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Scotch.io:
Build a Time Tracker with Laravel 5 and AngularJS - Part 2
April 22, 2015 @ 09:38:53

Scotch.io has posted the second part of their series today showing you how to build a simple time tracking application with Laravel and AngularJS. In this latest part of the series he finishes the application and connect the two pieces.

This is the second of a two-part series on using Laravel 5 and AngularJS together to build a simple time tracking application. If you've gone through part 1, you'll have seen that we put together the front-end first and used a simple JSON file with some mocked-up data to test with. We left off with the ability to add new time entries and have the total time from all of them display on the side. We didn't include any way to edit or delete the time entries, and of course there was no persistence to a database. In this part we will complete the application so that the time entries get stored in a database and our Angular front-end and Laravel backend work together to create, read, update and delete from it.

He starts by helping you get a Laravel application up and running (time-tracker-2), set up the database and modify the configuration to point to the database location. He helps you run the migrations to set up the database tables and generate the related model code. Next up he shows how to inject the seed data, setting up the main index view and adding in routes for the Angular code to access. The rest of the article is just about as detailed and covers steps to:

  • View all the Available Routes
  • Return all Time Entries
  • Return All Users
  • Updating the front-end
  • Setting up the users list
  • Creating time entries
  • Updating time entries
  • Deleting time entires

Finally he wraps it all up with a few possible things that could be done to improve the application, both simple and a bit more complex. He challenges you the developer to implement those features.

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tutorial angularjs laravel series part2 time tracker application

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/build-a-time-tracker-with-laravel-5-and-angularjs-part-2

Phillip Shipley:
Creating a PHP Nexmo API Client using Guzzle Web Service Client - Part 2
April 09, 2015 @ 11:58:38

Phillip Shipley has posted the second part of his series (first part is here) about creating a PHP client for the Nexmo API with Guzzle, the popular PHP HTTP client.

In Part 1 of this series we laid a foundation for consuming the Nexmo SMS API and covered a few ways to interact with it. In this part we'll create the actual Guzzle Web Service Client to interact with it to demonstrate how simple it can be.

He starts by getting Guzzle installed via Composer including a few extra components: guzzle-services, retry-subscriber and log-subscriber. He defines the structure (code) for the message to send to the Nexmo service. Next up is the creation of the actual client that takes in configuration settings and extracts the HTTP location and applies the provided credentials to the connection. Finally he makes a simple SMS client that extends this base client and puts it to use with a simple message defined in an array (to, from and text contents). The client then reports back the results in a simple nested array with response information from the Nexmo API.

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nexmo client guzzle webservice api part2 series connect send

Link: http://www.phillipshipley.com/2015/04/creating-a-php-nexmo-api-client-using-guzzle-web-service-client-part-2/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Using Github Webhooks with PHP
April 08, 2015 @ 10:16:21

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted from Younes Rafie continuing their series about using the GitHub API from PHP. In this second part of the series he shows how to integrate the GitHub Webhooks with your applications.

In the first part of our series, we talked about the Github API and built a demo in the process. In this part we are going to explore the Webhooks API, and we will build a demo to showcase the API usage.

The demo application they set up gets a push request from the GitHub API and save the resulting data to a local database. They use Laravel 5 to build the application but it could easily be in any other framework (or just plain PHP). They're also deploying to Heroku, but again, you can use your own service. The article then shows you how to go and register a webhook in the repository on the GitHub site and create the "hooks" table to store the event name and contents of the request. He makes use of a JSON output route and the ChartsJs library to render a simple bar graph of the contributors to the repository based on the number of commits they've made.

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tutorial series part2 github webhooks api laravel5 chartsjs json

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/using-github-webhooks-php/

Hailoapp.com:
A Journey into Microservices
March 11, 2015 @ 11:23:34

On the Hailo.com blog Matt Heath has posted a series of articles about their transition from a "monolith" codebase out into a set of microservices for the Hallo app system.

Hailo, like many startups, started small; small enough that our offices were below deck on a boat in central London - the HMS President. Working on a boat as a small focused team, we built out our original apps and APIs using tried and tested technologies, including Java, PHP, MySQL and Redis, all running on Amazon's EC2 platform. [...] After we launched in London, and then Dublin, we expanded from one continent to two, and then three; launching first in North America, and then in Asia. This posed a number of challenges-the main one being locality of customer data.

They describe this customer data problem in a bit more detail with the issue mostly revolving around the geolocation of the user and their information. They talk about "going global" and the steps they took to make the move. In the three parts of the series, they explain the changes they made and why they were effective for their application:

They end the series with some links to other resources that help compliment the subjects mentioned and link to slides from a presentation around the same topic.

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microservice journey series part1 part2 part3 introduction architecture api halloapp

Link: https://sudo.hailoapp.com/services/2015/03/09/journey-into-a-microservice-world-part-1/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Commenting, Upvoting and Uploading Photos with the 500px API
March 10, 2015 @ 11:55:46

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series creating a simple application based on the 500px service with part two, commenting, upvoting and uploading photos. The 500px service is a photo community for discovering, sharing, buying and selling inspiring photography powered by creative people worldwide.

In the first part of this series we used the API to get the latest photos from 500px and filter through them, and we built a user profile with the list of associated photos. In this part, we are going to give the user the ability to vote, favorite and comment on photos, and finally, we will give the users the ability to upload their own photos.

They start with a look at authentication and authorization handling to make the OAuth-based request to the 500px API. Code is included for the connecting class, including the addition of a logger to make debugging the requests simpler. From there they set up the routes for handling votes on photos (PHP and Javascript) and marking favorite photos. They also include the functionality for adding comments, getting the latest comments and uploading new photos to the service. The final resulting code can be found over on GitHub.

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500px tutorial api series part2 comment upvote upload photos

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/commenting-upvoting-uploading-photos-500px-api/

NetTuts.com:
When You're Hacked in WordPress Staying Safe Later On
February 20, 2015 @ 14:19:00

NetTuts.com has posted the second part in their "When You're Hacked - WordPress" tutorial series today with this new article showing you how to stay safe once you've recovered from the initial attack.

n the first part of this series, we went through what to do when your website gets hacked. In this second part, we're going to learn about staying safe and being able to act quickly when another unpleasant incident happens.

They start by answering the overarching question everyone wants to know about WordPress (as it relates to security) - "is it safe?" They follow this with some recommendations to help keep your install safe including:

  • Staying Up to Date
  • Using Safe Plugins & Themes
  • Using a Security-Related WordPress Plugin

Check out the rest of the article for the full list and a quick summary of each, some with links to the actual tools and plugins to help you protect your installation.

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wordpress hack stay safe tutorial series part2 recommendation

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/when-youre-hacked-in-wordpress-staying-safe-later-on--cms-22748

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Adding Social Network Features to a PHP App with Neo4j
February 18, 2015 @ 12:06:38

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series about combining PHP and the Neo4j graph database with part two, adding social features to the code they created in part one.

In the last part, we learned about Neo4j and how to use it with PHP. In this post, we'll be using that knowledge to build a real Silex-powered social network application with a graph database.

Author Christophe Willemsen dives right back into the code showing how to get the basic application up and running (using Silex, Twig, Bootstrap and the NeoClient). He loads the PHP libraries up via Composer and injects the NeoClient instance into the application. He includes the view and controller handling for each of the pages:

  • a main all user list
  • showing who a user follows
  • listing suggested users (who to follow)
  • adding a relationship

Screenshots are also included to show the example output along with all the code you'll need.

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tutorial series part2 social feature neo4j neoclient

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/adding-social-network-features-php-app-neo4j/

NetTuts.com:
Programming With Yii2 Exploring MVC, Forms and Layouts
February 03, 2015 @ 11:10:38

NetTuts.com has posted the latest part of their "Programming with Yii2" series today that dives deeper into the functionality of the framework and investigates the use of MVC forms and layouts.

In Programming with Yii2: Getting Started, we set up Yii2 locally, built a Hello World application, set up a remote server, and used Github to deploy our code. This tutorial will cover some of Yii's more basic concepts related to its implementation of the MVC framework: Models, Views and Controllers. We'll also explore layouts and customization of navigation menus and Bootstrap elements.

They start with a look at the model functionality Yii2 has to offer and creates a first simple model, the "Status" model, to evaluate permission status. Next up is a simple controller, one that handles incoming status requests and either creates the record or displays the information in the model. Next is the output part of the application with examples of view handling, forms and layouts.

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tutorial yii2 framework series part2 mvc form layout introduction

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/programming-with-yii2-exploring-mvc-forms-and-layouts--cms-22682

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Configuring Your Store's Settings with the eBay Trading API
January 12, 2015 @ 11:18:22

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the next article in their "eBay Trading API" tutorial series today. In this new tutorial they show you how to configure your store's settings.

In part 1, we explained the different parts of eBay's developer dashboard and configured our test application. We also created our database. Now we're ready to create a project. In this part, we'll focus on store settings. In part 3, we'll add new products to our store.

They include the "composer.json" contents you'll need to install all of the libraries they'll use for the tutorial. With those installed they start in on the code, creating a basic Slim application that uses Twig views and some custom configuration options. Then he starts in on the classes, creating an "Ebay" class to handle the application settings and creating a "post" method to handle the API request. He adds in a few other helper methods and builds a database object/query to get the application details from the database. Next up are the templates for the main page and the controller to handle the default, session and token requests. He adds in some additional route configurations, makes a "view action" for the store settings and to request the user preferences from the API.

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configure store setting ebay trading api series part2

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/configuring-stores-settings-ebay-trading-api/

NetTuts.com:
Building With the Twitter API Tweet Storms
January 07, 2015 @ 12:49:22

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series about creating a Twitter client on top of the Yii framework. In this new tutorial they focus on "tweet storms", the use of a series of tweets to share a thought rather than just cramming it into one.

In April, investor and Netscape founder Marc Andreessen began expanding on the natural 140 character limits of Twitter by publishing his thoughts in sequences of tweets, which some have dubbed tweet storms. [...] A few services arose to make it easier for mere mortals like ourselves to publish tweet storms but they seemed a bit unreliable and inconsistent. I decided to build the feature myself and I think there's value in doing this with your own app.

He outlines the features that the "tweet storm" feature needs to support and the database models/migrations that you'll need to store the related data. He uses Yii's generators to create the needed skeleton classes for the models and controllers. He moves on to the code needed to handle the group tweets management and to compose the tweets that will make up the "storm". Finally, he includes the code you'll need to create the publishing feature, pushing it into both the models/database and out to the Twitter API. You can then use the "OEmbed" information provided by Twitter to view the series of tweets via another simple page (code included here too).

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tutorial twitter storm multiple tweet yii framework series part2

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-with-the-twitter-api-tweet-storms--cms-22459


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