News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Symfony Blog:
New in Symfony 2.7
April 28, 2015 @ 10:13:14

The Symfony blog has been posted spotlights in several of the improvements in the 2.7 release of the framework over on their blog. Each of them describes the changes and includes some sample code showing the new feature in action:

Keep an eye on the Symfony blog for more of these component spotlights and improvements as they're released.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
symfony blog new feature symfony2 version release component

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/

ServerGrove Blog:
Symfony2 components overview OptionsResolver
April 23, 2015 @ 08:23:32

The ServerGrove blog has posted another in their spotlights on specific Symfony2 components. In this latest post they look at the OptionsResolver component.

In the 13th post of the Symfony2 components series we will be talking about one little but extremely useful component: OptionsResolver. This component helps us to reduce the boilerplate code required to create an options system with default parameters. As stated in the official docs, is array_replace on steroids.

They start with a common situation, wanting to use options from user input, but only if they exist, and otherwise provide a default. This includes the use of the array_replace function but with the OptionsResolver there's an even easier way. A simple example is included showing how to use it to define options (and throw an exception when an undefined one is set). They show how to use a closure to set defaults on a specific option with more complex logic and how to use the validation and normalization handling.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
optionsresolver component symfony2 overview options

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/04/13/symfony2-components-overview-optionsresolver/

ServerGrove Blog:
Symfony2 components overview Filesystem
April 22, 2015 @ 10:29:32

The ServerGrove blog has posted another in their series of Symfony2 component spotlights with a look at the Filesystem component.

The 15th post of the Symfony2 components series is focused on the Filesystem component, which provides some basic utilities to work with the filesystem. It extends PHP built-in functions such as mkdir() or copy() to make them more portable and easier to use and test.

They start by stating the common problems with working in the file system from PHP and the warnings/errors that can come with them. They show how this kind of thing can be prevented with the Filesystem component and the functionality it provides. They also list some of the other useful functions (besides mkdir and touch previous mentioned) including: chmod, rename, makePathRelative and mirror. They also briefly mention the file locking ability the component has to prevent issues with multiple services interacting with the same files.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
symfony2 component overview filesystem introduction

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/04/22/symfony2-components-overview-filesystem/

Rob Allen:
Using ZendConfig with a Slim app
April 21, 2015 @ 09:11:31

Rob Allen has a quick post to his site continuing his theme of Slim framework-related posts with this new post showing how to use the ZendConfig module with a Slim application.

Sometimes you need more configuration flexibility for your application than a single array. In these situations, I use the ZendConfig component which I install via composer: composer require "zendframework/zend-config". This will install the ZendConfig component, along with its dependency ZendStdlib.

He shows how to use the glob function to have the component load a set of configuration files and the order they'd load in. He also points out that the ZendConfig component supports other formats including YAML and JSON data. He also includes a code example showing how you can load multiple formats at the same time (ex. some .php files and some .yml files with one call).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
slim application zendframework2 config component zendconfig tutorial introduction

Link: http://akrabat.com/using-zendconfig-with-a-slim-application/

Hari KT:
Zend Feed and Guzzle
April 02, 2015 @ 10:43:06

Hari KT has posted some of the results of his work integrating the Guzzle client into the Zend Feed component for use in handling it's HTTP requests and responses.

You may have worked with Zend Feed as a standalone component. I don't know whether you have integrated Zend framework Feed with Guzzle as Http Client. This post is inspired by Matthew Weier O'Phinney, who have mentioned the same on github.

He starts with the contents of his composer.json configuration file, pulling in Guzzle, ZendFeed and ZendService, and explaining the need for each. He then makes a simple "GuzzleClient" class and "GuzzleResponse" class that fit with the needed interfaces used by ZendFeed. Then he "wires them up" and injects the custom client and responses classes into the ZendFeed instance.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
zendfeed component guzzle integrate http client interface tutorial

Link: http://harikt.com/blog/2015/04/01/zend-feed-and-guzzle/

ServerGrove Blog:
Symfony2 components overview Stopwatch
March 17, 2015 @ 11:12:40

The ServerGrove blog has returned with another of their overviews of a specific Symfony2 component. In this new article they talk about the Stopwatch component, a useful way to help in profiling execution of your application.

It's been a long wait, but we are back again with the Symfony2 components series. In the 12th post of the series, we cover the Stopwatch component. Even though is one of the smallest ones, that does not mean is not important, as plays a crucial role when we want to profile our code.

Since the article series is about working with the component individually, they show you how to get it installed via Composer by itself. They include a simple example of it in use, starting/stopping a "test" timer, getting the duration and getting the overall memory consumption. They also include a slightly more complex example timing the execution of a Fibonacci sequence, reporting back the execution time on each line of output. The article also covers other features like the "lap" method, sections for grouping events and the difficulties you'd have extending it.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
symfony2 component overview stopwatch introduction

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/03/16/symfony2-components-overview-stopwatch/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Exploring the Webiny Framework The StdLib Component
March 09, 2015 @ 11:57:47

In this first post in a new series on SitePoint's PHP blog Bruno Skvorc about the Webiny framework and why they chose to "reinvent the wheel" in a lot of their code. In this first post Bruno focuses in on the StdLib component.

We all know there's no shortage of frameworks in the PHP ecosystem, so it surprised me quite a bit to see another pop up rather recently. The framework is called Webiny, and, while packed to the brim with wheel reinventions they deem necessary, there are some genuinely interesting components in there that warrant taking a look. In this introductory post, we won't be focusing on the framework as a whole, but on the most basic of its components - the StdLib.

The StdLib component is responsible for base level functionality including making using scalar variables (as opposed to objects) simpler. It makes use of traits to include its functionality across the board rather than through direct inheritance. He lists some of the features included in the component, various traits for reuse, like the "factory loader" and validator traits. He includes descriptions and code examples of several others as well, showing them in use and some of their limitations too.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
webiny framework series stdlib component part1

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/exploring-webiny-framework-stdlib-component/

Web Mozarts:
Resource Discovery with Puli
January 15, 2015 @ 11:14:53

Bernhard Schussek has written up a new post to the Web Mozarts blog talking about resource discovery with Puli. Puli is a management tool for the non-PHP files in your applications (CSS, Javascript, YAML, etc). In this post he talks about the use of the discovery component and its use of resource binding.

Many libraries support configuration code, translations, HTML themes or other content in files of a specific format. The Doctrine ORM, for example, is able to load entity mappings from special XML files. When setting up Doctrine, we need to pass the location of the *.dcm.xml file to Doctrine's XmlDriver. That's easy as long as we do it ourselves, but what if someone else uses our package? How will they find our file? What if multiple packages provide *.dcm.xml files? How do we find all these files? We need to remove the appropriate setup code after removing a package [and] we need to adapt the setup code after installing a new package. Multiply this effort for every other library that uses user-provided files and you end up with a lot of configuration effort. Let's see how Puli helps us to fix this.

He talks about the concept of package roles in the tool, breaking them down in resources and providers. He then shows how Puli makes it possible to discover resources by defining a type via Puli and the code for the discovery process. He then binds the XML configuration definition and executes a "find" to ensure it's configured correctly. Finally, he shows the process to use Puli in this Doctrine example allowing it to locate and use the XML mappings dynamically via a custom driver.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
puli resource discovery dynamic doctrine component

Link: http://webmozarts.com/2015/01/14/resource-discovery-with-puli/

Joshua Thijssen:
Debugging Symfony components
January 02, 2015 @ 09:44:53

Joshua Thijssen has a quick new post today talking about debugging Symfony components, sharing a simple but useful hint.

Don't you hate it when you are stepping through your debugger during a Symfony application debug session, and all of a sudden it cannot find files anymore as Symfony uses code located in the bootstrap.php.cache instead of the actual Symfony component. Symfony creates these cache-classes in order to speed up execution, but it makes that xdebug cannot find the correct code to step through anymore.

He found a solution in a few changes to his "app_dev.php" bootstrap file to alter the location of the autoloader and disable cache loading. This prevents issues with Symfony trying to access cached versions and use the actual files and locations, making debuggers much more happy.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
debug symfony component tip cache disable dev

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2014/12/31/debugging-symfony-components/

Phil Sturgeon:
Composer It's ALMOST Always About the Lock File
November 05, 2014 @ 11:44:49

In his latest post Phil Sturgeon talks about a point that's been argued on both sides of the Composer users out there - whether or not to commit the "composer.lock" file. Phil talks some about it in his article and suggests that you should commit it for applications but not for components.

If you and your employees are a little vague with your composer.json specifications and you don't have a composer.lock then you can end up on different versions between you. Theoretically, if component developers are using SemVer and you're being careful then you should be fine, but keeping your lock in version control will make sure that the same version is on your dev teams computers. This will happen every time you run $ composer install. If you are on Heroku or EngineYard then this will be used for the deployment of your production components as a built in hook, which is awesome.

He mentions an article from Davey Shafik, this being his reaction to it. He suggests, though, that an absolute of "always commit for components" may be too much and could potentially cause other problems. He points out that since the "composer.lock" handling is local to the directory, you can hit up against version requirement issues between them in your application as a whole. He wonders "how strict is too strict" when defining dependencies and some things to think about (like your users) when making the choice to upgrade the libraries you use.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
composer composerlock file commit version semanticversioning semver component application

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/blog/2014/11/composer-its-almost-always-about-the-lock-file


Community Events

Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


introduction configure series example performance language api community conference podcast library symfony2 install laravel php7 release opinion application interview framework

All content copyright, 2015 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework