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Delicious Brains:
WordPress Deployment Part 3: Deploying WordPress Using Git
Aug 14, 2018 @ 09:37:04

The Delicious Brains site has continued their series covering WordPress deployment with part three: Deploying WordPress Using Git. While their instructions relate to WordPress, the examples given would work for any PHP-based application.

In my last article, we looked at deploying WordPress using some different command line (CLI) tools. In this article, we’re going to look at how we can deploy WordPress using Git, both manually via the CLI and also automatically when you push code to your remote repository.

They start by listing out the tooling you'll need to follow along - Git and Composer - and an example repository you can work from. The post then walk through three different methods you can use to deploy making use of Git:

  • a "git pull" on the production server
  • automated deployment via webhooks
  • deployment using a continuous integration service

For each item there's a brief summary included as well as configurations, screenshots and setup instructions.

tagged: wordpress deployment series part3 git composer tutorial

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/wordpress-deployment-workflow-git/

TutsPlus.com:
Get Started With Pusher - Using Private Channels
Aug 09, 2018 @ 11:56:46

TutsPlus.com has posted the next part of their series covering the use of "channels" with Pusher, the real-time messaging service. In the previous article they introduced Pusher and its "channels" functionality to build a simple real-time chat. In this new tutorial they show how to modify this application to use private channels.

n this series, we've been learning about Channels from Pusher, a platform that allows you to give your users the seamless real-time experience they want.

Private channels provide your applications with a secure, private medium for publishing messages. The best part is how easy it is to implement and use private channels for your apps.

Much like the previous article, they've included a screencast of the entire process right along side the text version. The tutorial walks you through setting up the server (the ChannelsController), the endpoint for client authorization and the changes to make to the client itself.

tagged: pusher private channel private tutorial series part2

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/get-started-with-pusher-using-private-channels--cms-31253

Pascal Landau:
Setting up PhpStorm with Xdebug for local development on Docker
Aug 08, 2018 @ 12:44:30

Following up from his previous post about setting up Docker running PHP-FPM and Nginx on Windows 10, Pascal Landau has published the second part of the series taking things a step further and introducing (and integrating) PhpStorm and Xdebug for local development debugging.

In the second part of this tutorial series on developing PHP on Docker we're taking a good hard look at PhpStorm, Xdebug and how to run and debug scripts from within PhpStorm on Docker.

[...] The setup that I am going to use is for demonstration purposes only! I do not recommend that you use it "as is" as your development setup. [...] There will be a another part of this series that will deal with all of those (and some more common) problems and aims at providing a consistent development environment for all developers in a team (regardless of the OS they are using).

He then walks through the process from setup through actual script debugging:

  • setting up the Docker containers/configuration
  • allowing the PHP container to connect over port 2375
  • running a PHP script on this container
  • building a "workspace" container for Xdebug

For each step he provides the configuration changes needed, commands and screenshots of the settings panels to ensure its easy to follow along.

tagged: docker phpfpm nginx debugging phpstorm xdebug tutorial series part2

Link: https://www.pascallandau.com/blog/setup-phpstorm-with-xdebug-on-docker/

Tomas Votruba:
Stylish and Standard Console Output with Symfony Style
Aug 07, 2018 @ 10:28:12

Tomas Votruba has continued his series covering the use of the Symfony Console component with a new tutorial. In this latest article he shows how to get "stylish and standard console output" using the output formatting included with the package.

Even if you don't use any component from Symfony or even installed one, you can use this trick in your PHP CLI App.

It's simple, provides standard and makes your output look like a design from Apple - useful and nice at the same time.

He starts by introducing the OutputInterface that the Symfony Console package includes and shows a few screenshots of the difference between normal console output and the Console component's look. He also covers the SymfonyStyle functionality that allows for even more fine-grained control over the input and output handling of your application. He finishes the post showing a few tips on integrating these styles into your command line application and setting it up to fetch SymfonyStyle as a service.

tagged: symfony console component tutorial series style output input

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2018/08/06/stylish-and-standard-console-output-with-symfony-style/

Contentful Blog:
An extremely picky developer's take on static site generators for PHP: Part 2 - Jig
Aug 03, 2018 @ 10:50:23

On the Contentful blog they've posted the second part of their series reviewing static site generators for PHP. In this new article they look at Jigsaw, a Laravel-based tool.

In the first article of the series we took a look at Sculpin, the PHP static site generator which is currently the most starred on Github. Today we’re exploring Jigsaw, a tool which promises to bring a Laravel-based approach to the world of PHP static site generators (SSGs).

The author starts by sharing some about his (somewhat limited) experience with Laravel. From there he dives right in, showing the creation of a new Jigsaw site including configuration and how to serve it up locally. It then gets into detail about the directory structure of the site, asset handling and adding new content. The post ends by answering the "is it ready" question for their own needs (at Contentful).

tagged: static site generator review series part2 jigsaw

Link: https://www.contentful.com/blog/2018/08/01/extremely-picky-developers-take-php-static-site-generators-part-2-jigsaw/

Delicious Brains:
Hosting WordPress Yourself - Ongoing WordPress Server Optimization & Maintenance
Jul 31, 2018 @ 09:36:54

The Delicious Brains site has posted the final part of their "Hosting WordPress Yourself" series to their site. In this latest tutorial they cover ongoing maintenance tasks for your server to keep it running smoothly and secure.

So you’ve followed our in-depth guide and built yourself a shiny new server that’s secure and tuned for optimal WordPress performance, but what’s next? In this installment of Hosting WordPress Yourself, I’m going to outline a few tasks that should be carried out on a regular basis to ensure that your server continues to run securely and perform well. We’ll look at performing software updates, upgrading PHP, and a few “gotchas” to watch out for that we may have experienced ourselves. Let’s dive straight in!

The article is broken up into several sections, each with a summary providing a bit more background:

  • Keep Plugins and Themes Updated
  • Check Backups are Running
  • Keep an Eye on Server Metrics
  • Watch Those Log Files
  • Update Server Packages
  • Upgrade PHP

They also talk about upgrading the OS itself (Ubuntu) and how to outline an action plan that, when used regularly, can keep your system and software up-to-date easily.

tagged: wordpress hosting guide tutorial series part11 ongoing maintenance

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/hosting-wordpress-yourself-server-maintenance/

StarTutorial.com:
Understanding Design Patterns - Adapter
Jul 23, 2018 @ 10:47:19

The StarTutorial site has posted the next article in their series introducing various design patterns and their use in PHP. In their latest tutorial they cover the Adapter pattern, a useful pattern for putting a unified interface in front of various functionality.

[The Adapter pattern] converts the interface of a class into another interface the clients expect. Adapter lets class work together that couldn’t otherwise because of incompatible interfaces.

In their example they talk about a traveller wanting to charge their devices but being frustrated by the different plugs around the world. This is where an adapter comes in handy, providing a standard method for interaction (the input plug) with a wide range of backend tools (the plugs all around the world). They use this example and built out "plug" and "socket" classes where the adapter class acts as a go-between for the plug and receptacle.

tagged: designpattern tutorial series adapter

Link: https://www.startutorial.com/articles/view/understanding-design-patterns-adapter

Matt Sparks:
Building a PHP Framework: Part 7 – The Container
Jul 09, 2018 @ 12:33:16

Matt Sparks has posted the next tutorial in his "Building a PHP framework" series to his site today. In this latest article (part seven in the series) he focuses on building the container to handle dependencies.

Part 6 began our discussion of PHP containers. Today, I’ll be going into greater detail of the subject and, along with that, I’ll run down the work done so far on the Analyze container.

A huge debt of gratitude goes how to the folks behind the PHP League Container and others. I’ve learned a ton studying their code.

He then walks through the use of the container he created, Analyze/Container, to create and extract a Carbon instance. He then covers how the container is working behind the scenes to initialize the instance complete with dependencies (and optional arguments).

tagged: series part7 build framework container dependency tutorial

Link: https://developmentmatt.com/building-a-php-framework-part-7-the-container/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How To Boost Your Server Performance With Varnish
Jul 06, 2018 @ 09:20:23

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the latest tutorial in their series creating a simple image gallery application with a focus on performance. In this latest article they cover the use of Varnish for output and page caching.

According to Pingdom.com, a company focused on web performance, in 2012 Varnish was already famous among the world’s top websites for its capacity to speed up web delivery.

[...] Although there are other solutions that also shine, Varnish is still a go-to solution that can dramatically improve website speed, reduce the strain on the web application server’s CPU, and even serve as a protection layer from DDoS attacks. KeyCDN recommends deploying it on the origin server stack.

Varnish can sit on a dedicated machine in case of more demanding websites, and make sure that the origin servers aren’t affected by the flood of requests.

The article starts by explaining a bit about how Varnish (and caching in general) works to help improve the performance for the end user. It also goes through some of the basics feature of Varnish including threaded executions, extensibility and its domain-specific language. The tutorial then walks you through the installation of Varnish on a linux-based machine and shares some example stats showing the difference between normal requests and when Varnish is enabled for the image gallery application.

tagged: server performance varnish tutorial series imagegallery optimization

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-boost-your-server-performance-with-varnish/

Laracasts.com:
Learn Laravel Forge (Free Video Course)
Jul 04, 2018 @ 11:51:47

On the Laravel News site there's a post announcing a course from the Laracasts.com site (a video tutorial site targeted towards Laravel) covering the use of Laravel Forge, the community's server management and deployment platform.

Learn Laravel Forge is new video course on Laracasts teaching you all things Forge, by guest instructor Marcel Pociot! The course consists of over twenty free videos walking you through configuring servers with Laravel Forge.

Topics covered in the 20+ videos include:

  • creating a first Forge project
  • provisioning a load balancer
  • customizing PHP settings
  • configuring firewalls
  • using Forge recepies
  • setting up SSL
  • using the Forge API

Each of the videos runs anywhere from 3 minutes to about 9 minutes so they're definitely "bite sized" and easy to consume when you have a few extra minutes.

tagged: laracasts video tutorial series laravelforge course free

Link: https://laracasts.com/series/learn-laravel-forge