for developers" and the actions the different verbs could take on the same endpoints (PUT, POST, GET, etc). He uses the Slim framework in his examples and helps you get an instance all set up and working. He includes a bit about getting SSL/HTTPS up and running for all requests to the site too. From there he gets into the bootstrapping of the application and the first version of controller handling. He also includes code examples touching on JSON handling, authentication and good error handling.

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tutorial rest api introduction slimframework bestpractices

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/best-practices-rest-api-scratch-introduction/

Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 07.22.2014
July 22, 2014 @ 08:06:19

Recent releases from the Packagist:
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Community News:
Latest PECL Releases for 07.22.2014
July 22, 2014 @ 07:04:33

Latest PECL Releases:
  • qb 2.4.0 Added option to emit errors as exceptions Fixed issue #36 - Incorrect cast to int Fixed issue #39 - Incompatibility with namespace usage Fixed issue #40 - Incompatibility with namespace usage Fixed issue #42 - Inability to append to array Fixed issue #43 - Segfault when opcache is used Fixed issue #46 - Incorrect array size when initialized with empty array Fixed issue #48 - Memory-mapped file don't get released on function exit Fixed issue #49 - Multiple static arrays cause failure to compile to native code Fixed issue #50 - Cannot pass GD image as int8[][4] Fixed issue $51 - Multithreading fails when pcntl_fork() is used

  • swoole 1.7.4 - Task process support timer - Repair UDP error BUG - Add SSL-server support - Reload is effective for task_worker. - When the pipe is filled with poll is waiting for the write, rather than packet loss - Increase the clang compiler support - Repair shutdown task_worker and manager abnormal stop

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Anna Filina:
Common PHP Mistakes
July 21, 2014 @ 13:53:31

Anna Filina has posted her own addendum to a top ten list of common PHP programmer mistakes, adding seven more of her own.

I was recently asked by one of my readers to give feedback on the following article he read: 10 Most Common PHP Mistakes. It is well written and very thorough. Most of the tips are specific to PHP, others are about web programming in general or database performance. It's a very good read. I was also asked to contribute to this list, so here are 7 more tips.

Her list of seven touches on topics like caching, allowing SQL injection, disabling error reporting and ignoring accessibility. She also includes some configuration settings, code and links to other tools/resources to help provide information on preventing these other mistakes.

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common programmer mistakes additional tips

Link: http://afilina.com/common-php-mistakes/

php[architect]:
Sending HTML Emails with Drupal 7, Webform, and Mandrill
July 21, 2014 @ 12:42:45

The php[architect] site has a new tutorial posted giving you a step by step guide to sending HTML email with the combination of Drupal 7, Webform and Mandrill (the mail service by Mailchimp).

By default, Drupal is configured to send out plain text emails. For many developers, plain text email is sufficient and preferable to HTML email. HTML email is still, in this day and age, not guaranteed to render the same across email clients, more likely to be labeled as spam, and requires a significant amount of testing to make sure it works. Still, a minimally styled HTML message can be easier for recipients to read and help reinforce your brand/design (if you don't depend on images to do so). In this article, we'll look at the modules to install and configure to enable HTML emails and, specifically, how to change the default Webform email template to send submissions as HTML.

The tutorial comes in four different sections, each with plenty of description and some code to make it happen:

  • Set up your site to send email
  • Allow outgoing email to use HTML
  • Formatting Outgoing Email
  • Send Webform Submission as HTML Emails
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tutorial html email mandrill drupal7 webform

Link: http://www.phparch.com/2014/07/sending-html-emails-with-drupal-7-webform-and-mandrill/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Social Network Authentication Twitter and Facebook
July 21, 2014 @ 11:32:12

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series of tutorials showing how to authentication your users against various social networks. In the previous post they covered connecting to Google+ and in this latest post they move on to two other popular social networks: Facebook and Twitter.

In the previous parts of this series, we created our initial interfaces, set up our Google+ login functionality and talked about how we can merge our accounts together. In this article, we will integrate Twitter and Facebook within our application. You will see a lot of similarities with the Google+ article, so if you could follow that one easily, you won't have much trouble with this one. If you haven't read that article yet, I suggest you read it first before continuing this article.

He starts off with the Twitter authentication, creating a new "SocialLogin" object type for it and defining the three required properties it needs to connect. Code is included to make the OAuth connection, pass along the callback URL and forward on the user to the Twitter site for approval. Code is also included to store the data about the Twitter user in your application. Next up is Facebook. The connection is very similar to the others with only a slight difference in the data that's required. You can find the full code for the tutorial so far in this Github repository.

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social network authentication tutorial series twitter facebook

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/social-network-authentication-twitter-facebook/

NetTuts.com:
Best Practices When Working With Sensitive Data Securing Your Application
July 21, 2014 @ 10:27:07

The NetTuts.com site has a new tutorial posted today sharing some tips about working with sensitive data in your applications and steps to secure it.

In my previous article, I showed you how to protect your server from attacks and malicious software. This part will focus completely on the third layer of security - your application itself. So here, I will show you techniques that you can use to protect your application from attacks and intrusions.

There's three main topics covered here, each with a few subpoints and some code examples:

  • Using a Database
  • Use a Salt When Hashing
  • POSIX: Drop Privileges When You Don't Need Them
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secure data application tutorial sensitive

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/best-practices-when-working-with-sensitive-data-securing-your-application--cms-21719

Phil Sturgeon:
Send PSR-0 to the Standards Farm in the Sky
July 21, 2014 @ 09:09:26

In his latest post Phil Sturgeon makes a request of the PHP community - to "send PSR-0 to to Standards Farm in the Sky". Or, to put it another way, deprecate it in favor of the more recent autoloader handling of PSR-4.

This article attempts to convince you that deprecating the PSR-0 auto-loading standard in favor of the PSR-4 auto-loading standard is not only a good idea, but a problemless wonderland of happy benefits, in the hope that when I try to get this done on the FIG mailing list, people will be happy about it instead of sad or rage-mode. [...] I believe it was talked about as an alternative at the time because we knew that the PHP community would drop their collective bricks if we tried to pull PSR-0 out from under them, right as they were just slowly getting used to using it.

He covers a few different topics and his opinions on each including the "hate" for PSR-0 (for wanting to get rid of it) and why it should even be considered for deprecation in the first place. He also reminds readers that he's advocating the deprecation of PSR-0, not the removal of it as a standard. It can still exist and be used but it will no longer be the "moving forward" method of autoloading (in favor of PSR-4). He also comments on the large user base out there on PHP <=5.2 that wouldn't be able to make the update to PSR-4 and a suggestion to projects wanting to encourage the migration.

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deprecate psr0 standards psr4 autoload

Link: http://philsturgeon.uk/blog/2014/07/deprecate-psr0


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