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Sammy Kaye Powers:
Writing tests for PHP source (Series)
Jul 21, 2017 @ 11:21:48

Sammy Kaye Powers has a series of posts over on his site introducing you to testing the PHP language with .phpt tests. So far he's introduced the topic, shown how to run the tests and debugging failing tests.

If you've ever wanted to get involved with PHP internals, writing tests is a great way to get your foot into the door. The tests are written in PHP so you don't even need to know C to get started.

Each of the posts also comes with a screencast, narrated by Sammy, showing the information presented in the tutorial:

There's more to come in the series as he still plans to teach about how to fix current tests and how to eventually create your own. Stay tuned to his site for more tutorials in the series.

tagged: test unittest phpt language source series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://www.sammyk.me/compiling-php-from-source-writing-tests-for-php-source

Delicious Brains Blog:
Craft CMS | Self-Hosted WordPress Alternatives Part 1
Jul 11, 2017 @ 10:52:03

The Delicious Brains site has kicked off a new series of posts looking at other options besides WordPress for self-hosted content management systems. In this initial article they cover the Craft CMS that's built on top of the Yii framework.

To kick this off, I’ll be taking a look at Craft CMS by Pixel & Tonic, a software development team that was behind some of the best add-ons for ExpressionEngine. They have since moved on from ExpressionEngine to create their own CMS that is built on the popular Yii framework.

Craft bills itself as “a content-first CMS that aims to make life enjoyable for developers and content managers alike”. This is a change in stride from WordPress which appeals to a much wider variety of people, so it should be interesting to see how that change affects Craft CMS as a whole.

The tutorial then walks you through the installation process for Craft and what the interface will look like when everything is set up correctly. He talks about the functionality that's immediately available and some places where he feels Craft "shines" in its features. He then goes through some of the core architecture of the tool, templating, plugins, custom fields, SEO, eCommerce support and the documentation/pricing the project offers.

tagged: wordpress alternative series part1 craftcms introduction installation

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/craft-cms-self-hosted-wordpress-alternatives/

Cal Evans:
My Journey Into Mautic
Jun 07, 2017 @ 09:09:32

Cal Evans, in a search to help make the marketing efforts for some of his products easier, has kicked off a series showing how to install and configure the PHP-based Mautic marketing automation platform.

Those that know me know that I have an obsession with marketing. I mean I’m no good at it, but the topic fascinates me. Almost all of the podcasts I listen to on a regular basis are marketing related. One topic in particular that interests me is “Marketing Automation”. Marketing Automation covers a huge swath of topics and since I am not an expert at the, I won’t attempt to explain them.

[...] Because I am interested in Marketing Automation and want to start applying the techniques in the projects I run. I started looking around for vendors who could provide these services. What I found is that most SaaS vendors assume that everybody who wants to use their software has deep pockets.

Without these "deep pockets" (pricey services) at his disposal, Cal looked for other options and found the self-hosted Mautic instead. He starts with a definition of his requirements including that it should be Open Source, that it should integrate with WordPress and he can contribute back to the project. He ends the post by outlining his planned platform using Mautic, WordPress, Mailgun, Mailchimp and Ditigal Ocean.

tagged: mautic marketing platform opensource series part1 automation

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2017/06/03/my-journey-into-mautic/

Zend Framework Blog:
Discover and Read RSS and Atom Feeds
Apr 07, 2017 @ 09:25:08

On the Zend Framework blog Matthew Weier O'Phinney has written up a new tutorial showing you how to discover and read RSS feeds with the help of the zend-feed component of the Zend Framework.

Remember RSS and Atom feeds? Chances are, you may be reading this because it was on a feed.

[...] An interesting fact: Atom itself is often used as a data transfer format for REST services, particularly content management platforms! As such, being familiar with feeds and having tools to work with them is an important skill for a web developer! In this first of a two part series on feeds, we'll look at feed discovery, as well as reading, using zend-feed's Reader subcomponent.

He gets started by installing the zendframework/zend-feed component with Composer and pulling in the zendframework/zend-http component to make the HTTP requests for the feeds. He then shares some code that helps with RSS/Atom feed discovery on a site and viewing the results. This list is then used as sources to import and code is shown that outputs the basic information about the feed. Finally he shows how to look through the entries in the feed and output the title, link and description of each.

tagged: series discover read parse rss atom feed zendframework zendfeed zendhttp tutorial part1

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-04-06-zend-feed-reading.html

Esben Petersen:
A modern REST API in Laravel 5 Part 1: Structure
Mar 09, 2017 @ 10:44:56

Esben Petersen has kicked off his series on creating a modern REST framework in Laravel 5 with part one in the series. This first tutorial focuses on the setup of the application using a "folders by component" approach.

Over time when your API grows in size it also grows in complexity. Many moving parts work together in order for it to function. If you do not employ a scaleable structure you will have a hard time maintaining your API. New additions will cause side effects and breakage in other places etc.

It is important to realize in software development no singular structure is the mother of all structures. It is important to build a toolbox of patterns which you can employ given different situations. This article will serve as an opinionated piece on how such a structure could look.

The tutorial covers structure on three different levels (patterns): application flow, project folder structure and resource folder structure. For each level they cover some of the basic concepts involved and share code showing how it could be implemented including controllers, repositories, middleware and fitting it all into a a resource folder structure.

tagged: laravel rest api laravel5 tutorial series part1 structure

Link: http://esbenp.github.io/2016/04/11/modern-rest-api-laravel-part-1/

Matthias Noback:
Containerizing a static website with Docker (Part 1 & 2)
Jan 06, 2017 @ 09:07:39

Matthias Noback has started a series to his site showing you how to use Docker along with a static site, like one generated with Sculpin to create a complete environment. So far he's posted part one and part two.

Recently a former colleague of mine, Lucas van Lierop, showed me his new website, which he created using Spress. Lucas took two bold moves: he started freelancing, and he open-sourced his website code. This to me was very inspiring. I've been getting up to speed with Docker recently and am planning to do a lot more with it over the coming months, and being able to take a look at the source code of up-to-date projects that use Docker is certainly invaluable.

Taking lots of inspiration from Lucas's codebase, and after several hours of fiddling with configuration files, I can now guide you through the steps it took to containerize my blog (which is the site you're visiting now) and deploy a single container to a production server.

In part one he talks about how his blog is currently set up - based on a "large set of Markdown files" - and using Sculpin to generate the resulting site. He walks through the configuration of the Sculpin installation and how to configure and build the initial container, the "build" container.

In part two he continues the process but creates a "blog" container this time. This container runs the web server itself (nginx) configured as required by the Sculpin formatting.

tagged: container docker static website tutorial series part1 part2

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/categories/Docker/

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 1
Nov 18, 2016 @ 13:57:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at autoloading in WordPress plugins. In this latest post the most from just the namespacing and setup into the actual code - creating some simple object-oriented classes that can be easily autoloaded.

I recently wrapped up a series in which I covered namespaces and autoloading in WordPress. If you're not familiar with either of the above terms, then I recommend checking out the series. [...] While working on the series, specifically that of the autoloader, I couldn't help but recognize a number of code smells that were being introduced as I was sharing the code with you.

This isn't to say the autoloader is bad or that it doesn't work. If you've downloaded the plugin, run it, or followed along and written your own autoloader, then you know that it does in fact work. But in a series that focuses on namespaces—something that's part and parcel of object-oriented programming—I couldn't help but feel uncomfortable leaving the autoloader in its final state at the end of the series.

They move away from just autoloading and namespacing quickly and move into OOP concepts like interfaces, implementing them, the "single-responsibility principle" and a few other helpful principles. They define the goals for the work ahead and move into the code, updating the current state of the plugin to use these new ideas.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part1 series interface singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-1--cms-27381

TutsPlus.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 1
Oct 21, 2016 @ 10:43:38

The TutsPlus.com site has posted a new tutorial for the WordPress developers out there showing you how to get started with namespacing and autoloading in your WordPress installation.

Namespaces and autoloading are not topics that are usually discussed when it comes to working with WordPress plugins. Some of this has to do with the community that's around it, some of this has to do with the versions of PHP that WordPress supports, and some of it simply has to do with the fact that not many people are talking about it. And that's okay, to an extent.

Neither namespaces nor autoloading are topics that you absolutely need to use to create plugins. They can, however, provide a better way to organize and structure your code as well as cut down on the number of require, require_once, include, or include_once statements that your plugins use.

The article then starts in by listing the things you'll need to have installed and working to follow along. It then talks about what they're going to help you build - a simple plugin that adds an "Inspirational quotes" widget to your post editor page. They walk you through the basic setup of the plugin, adding the box to the page and setting up the "questions.txt" file to pull the quotes from. Code is provided for each step including the creation of the "quote reader" class and the class to display the meta box.

tagged: namespace autoload wordpress plugin introduction part1 series quotes

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-part-1--cms-27157

TutsPlus.com:
Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1
Sep 23, 2016 @ 10:33:58

TutsPlus.com has started off a new series of posts for the WordPress users out there showing you how to build a "welcome page" for your WordPress site and product.

In the first two articles of this series, I wrote about what welcome pages are and how they are helping products improve user experience by connecting the dots, after which I wrote about the WordPress Transients API that I intend to use while building the welcome page.

Coding a welcome page for your WordPress plugin can be a tricky process. The entire concept revolves around redirecting users to a particular page via setting transients and finally deleting them. Let's start building the welcome page.

They walk you through the creation of a simple plugin that can be used to easily create (and re-create) these "welcome" pages (the final result is here for the impatient). The tutorial the starts off by defining the architecture of the plugin and the workflow that it will follow to generate the page. From there it gets into the code for the plugin itself and related supporting files including the "initializer" that activates the plugin, making it ready for use.

tagged: welcome page wordpress plugin series part1 tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/articles/building-a-welcome-page-for-your-wordpress-product-code-part-1--cms-26014

TutsPlus.com:
Building a WordPress-Powered Front End With the WP REST API and AngularJS: Intro & Set
Aug 05, 2016 @ 11:17:36

The TutsPlus.com site has kicked off a new tutorial series today with part one of a look at using the WordPress REST API and AngularJS to create an API-powered frontend application.

In this series about building a WordPress-powered front end with the WP REST API and AngularJS, we will put the knowledge acquired in the introductory series to use. We will learn how we can leverage this knowledge to decouple the conventional theme-admin model supported by WordPress until now. We will plan and build a single-page application (that I've named Quiescent) with a WordPress back end which will feature posts, users, and categories listing pages. We will configure AngularJS routing and build a custom directive and controllers for the resources mentioned above.

In this first part of the series they walk you through some of the planning steps before the application even gets written (including wireframes). From there they get a bare-bones HTML structure setup for the Angular app to live in and make a matching WordPress plugin. This plugin will return a featured image, author name, associated categories and image resize data related to a post. The code for the plugin is included.

tagged: wordpress api frontend angularjs tutorial plugin wireframe planning series part1

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-a-wordpress-powered-front-end-with-the-wp-rest-api-and-angularjs-introduction-and-setup--cms-26115