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Symfony Finland Blog:
PHP and Symfony Structure, Stability and Flexibility
July 03, 2015 @ 09:12:45

On the Symfony Finland blog they've posted a look at Symfony's past, present and future in terms of its structure and goals of stability and flexibility. This also includes some of the origins of PHP itself and how it evolved to the stage where creating framework made sense.

I like to think of modern PHP frameworks as glue to put together components to form something that is more than the sum of it's parts. [...] The Symfony Framework is a standard way (and framework code) to create applications using components. The application is always built with a specific structure, which allows code reuse of complete functionalities (Bundles in Symfony lingo) across projects. If you build using a collection of components, you'll need to invest time in learning how that software has decided to use the available components.

He talks more about the idea of components and how they make up a greater whole (like Symfony) and how they relate to the idea of "bundles". He then looks forward to the future of the framework, its long-term support and its work towards being fully PHP7 compatible.

The combination of the PHP language at 20 years and the Symfony framework at 10 years offers a stable platform with flexibility to adapt and grow in the future.
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symfony framework past present future component bundle stability structure flexibility

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/php-and-symfony-structure-stability-and-flexibility

Symfony Blog:
Symfony 2.3 achieves 100% HHVM compatibility
July 02, 2015 @ 10:53:11

On the Symfony blog they've posted an announcement that they've achieved 100% compatibility with HHVM, the virtual machine/engine created by Facebook, in version 2.3 of the framework.

HHVM is an open-source virtual machine designed for executing programs written in Hack and PHP. HHVM uses a just-in-time (JIT) compilation approach to achieve superior performance for PHP applications. During these last past months, HHVM and the upcoming PHP 7 version have engaged in an epic battle to become the fastest PHP engine. At Symfony we are thrilled because this fierce competition will ultimately benefit all of us.

The post shows some of the commits that were made towards the effort including the first from Joseph Bielawski and the final push from Nicolas Grekas in pull request 15,146 correcting issues in the Debug, DependencyInjection, Filesystem, Form, HttpFoundation, Process and Routing components.

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symfony hhvm compatibility onehundredpercent achievement

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/symfony-2-3-achieves-100-hhvm-compatibility

Kévin Dunglas:
Using PSR-7 in Symfony
June 24, 2015 @ 12:50:56

With the recent acceptance of the PSR-7 HTTP standard by the PHP-FIG, there's been a lot of articles about using it in various PHP frameworks. In this new post Kevin Douglas looks at the use of it in Symfony, how it relates to the HttpFoundation component and when it will be included in the framework itself.

Back in 2011, Symfony 2 introduced the HttpFoundation component, a PHP library representing HTTP messages with an object oriented API. HttpFoundation is a key in the success of the HTTP-centric approach of Symfony, and it definitely inspirited the PSR-7 specification. However, PSR-7 and HttpFoundation differ fundamentally in two aspects: PSR-7 messages are immutable, mutability is in the DNA of HttpFoundation and in PSR-7, almost everything is stream.

Because of immutability it is very hard to make HttpFoundation embracing PSR-7 without a huge backward compatibility break impacting thousands of existing applications and bundles.

Work was almost immediately started to support the PSR-7 specification in Symfony, however. As a result support will be ready to be included in Symfony 2.7 but, as the rest of the post shows, it can be introduced in versions 2.3 or greater through a "HTTP message bridge" library. He shows how to get this installed in your Symfony application instance and how to use it in your controllers to interact with Requests and Responses. He does point out, though, that while this can bring your release up to PSR-7 status it comes with some overhead that may not be worth it if you're concerned about performance.

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psr7 symfony bridge httpfoundation performance library

Link: http://dunglas.fr/2015/06/using-psr-7-in-symfony/

Loïc Chardonne:
Symfony Differently - part 2 Bootstrap
June 16, 2015 @ 10:46:03

Loïc Chardonne has posted the latest part in his "Symfony Differently" series (part one is here) with a focus on bootstrapping the application and configuring the environment that it will live in.

Our goal in this post is to bootstrap an application to then create a search endpoint for items. We've decided to use Symfony for a single reason: our company Acme used it since the beginning and the API developers team has Symfony and PHP skills.

He walks through the steps you'll need to get the application up and running:

  • Creating a new Symfony Standard Edition project
  • Configuring Apache
  • Moving the tests to a different directory, including Composer updates
  • Creating scripts for builds, testing and deployment

With all this structure in place, the next part of the series will start in on the functionality of the search endpoint and returning the results.

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symfony bootstrap differently tutorial series part2 project apache scripts tests

Link: http://gnugat.github.io/2015/06/10/sf-differently-part-2-bootstrap.html

Loïc Chardonne:
Symfony Differently - part 1 Introduction
June 12, 2015 @ 08:48:26

Loïc Chardonne has kicked off a new series of posts on his site that talk about doing "Symfony Differently" and some things to consider/change to increase your Symfony application's performance.

Symfony is an amazing HTTP framework which powers high traffic websites. Performance shouldn't be a concern when first creating a website, because between the time it is launched and the time it actually has a high traffic many things that we didn't expect in the first days will happen: requirements will change, user behavior will change, even the team can change.

Optimizing applications has an impact over maintenance, and making it harder to change right from the beginning might not be the best option. However when the need of performance actually arises, we need to tackle it. This series of articles is about this specific moment, and how to tackle it in a pragmatic way.

He starts with a basic project (Acme) and works through the process of adding a new feature to it: buying an item. He talks about the team they have to work with and the architecture of his sample application (a frontend application mostly). He then works through the data structure and flow of the new feature and other functionality that should be included. He ends the post with a bit of a wrap-up of this first part and talks about the next part in the series where the application will actually be bootstrapped.

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symfony performance optimize introduction project requirements team resources series part1

Link: http://gnugat.github.io/2015/06/03/sf-differently-part-1-introduction.html

Luciano Mammino:
Symfony security authentication made simple (well, maybe!)
June 04, 2015 @ 10:36:41

Luciano Mammino has a quick post to his site with information that tries to help make Symfony authentication simple (well, maybe).

The Symfony2 security component has the fame of being one of the most complex in the framework. I tend to believe that's partially true, not because the component is really that complex, but because there are (really) a lot of concepts involved and it may be difficult to understand them all at once and have a clear vision as a whole.

[...] Going back to the Symfony2 security component, the point is that I found out difficult at first glance to get a clear idea of what is going on behind the scenes and what I need to write to create a custom authentication mechanism. So in this post I will try to collect few interesting resources that helped me understanding it better and a graph I drawn to resume what I learned.

He provides a good list to some of the other resources that helped him along the way including several blog posts and links to the Symfony "cookbooks" about creating custom providers. He also shares a graph showing the full flow of the Symfony authentication process including commentary about each step.

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symfony authentication simple resources graph flow provider

Link: http://loige.co/symfony-security-authentication-made-simple/

Paul Jones:
Semantic Versioning and Public Interfaces
June 03, 2015 @ 09:16:33

Paul Jones has an interesting post to his site that makes the link between software versioning and public interfaces your code provides. He points out that, despite semantic versioning helping to define how to version your code, there's still some ambiguity about it and backwards compatibility.

Adherence to Semantic Versioning is just The Right Thing To Do, but it turns out you have to be extra-careful when modifying public interfaces to maintain backwards compatibility. This is obvious on reflection, but I never thought about it beforehand. Thanks to Hari KT for pointing it out. Why do you have to be extra-careful with interfaces and SemVer? [...] If we remove a public method, that's clearly a BC break. If we add a non-optional parameter to an existing public method, that's also clearly a BC break. [...] However, if we add a new public method to the concrete class, that is not a BC break. Likewise, changing the signature of an existing method to add an optional parameter is not a BC break either. [...] But what happens with an interface?

He suggests that changing current functionality (such as adding a non-optional parameter) is a backwards compatibility break but in an interface so is adding a new method. By adding a method you "break" the implementation someone already has, causing plenty of trouble for the users. He wonders about the right approach for making these updates, if it's creating a new interface or just extending the current one and having users migrate. He also includes a few update notes about abstract classes and how Symfony handles BC breaks too.

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versioning public interface backwardscompatibility break bc abstract symfony

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6136

Jonathan Wage:
Using the Symfony Expression Language for a Reward Rules Engine
May 28, 2015 @ 10:07:27

Jonathan Wage has a new tutorial on his site showing you how to use the Symfony Expression Language to create simple logic statements. He illustrates with a project they (OpenSky) applied it on - a "reward" rules engine.

We recently adopted the Symfony Expression Language in the rules engine at OpenSky. It has brought a new level of flexibility to our system and creating new logic has never been easier. [...] The expression language allows you to perform expressions that get evaluated with raw PHP code and return a single value. It can be any type of value and is not limited to boolean values.

He starts with a simple example, showing how it can return a boolean based on the results of an evaluation of an array of data. He then takes this up to the next level and use it with a Doctrine object, evaluating the results of methods to apply "rewards" to a user's account. He shows how to define the Doctrine objects with the necessary methods, how to write the rule and a lookup class to find rules that apply to the current situation.

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symfony expression language rules engine tutorial doctrine object

Link: http://jwage.com/post/76799775984/using-the-symfony-expression-language-for-a-reward

D
May 27, 2015 @ 08:39:26

Hannes Van De Vreken has posted a tutorial to his site showing users of the Symfony Console component how to show progress on a stream using the ProgressBar helper and a bit of code to inspect the stream itself.

With PHP you can, next to handling HTTP requests, invoke scripts from the command line. [...] The Symfony console component is a very useful tool to define and invoke these kind of CLI tasks. [...] What is actually printed on the console is very important for the issuer of the task. Think of it as the command's usability. Too little runtime information, the less usable the task. [...] Enter the ProgressBar. The ProgressBar is an output helper that wraps the OutputInterface object.

He talks briefly about how the ProgressBar helper works in the console component's output and gives a simple example of the output. He then shows how to hook it into a bit of PHP using the stream_notification_callback optional parameter (defined in stream_context_create) to point to another class method that handles the progress bar updates. It performs a bit of introspection on the stream and updates the progress as its contents progress. He does point out a few caveats though, including that the transfer is not made asynchronous by this handling.

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symfony console stream progress progressbar helper tutorial

Link: https://hannesvdvreken.com/2015/05/12/stream-progress/

PMG Blog:
Symfony from Scratch
May 21, 2015 @ 08:41:15

In the latest post to the PMG blog Chris Davis shows us how to create a Symfony application from scratch, that is without using the Symfony Standard repository/skeleton application.

The end goal here is to have an application that will send a simple Hello World message. So we're going to cover the core framework stuff, but save things like templating, database access, ORMs, and forms for later. The goal here to see how to scaffold a Symfony app to better understand why symfony standard does what it does and where to deviate. We'll end up with an app that uses the Symfony 3 directory structure.

Starting with the smallest "composer.json" he can (just symfony/symfony) he walks through the creation of the application one step at a time:

  • The Application Kernel
  • Handling Web Requests
  • What's in a Bundle?
  • Stepping into Configuration
  • AppBundle
  • Hello, World

The end result is a simple page outputting a "Hello, World" message, but it gives you a good foundation to work from and understanding of the simplest pieces needed to make a Symfony application.

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symfony scratch introduction simple application standard

Link: https://www.pmg.com/blog/symfony-from-scratch/


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