Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Robert Basic:
Loading fixtures for a Symfony app in Behat tests
Mar 23, 2017 @ 10:38:58

Robert Basic has a new post to his site with some advice for the Behat users out there testing their Symfony applications. He shows how to easily load up fixture data with the help of Doctrine.

Performing end to end testing of any application requires from us to have a set of reliable test data in the database.

If we write a Symfony application and use Behat to do the end to end testing, the we can use the Doctrine fixtures bundle to create the required fixture loaders and load them in our Behat scenarios when required.

He walks you through the installation of the Doctrine fixtures bundle (via Composer, naturally) and how to enable it via the Symfony kernel configuration. He then includes an example of the fixture loader class from the FOSUserBundle and how it works. Next up is the installation of the Behat Symfony 2 extension and a bit of extra code to make a new feature context for Behat containing a "loadDataFixtures" method to do the heavy lifting.

tagged: fixture symfony application behat load extension bundle tutorial

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/loading-fixtures-for-a-symfony-app-in-behat-tests/

Stefano Alletti:
Symfony and Monolog, how use Processor in your project: a practical example
Mar 17, 2017 @ 12:23:44

Stefano Alletti has written up a post to his site showing how to combine Symfony and Monolog along with a custom "processor" to modify the message and content being logged.

We often have to use different micro-services who write in many log files. Use utilities like Kibana is a good thing, but in order to take full advantage of its features we have to try to standardize and normalize the logs.

The company where I work having introduced Kibana recently, he asked me to implement a proper strategy to log all the micro-services.

He starts by outlining the fields that are required to be in the log output (a great place to start) before moving into the code to implement the logging. He briefly talks about Monolog itself and how to implement it in a Symfony application. The remainder of the post includes the code to implement the logger and how to add the custom processor to modify the extra data being included in the logged data. He also goes a step further and creates a custom formatter to modify the output in the message for the customer ID and product line values.

tagged: tutorial symfony monolog processor formatter integration

Link: https://stefanoalletti.wordpress.com/2017/03/09/symfony-and-monolog-how-use-processor-in-your-project/

Fabien Potencier:
The Symfony Trademark
Mar 15, 2017 @ 09:49:58

In a post to his own site Fabien Potencier attempts to clear up any confusion around the use of the Symfony trademark and how SensioLabs manages that trademark.

This blog post has been written after some concerns expressed on Twitter and Reddit about how SensioLabs manages the Symfony trademark. If you want to read the details about the Grafikart issue, scroll to the end [of the post]; reading the whole post is recommended though if you want to understand the whole story.

Fabien starts at the very beginning, talking about how he selected the name for the framework and how it evolved over the years. It was a few years in when he decided to register the trademark officially and the legal battle that came with it. He also talks about the trademark policies they worked up and other projects that have a similar setup. He then gets into some more specific examples where there could be conflicts with these rules.

Enforcing the trademark is a painful process and it costs a lot of money. But I'm convinced that doing so is my responsibility. Would it be fair to say no to people who follow the rules by asking for permission and let other companies do whatever they want? Not in my book.

The rest of the post is dedicated to one particular issue (involving Grafikart) and the issues that came up because of mishandling on the legal side and the changes being made to prevent the confusion in the future.

tagged: symfony trademark sensiolabs framework grafikart

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/the-symfony-trademark.html

Codevate.com:
Driving user engagement by leveraging Disqus in Symfony-based web apps
Mar 06, 2017 @ 10:27:22

The Codevate blog has a tutorial posted by Chris Lush showing how to "drive user engagement" with Disquis in a Symfony-based application. He basically shows how to use commenting, with the help of Disquis, to encourage user participation with your content without having to build your own.

Engaging your audience is an ever-increasing concern when publishing content, since having a community that visitors can witness and interact with can help drive repeat traffic to your website. One such approach would be to let users write comments about your content, creating discussion that others can engage with. The temptation to implement your own comment system is strong since at a surface level it's a simple problem to solve, but to build a robust solution that can deal with moderation requirements such as banning & blocking users, editing comments, or just exploring related threads within a forum can easily turn your "users can write comments" requirement into another project in its own right.

Disqus to the rescue.

He starts by showing the benefits that using Disquis can provide to your site and outlines the steps required to get it up on your site. He then walks you through the process, step-by-step, of registering with the Disquis service, adding the code to your site and even integrating single sign-on with your own backend system.

tagged: user engagement disquis tutorial symfony application

Link: https://www.codevate.com/blog/15-driving-user-engagement-by-leveraging-disqus-in-symfony-based-web-apps

SitePoint PHP Blog:
The State of PHP MVC Frameworks in 2017
Mar 03, 2017 @ 09:49:40

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post sharing the current state of PHP MVC frameworks in 2017. The article doesn't focus on any particular list of frameworks (though the more popular ones are used in the examples) and instead focus on the overall trends they've seen in frameworks and their use.

A simple question prompted me to sit down and write this follow up to my article from about a year ago: "Any thoughts about where things are today?"

He suggests that, while several of the major frameworks are still in active development and are seeing new features in recent versions, the front-runners are probably Laravel and Symfony. He includes trend numbers to back this up (popularity, basically) but also briefly touches on others: CakePHP, CodeIgniter and Zend Framework 2. He then breaks it down into two groups: Symfony/Laravel and "the rest". The post wraps up with a look at the rise of microservices, the "destruction of the monolith" and a more recent emphasis on scalability over just features.

tagged: state mvc framework 2017 opinion laravel symfony trend popularity

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/the-state-of-php-mvc-frameworks-in-2017/

Toptal.com:
PHP Frameworks: Choosing Between Symfony and Laravel
Mar 02, 2017 @ 11:26:17

On the TopTal.com blog Karin Sakhibgareev shares some of his thoughts around picking the right framework for your project. More specifically he focuses on the selection between two popular options: Symfony or Laravel.

Today, when starting a new project, one of the key decisions is to pick the right framework. It’s become hard to imagine building a complex web application from scratch nowadays without one.

Many popular languages for web development have their “default” framework, such as Ruby on Rails for Ruby, or Django for Python. However, PHP has no such single default and has multiple popular options to choose from.

[...] In this article, I am going to compare these two frameworks and show you how to implement simple, everyday features with each. This way, you can compare the code of real-life examples side by side.

He starts with a brief history of each project (Symfony and Laravel) and quick guides to getting them installed. He then configures them with a few basic options (database connection, security details, etc) and compares the setup processes against each other. The reminder of the post follows the same pattern covering:

  • routing setup and configuration
  • templating (Blade vs Twig)
  • dependency injection
  • database usage via ORMs
  • event dispatching/middleware

The post ends with a sort of "real world" application of each framework, showing what it would take to create a simple REST API. He finishes with his thoughts about the "winner" of the comparison...but suggests that it's more about the right tool for the right job than one framework that does it all.

tagged: toptal framework symfony laravel tutorial comparison

Link: https://www.toptal.com/php/choosing-between-symfony-and-laravel-frameworks

Frank de Jonge:
Battle Log: Symfony Routing performance considerations.
Feb 28, 2017 @ 10:55:24

In a new post to his site Frank de Jonge shares his "battle log" when looking into routing performance considerations in Symfony after a "deep dive" into the component's code.

Last week I took a deep dive into Symfony's Routing Component. A project I worked on suffered from a huge performance penalty caused by a routing mistake. This lead me on the path to discovering some interesting performance considerations. Some common practices align nicely with Symfony's optimisations, let's look into those.

He starts off by describing the process he took to start the investigation and what prompted him to investigate the performance issue. He talks about his use of profiling to locate the bottleneck and track down the root cause. He answers the five "why's" about the issue and uses that to guide an approach. Ultimately he located the source of the issue - YAML parsing that shouldn't have been needed - and what the component does to make it more performant in non-development environments. He ends the post with a list of four performance considerations as you're going through your own development to get the most out of the component.

tagged: symfony performance routing considerations deepdive

Link: https://blog.frankdejonge.nl/symfony-routing-performance-considerations/

Eleven Labs Blog:
RabbitMQ: Publish, Consume, and Retry Messages
Feb 03, 2017 @ 12:53:06

On the Eleven Labs blog they're posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate RabbitMQ functionality into your Symfony-based application making use of a few handy tools that do some of the heavy lifting for you and how messages are handled (and what to do when they error).

RabbitMQ is a message broker, allowing to process things asynchronously. There’s already an article written about it, if you’re not familiar with RabbitMQ.

What I’d like to talk to you about is the lifecycle of a message, with error handling. Everything in a few lines of code. Therefore, we’re going to configure a RabbitMQ virtual host, publish a message, consume it and retry publication if any error occurs.

They use the RabbitMQ admin toolkit and Swarrot packages to get the job done. First up is the configuration of the tools, creating a default_vhost.yml file defining a queue and setting up the exchanges and parameters for the default route ("/"). They show an example of what the RabbitMQ UI looks like with this new exchange up and working and how to get more information about this "default" queue. Next up is the consumption and publication of messages. They include an example app/config/config.yml file that defines some settings the Swarrot library (via the SwarrotBundle) needs to understand the connections, consumers and type of provider to use. Finally he shows the configuration so it all knows how to publish messages and a quick example of PHP code that sends a simple string message to be handled by the RabbitMQ workers. The post ends with a bit more configuration and some examples of how to handle errors in this Swarrot/RabbitMQ Admin Toolkit setup and making use of some middleware to help with message retries and number of attempts.

tagged: tutorial rabbitmq symfony bundle swarrot configuration publish consume retry error

Link: http://blog.eleven-labs.com/en/rabbitmq-publish-consume-retry-messages/

Symfony Finland:
Sharing state in a Symfony hybrid with Twig, React and other JavaScript apps
Jan 26, 2017 @ 11:14:12

The Symfony Finland site has posted a new tutorial showing you how you can share state in a Symfony application between Twig, React and other Javascript-based applications.

Front end development has certainly grown up in the last few years. UI logic is increasingly being moved to the client side, but the traditional server-rendered views aren't going anywhere soon. And they shouldn't.

The two methods will live alongside each other and you'll have to work with two worlds. Let's explore an idea how to make this pleasant to work with, by sharing state between Twig templates and JavaScript.

The post starts with some background on a case where this kind of sharing was a requirement and, while the initial version was scrapped, a prototype application was born. He details what this prototype showcases (which JS libraries) and links to the Javascript involved over on GitHub. They then get into the code examples showing the creation of an AppState object that handles the serializing of the state information and store the result in the database via a Doctrine connection. This value is then output to the pages that require it, making it available to the frontend application (Vue.js, React or plain Javascript).

tagged: tutorial symfony shared state backend frontend javascript twig react vuejs

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/sharing-state-in-a-symfony-hybrid-app-with-twig-react-etc

Matthias Noback:
Introducing the SymfonyConsoleForm package
Jan 20, 2017 @ 11:12:51

In a new post to his site Matthias Noback introduces you to a package that can help you in your Symfony-based console application, combining the Form and Console components, to make it easier to create "forms" on the CLI.

About 2 years ago I created a package that combines the power of two famous Symfony components: the Form component and the Console component. In short: this package allows you to interactively fill in a form by typing in the answers at the CLI. When I started working on it, this seemed like a pretty far-fetched idea. However, it made a lot of sense to me in terms of a the package in use, building a "form" that just asks the user to input a name. An image of the result is included as well. He ends the post with some of his other general findings during the process of creating the package and suggests a few common use cases including installation wizards that can be used in both the CLI and web interfaces.

tagged: symfonyconsoleform package tutorial console form component symfony

Link: https://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2017/01/introducing-symfony-console-form/