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Laravel Podcast:
Episode 30 Trouble, Trouble, Trouble...
June 25, 2015 @ 08:50:41

The Laravel Podcast, hosted by Matt Stauffer (with regular guests Taylor Otwell and Jeffrey Way) has posted their latest episode today - Episode #30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble....

In this episode, the crew discusses architecture driven religious wars and the recent drama surrounding Apple Music.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed to get this and future episodes as they're released. Be sure to also follow them on Twitter for announcements when new episodes are released.

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laravel podcast ep30 trouble architecture religious war apple music

Link: http://www.laravelpodcast.com/episodes/13327-episode-30-trouble-trouble-trouble

MongoDB Blog:
Call for Feedback The New PHP and HHVM Drivers
March 12, 2015 @ 11:33:23

The MongoDB blog has a new post asking for feedback on what the user community thinks of their approach to supporting MongoDB functionality in PHP 5.x, HHVM and even out to PHP7.

Since the PHP driver first appeared on the scene, MongoDB has gone through many changes. [...] Beyond MongoDB's features, our ecosystem has also changed. [...] During the spring of 2014, we worked with a team of students from Facebook's Open Academy program to prototype an HHVM driver modeled after the 1.x API.

[...] Although the final result was not feature complete, the project was a valuable learning experience. The C driver proved quite up to the task, and HNI, which allows an HHVM extension to be written with a combination of PHP and C++, highlighted critical areas of the driver for which we'd want to use C. This all leads up to the question of how best to support PHP 5.x, HHVM, and PHP 7.0 with our next-generation driver.

They've shared the overview of the new driver structure including three layers: the system level functionality, the extensions themselves and a MongoDB userland library. They walk through the thinking on each of the pieces of the puzzle and how they all couple together to make for a more robust, flexible system that's also easy to use.

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mongodb drivers extension mongo userland library architecture opinion feedback

Link: http://www.mongodb.com/blog/post/call-feedback-new-php-and-hhvm-drivers

Hailoapp.com:
A Journey into Microservices
March 11, 2015 @ 11:23:34

On the Hailo.com blog Matt Heath has posted a series of articles about their transition from a "monolith" codebase out into a set of microservices for the Hallo app system.

Hailo, like many startups, started small; small enough that our offices were below deck on a boat in central London - the HMS President. Working on a boat as a small focused team, we built out our original apps and APIs using tried and tested technologies, including Java, PHP, MySQL and Redis, all running on Amazon's EC2 platform. [...] After we launched in London, and then Dublin, we expanded from one continent to two, and then three; launching first in North America, and then in Asia. This posed a number of challenges-the main one being locality of customer data.

They describe this customer data problem in a bit more detail with the issue mostly revolving around the geolocation of the user and their information. They talk about "going global" and the steps they took to make the move. In the three parts of the series, they explain the changes they made and why they were effective for their application:

They end the series with some links to other resources that help compliment the subjects mentioned and link to slides from a presentation around the same topic.

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microservice journey series part1 part2 part3 introduction architecture api halloapp

Link: https://sudo.hailoapp.com/services/2015/03/09/journey-into-a-microservice-world-part-1/

Programming Are Hard:
Structuring my applications
March 06, 2015 @ 11:25:54

On the Programming Are Hard site there's a recent post looking at PHP application structure and how they handled the structure of one of their applications.

One of the biggest struggles for me, as an app developer, is coming up with an architecture that I'm happy with. It's something I wish other developers talked about more often. I thoroughly enjoyed Kris Wallsmith's SymfonyCon talk. It's very raw and real and doesn't come across as him talking down to anyone at all. Do I agree with everything he says? No, but that's not a bad thing. It's very insightful and I really enjoy taking a peak behind the curtains and seeing how other people do things. This is my attempt at doing just that.

He's broken down the structure into the overall parts and provided examples and summaries of each:

  • The use of packages
  • Entities
  • Events and Event Listeners
  • Commands and Handlers
  • Exceptions
  • Providers
  • Repositories
  • Security functionality
  • Services
  • Testing
  • Validation
  • Value Objects

Each section includes sample code and a description of where in the overall directory structure it fits. The setup is largely based on a Symfony application but it can be extracted (since it's mostly concepts) to most frameworks out there, even custom ones.

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Link: http://programmingarehard.com/2015/03/04/structing-my-application.html

TheoDo.fr:
Clean Architecture
December 23, 2014 @ 10:37:28

In an article on Thedo.fr Tristan Roussel introduces you to some of the concepts behind Clean Architecture based on a talk he recently attended at a local Symfony user group.

One particular talk retained my attention and I want to tell you about it. Let me warn you first, this is just an introduction, and I'm not going into much detail, don't hesitate to post comments if you feel something is not clear, or deserves a better exposure! [...] So. What is Clean Architecture? It's so fresh that it doesn't even have a Wikipedia article.

He starts off with what the idea of Clean Architecture is trying to accomplish and where some of the ideas have evolved from. He includes some of the objectives and guiding principles as well as a diagram of how this architecture might be laid out. He gets into an actual use case for this type of structure and where abstract entities, controllers and presenters fit into the picture. He links to some of the code as provided as part of the presentation and some of the things to consider when trying it out for your application.

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Link: http://www.theodo.fr/blog/2014/12/sfpot-paris-2014-12-12-pepiniere-27/

Anthony Ferrara:
A Point On MVC And Architecture
December 02, 2014 @ 12:10:24

Anthony Ferrara has posted another in his series looking at MVC as a design pattern and as an idea for building web applications. In this latest post he goes on to make a point about MVC, how it relates to architecture and CRUD.

Last week I post a post called Alternatives To MVC. In it, I described some alternatives to MVC and why they all suck as application architectures (or more specifically, are not application architectures). I left a pretty big teaser at the end towards a next post. Well, I'm still working on it. It's a lot bigger job than I realized. But I did want to make a comment on a comment that was left on the last post.

He responds to the comment (essentially that CRUD is a solved problem) and where the need for customizations is needed. He suggests what the real problem is, though: the three classes of developers - CMS users, custom developers and users of both.

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mvc architecture opinion problem crud comment response

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/12/a-point-on-mvc-and-architecture.html

Anthony Ferrara:
Alternatives To MVC
November 25, 2014 @ 11:52:15

Following up on his previous article talking about the MVC design pattern (and the idea of "MVC"), Anthony Ferrara has posted some alternatives to MVC for your consideration. These other options are mostly variants of the typical MVC structure and could be considered "siblings".

Last week, I wrote A Beginner's Guide To MVC For The Web. In it, I described some of the problems with both the MVC pattern and the conceptual "MVC" that frameworks use. But what I didn't do is describe better ways. I didn't describe any of the alternatives. So let's do that. Let's talk about some of the alternatives to MVC...

He starts by restating some of the major issues with the typical MVC implementation (three of them). From there, he covers each of the alternatives with a summary paragraph or three about each:

He talks about the similarities between them, mainly that they're all "triads" of functionality and that they all have the same basic purpose. He also suggests that they're all "pretending" to be application architectures.

If it's not clear where something fits in your application, that's a sign that your application architecture is flawed. Not that you need to introduce some magic in to get it to work. So let's admit that none of these are application architectures... And let's admit that there is a problem we need to solve.
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Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/11/alternatives-to-mvc.html

Envato:
The Future of WordPress
July 10, 2014 @ 13:14:07

On the Envato blog there's a recent post that covers some of the future of WordPress resulting from some discussions at a recent Future of WordPress panel from the WP Think Tank.

There's one thing that we can all agree on: the future of WordPress is bright. Outside of this, the ever-passionate WordPress community is a hotbed for debates on where WordPress should go from here. With 22% of websites running on WordPress, a vibrant open-source community, amazing themes and plugins and a developer-friendly mindset, WordPress is stronger today than it has ever been. So what's next?

Their list includes changes touching just about all parts of the application including plenty of UI updates, a continued focus on backwards compatibility a shift towards plugin-driven development. This would allow new features to be installed as plugins when they're ready rather than modifying the core package. There's also some emphasis being put on making it work for "more than just blogging" and push towards more enterprise-level acceptance.

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Link: http://inside.envato.com/the-future-of-wordpress/

Paul Jones:
Refactoring To Action-Domain-Responder
June 06, 2014 @ 10:06:15

Paul Jones has a new post to his site today with a more in-depth look at his proposed "Action-Domain-Responder" design pattern and how to refactor an application, based on some with with the Aura framework, to use it.

The v1 version of the Aura framework includes a controller to handle web assets. The idea for this controller was that an Aura package might have images, scripts, and stylesheets that need to be publicly available, but in development you don't necessarily want to copy them to a public document root every time you change them. [...] That v1 version is a mess. The Controller handles the response-building entirely, and there is no Model separation at all. Let's try refactoring it to an Action-Domain-Responder architecture and clean it up some for a v2 version.

Associated code it just linked to, but he does summarize the steps needed to make the transition: extract the domain logic, move responses to a separate class and rename the controller to an action. He also shows how making this separation makes testing easier and links to examples of tests for each. He finishes the post with two final notes about the refactor. One points out that this method isn't the only way to handle this architecture shift and that the action returns a responder, not a response object.

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action domain responder designpattern architecture refactor

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6006

Coding the Architecture:
Five things every developer should know about software architecture
March 05, 2014 @ 11:57:58

While not specific to PHP, this new article on the Coding the Architecture blog gives some good insights on what developers should know about software architecture.

Now I may be biased, but a quick look at my calendar hints to me that there's a renewed and growing interest in software architecture. Although I really like much of the improvement the agile movement has provided to the software development industry, I still can't help feeling that there are a large number of teams out there who struggle with a lack of process.

[...] Put very simply, software architecture plays a pivotal role in the delivery of successful software yet it's frustratingly neglected by many teams. Whether performed by one person or shared amongst the team, the architecture role exists on even the most agile of teams yet the balance of up front and evolutionary thinking often reflects aspiration rather than reality. The big problem is that software architecture has fallen out of favour over the past decade or so. Here are five things that every software developer should know about it.

Each of the five things comes with a paragraph of explanation (and some links to additional resources):

  • Software architecture isn't about big design up front
  • Every software team needs to consider software architecture
  • The software architecture role is about coding, coaching and collaboration
  • You don't need to use UML
  • A good software architecture enables agility
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software developer tips top5 architecture

Link: http://www.codingthearchitecture.com/2014/03/05/five_things_every_developer_should_know_about_software_architecture.html


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