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Rob Allen:
Displaying errors in Expressive with Twig
Oct 19, 2017 @ 12:47:36

Rob Allen has a quick post for the Twig and Zend Expressive users out there showing how to display errors if you're not using the Whoops error handler.

If you're not using the Whoops error handler with Expressive and are using the Twig renderer, then you are given no information about the problem that occurred, even in debug mode.

He includes the Twig template to output the error message and, if the application is in "debug" mode, show an optional block of extra information. This provides details about the exception thrown and some of the previous errors. The previous errors are looped about output to provide more context around the failure.

tagged: error twig zend zendexpressive tutorial output debug

Link: https://akrabat.com/displaying-errors-in-expressive-with-twig/

Zend Framework Blog:
Emitting Responses with Diactoros
Sep 15, 2017 @ 09:14:05

On the Zend Framework blog they've posted a tutorial from project lead Matthew Weier O'Phinney showing how to use the Diactoros package to create response emitters. These emitters are just methods of output related to HTTP handling (like headers, response codes and normal text output).

When writing middleware-based applications, at some point you will need to emit your response.

PSR-7 defines the various interfaces related to HTTP messages, but does not define how they will be used. Diactoros defines several utility classes for these purposes, including a ServerRequestFactory for generating a ServerRequest instance from the PHP SAPI in use, and a set of emitters, for emitting responses back to the client. In this post, we'll detail the purpose of emitters, the emitters shipped with Diactoros, and some strategies for emitting content to your users.

He starts by describing what "emitters" are in the context of PSR-7 applications and shows the code definition of the EmitterInterface, the base of all emitter classes. After covering some of the emitters that Diactoros includes he shows how to create one to emit file information and how you can mix and match them in a emitter "stack" to perform more that one operation on the output.

tagged: diactoros tutorial emitter response output example interface

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-09-14-diactoros-emitters.html

Pawel Mikolajczuk:
Custom Caching for Twig
Aug 16, 2017 @ 11:07:07

In this post to his Medium blog Pawel Mikolajczuk shares some helpful tips for getting the most performance out of your Twig output with some custom caching techniques.

In Superdesk Publisher we have implemented Mutlitenancy with possibility to have multiple themes (but one activated). To make process of switching, uploading and updating themes for tenant we had to came up with solution to clear cache only for one particular theme not the whole instance (with many organisations and tenants).

To achieve that we created custom Twig Cache class.

He then shares the code for the class, extending the base Twig filesystem caching, to work with the multi-tenant architecture. It ensures that the output from one account is completely separate from another, preventing concerns of the wrong data being shown to the wrong user. He also shows how to enable it in the application configuration (Symfony) and a custom "compiler pass" class to finish the integration.

tagged: twig custom cache class output multitenant architecture

Link: https://medium.com/@pawel.mikolajczuk/custom-caching-for-twig-f9a7303cebdd

Laravel News:
Generate a JSON Feed with Laravel
May 24, 2017 @ 10:49:46

In a new tutorial posted to the Laravel News site Eric Barnes shows you how to easily create JSON feed output from the data in a Laravel application. JSON feed is a new standard that's been defined to try to bring more structure to JSON responses for feeds, following in the tradition of RSS feed structure.

JSON Feed is a new standard to formalize a JSON based RSS feed that aims to simplify creating feeds by doing away with the XML standard. Implementing a feed for your site is simple, and the spec is surprisingly clear.

[...] I just implemented this feed format for Laravel News, and you can find the results here. As a quick example let’s go through setting up a feed like this.

He then walks you through the code required to create the feed, sharing a listing of posts (the latest 20) from the Laravel News site. He then defines the main feed data, adds in each of the posts to the "items" set and returns the resulting array for translation into JSON output.

tagged: jsonfeed standard laravel tutorial output json feed

Link: https://laravel-news.com/generate-a-json-feed-with-laravel

Zend Framework Blog:
Context-specific escaping with zend-escaper
May 17, 2017 @ 09:44:25

The Zend Framework blog has continued their series spotlighting individual components of the framework and putting them to use outside of a ZF-based application. In the latest post they show how to use zend-escaper to handle context-specific escaping.

Security of your website is not just about mitigating and preventing things like SQL injection; it's also about protecting your users as they browse the site from things like cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks, cross-site request forgery (CSRF), and more. In particular, you need to be very careful about how you generate HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to ensure that you do not create such vectors.

As the mantra goes, filter input, and escape output.

They start with some of the main issues around escaping output in PHP (and some of the inconsistencies) and what zend-escaper can to to help. The tutorial then shows how to pull the component into your current application via Composer and set up a new Escaper instance. It briefly covers the built-in escaping methods and then provides some more real-world examples of how it can be used to protect your application.

tagged: zendescaper component tutorial introduction output escaping

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-05-16-zend-escaper.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Caching middleware with Expressive
Apr 19, 2017 @ 12:12:32

On the Zend Framework blog Enrico Zimuel has posted a tutorial showing you how to use middleware caching in Zend Expressive to help increase the overall performance of your application.

Performance is one of the key feature for web application. Using a middleware architecture makes it very simple to implement a caching system in PHP.

The general idea is to store the response output of a URL in a file (or in memory, using memcached) and use it for subsequent requests. In this way we can bypass the execution of the previous middlewares starting from the second request.

Of course, this technique can only be applied for static contents, that does not require update for each HTTP request.

He shows how to implement the "cachable" middleware, starting with a version that caches the return content based on the URL requested. He then shows how to configure the caching system to specify settings like path, lifetime and the enabled/disabled state. This is stored as a PHP configuration where the autoloader can get to it and the class as a dependency on the middleware itself.

tagged: cache middleware output zendexpressive tutorial response content

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-04-19-caching-middleware.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PHP Fractal – Make Your API’s JSON Pretty, Always!
Feb 27, 2017 @ 10:28:55

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial posted by author Younes Rafie covering the use of the Fractal library from The PHP League to create "pretty" JSON API output.

If you’ve built an API before, I’ll bet you’re used to dumping data directly as a response. It may not be harmful if done right, but there are practical alternatives that can help solve this small problem.

One of the available solutions is Fractal. It allows us to create a new transformation layer for our models before returning them as a response. It’s very flexible and easy to integrate into any application or framework.

They use a Laravel application as the base, creating a simple database of user information and relating users to roles. The tutorial then starts in on using Fractal, building out "transformers" for the data. These transformers take in the data/object and, inside of a "transform" method, modify the output and return a "prettier" version. They show it in use in a controller, outputting a collection of user data, only returning the name and email values. The tutorial also covers a few other Fractal-related topics including pagination, including sub-resources and eager loading.

tagged: fractal api json output transform tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/php-fractal-make-your-apis-json-pretty-always/

Laravel News:
In Laravel 5.4 You Can Use Markdown in Your Emails
Dec 14, 2016 @ 10:19:10

As is mentioned in this post on the Laravel News site one of the improvements coming in Laravel v5.4 will be the ability to use Markdown formatting in your emails.

Laravel 5.3 introduced two new features around email, the Mailables and Notifications which allow you to send the same message through email, SMS, and other channels.

Building on top of these improvements, Laravel 5.4 is going to include a brand new Markdown system for creating email templates.

Under the hood, this feature implements the Parsedown parser with its companion, Markdown Extra so you can use tables.

They go on to describe how this feature is integrated with the "components and slots" handling also recently introduced in the framework for things like headers, messages, layouts and tables. Also included is some example code showing how to return the Markdown parsed version of a view, using them in notifications and how to use inline styling.

tagged: laravel markdown email mailable formatting output tutorial v54 framework

Link: https://laravel-news.com/laravel-markdown-emails

INANI El Houssain:
Build your OWN switch statment using Laravel’s custom blade directives
Nov 03, 2016 @ 10:26:01

In this post on his Medium blog INANI El Houssain shows you how to create a custom directive for use with Laravel's Blade templating language. In this example he shows how to make a custom switch statement, something commonly used on the PHP side to select an action based on a value.

One of the good points of Laravel’s framework is that it allows you to make your own components, macros and directives. so today we will make use of Laravel’s Custom Blade directives and make something good.

He starts with a simple "hello world" example to show where the pieces all live, outputting a simple "Hello $name" string. He then moves into the creation of the "@switch" directive having it write out the PHP code required for the switch to start and end. He adds in two more tags to start and end the different cases: @case and @endcase. The post wraps up with an example of all of these tags in use and how to catch when the value under evaluation might be empty.

tagged: laravel blade directive custom output switch tutorial case

Link: https://medium.com/@InaniT0/build-your-own-switch-statment-using-laravels-custom-blade-directives-218244e41a7c#.dtkbzif3j

Tighten.co:
A better dd() for your TDD
Oct 13, 2016 @ 11:57:45

On the Tighten.co blog they have a recent post sharing a better dd() for your TDD - basically a better method for debugging the current state of object with a "dump and die" function.

An important part of every Laravel developer's debugging arsenal is the humble dd() helper function—"dump and die"—to output the contents of a variable and terminate execution of your code. In the browser, dd() results in a structured, easy-to-read tree, complete with little arrow buttons that can be clicked to expand or hide children of nested structures. In the terminal, however, it's a different story.

[...] Fortunately, it's simple to build your very own customized version of dd() to help tame your unwieldy terminal output—helping you find the details you're interested in quickly, without wearing out your trackpad (and your patience).

He provides two options you can use to help clean up the output of a "dump or die" method from the extensive results the current "dd" function provides:

Kint provides a few other helper methods you can use and easily configurable max and min depth to show in the output.

tagged: tdd testing vardumper kint library package output debugging

Link: https://blog.tighten.co/a-better-dd-for-your-tdd