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Mark Baker:
Discharging Static #2
Apr 05, 2018 @ 10:22:09

Mark Baker continues his series looking at the use of static properties and methods in applications and how to test them. In this second part of the series he focuses more on some of the unintentional side-effects that could happen when you're trying to refactor them out.

In the first article in this series, I wrote about the problems with testing static methods in classes, and showed a few approaches that allow us to write mocks for statics. Testing classes where we have static properties is a lot harder to manage, because any changes made in any test to those properties are global, across the entire test suite, not simply the test that we are running. Static properties are part of the global state, and we can’t simply tearDown() those changes in the way that we do with instances — at least we cannot easily do so if the property has a visibility of private or protected.

He goes through an example of a refactor from a static property (essentially in the global scope) to a private property. He points out the issue of setting a static value in what seem to be separate child classes, the fact that it actually changes the base value, not the individual ones, leading to potentially unintended consequences.

His main recommendation is to avoid the use of static properties all together. Where that's no possible (like in a legacy project) he offers two potential solutions: either replace them with constants if they're never changed or changing them to instance properties.

tagged: static property series part2 refactor consequences testing

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2018/04/03/discharging-static-2/

Auth0 Blog:
Symfony Tutorial: Building a Blog (Part 3)
Mar 27, 2018 @ 11:20:06

The Auth0 blog has posted the third part of their "Building a Blog" series of tutorials showing the use of their authentication technologies coupled with a Symfony framework backend. In this latest article author Greg Holmes shows how to deploy the application created in parts one and two to Heroku.

Symfony is a PHP framework as well as a set of reusable PHP components and libraries. It uses the Model-View-Controller design pattern and can be scaled to be used in any requirement. It aims to speed up the creation and maintenance of web applications, replacing repetitive code. In this part of the series, you will learn how to deploy the blog engine that you have created in the previous parts on Heroku. The final code can be found at this repository.

He starts with a bit of catching up, briefly covering the contents of the first two articles before getting into the main content of this third. He covers some of the basics of Heroku and Travis-CI before getting into the actual deployment flow. He then helps you set up a GitHub account (used as a source for the deployment), set up a local MySQL database for testing and the installation of a few required dependencies. Next is the installation of the Heroku and Travis-CI command line tools, the configuration for each and some basic setup steps for each service.

Finally, he gets back to the Symfony application, setting up a few additional options in the Composer configuration to create a few commands. These commands are then executed as a part of the deployment process. There's also changes to the Symfony configuration files to reference the environment rather than a local path in several locations. The post ends with the setup instructions on the Auth0 side to allow handling to work from the newly deployed Heroku instance.

tagged: auth0 blog symfony tutorial series part3 deploy heroku

Link: https://auth0.com/blog/symfony-tutorial-building-a-blog-part-3/

Christoph Rumpel:
Build a newsletter chatbot in PHP - Part 3
Mar 27, 2018 @ 10:57:24

Christoph Rumpel has continued his series covering the creation of a chatbot using the Botman package in a new post to his site. The latest post, part three in the series, builds on the base created in parts one and two and integrates the bot with his project website.

In part one and two we created a Facebook Messenger chatbot that let your users subscribe to your newsletter. We stored that information in the database and sent out our first newsletter. In the last third part, we integrate this bot to a website and write our first tests.

He then walks you through the process of using the Facebook Customer Chat Plugin to integrate it into the site (using the Facebook JavaScript SDK). He includes instructions on whitelisting your domain and including the plugin into the site's source using a few custom configuration options. With the integration complete he then takes a step back and shows the creation of several tests evaluating the fallback handling and subscription conversation responses.

tagged: chatbot tutorial series part3 integrate facebook testing fallback subscribe

Link: https://christoph-rumpel.com/2018/03/build-a-newsletter-chatbot-in-php-part-3

Pehapkari.cz:
Domain-Driven Design - Alternative Relational Database Mapping
Mar 21, 2018 @ 10:37:16

The Pehapkari.cz blog has continued their series covering domain-driven design with the latest post in the series showing some alternative relational database mapping techniques.

Do you think that multilingual text must always be in a separate database table? Than this article is for you!

We will show that not all arrays have to be mapped as database tables. And we will also show the Doctrine implementation.

The article starts with a bit of background on what they're trying to accomplish: adding internationalization functionality to an e-commerce application. In order to make it simpler to work with the multi-language requirements they show the abstraction of its handling out into a LangValue value object that's used to store the product name value for each language. They then use this and some JSON encoded data to store the different language strings in the database directly with the product record rather than a different table. It then shows how to create the matching Doctrine entity for the LangValueType to work with the serialized column data and extract data from it's JSON blob.

tagged: domaindrivendesign series part4 relational database mapping internationalization doctrine

Link: https://pehapkari.cz/blog/2018/03/21/domain-driven-design-alternative-mapping/

Sergey Zhuk:
Amp Promises: Using Router With ReactPHP Http Component
Mar 13, 2018 @ 09:25:37

Sergey Zhuk has a post on his site that covers using a Router with a ReactPHP component. This router lets you more easily direct the HTTP requests coming into the application to the correct piece of functionality.

Router defines the way your application responds to a client request to a specific endpoint which is defined by URI (or path) and a specific HTTP request method (GET, POST, etc.). With ReactPHP Http component we can create an asynchronous web server. But out of the box the component doesn’t provide any routing, so you should use third-party libraries in case you want to create a web-server with a routing system.

He starts with an example of manual routing, showing the code for a basic server and adding in handlers based on the path+HTTP verb to respond with different content. He expands this basic example out to a more "real world" situation of the usual CRUD handling for "tasks". The post then shows how to change things up and use the FastRoute routing package to remove the manual route definitions from the server and define them in the router instead. It can then dispatch these to the correct location more easily. The post finishes up showing an additional feature: how to use wildcards in these URL definitions.

tagged: reactphp server http router fastroute tutorial series

Link: http://sergeyzhuk.me/2018/03/13/using-router-with-reactphp-http/

Matthias Noback:
Mocking at architectural boundaries: the filesystem and randomness
Mar 06, 2018 @ 09:39:55

Matthias Noback has continued his series of posts covering mocking and testing at the "architectural boundaries" of your application. In this second post he offers two more suggestions of these "edges" where mocking could be useful: filesystem interfaces and randomness.

In a previous article, we discussed "persistence" and "time" as boundary concepts that need mocking by means of dependency inversion: define your own interface, then provide an implementation for it. There were three other topics left to cover: the filesystem, the network and randomness.

He starts with the mocking of the filesystem handling and makes the recommendation of using either vfsStreamor Flysystem to provide an interface that's more easily testable. These libraries abstract away the filesystem and make it easier to mock out the functionality rather than going directly to PHP's filesystem functions. His second example, randomness, is a bit tougher as the output isn't predictable. He still recommends abstracting it out, however, and offers suggestions as to what might be possible to test.

tagged: mocking boarder architecture filesystem randomness series part2

Link: https://matthiasnoback.nl/2018/03/mocking-the-filesystem-and-randomness/

Laravel News:
Real-time messaging with Nexmo and Laravel
Mar 05, 2018 @ 10:28:04

The Laravel News site has posted the third part of their series about the construction of helpdesk software. In this latest article they integrate Nexmo for real-time messaging using Nexmo Stitch.

Welcome back to the third and final (for now!) part of the Deskmo series. In Part 2 added support for voice calls, with text-to-speech and transcription support.

Today, we’re going to add in-app messaging using Nexmo Stitch. Stitch takes care of all of the heavy lifting for real-time chat, providing you with a websocket that you connect to and listen for events relating to your application.

The article starts by listing out some prerequisites (a Nexmo client account and the Deskmo project) as well as an installation of the Nexmo Stitch command-line client. It then walks you through the process of setting up a Nexmo user profile for each user in the helpdesk software and updating the database with this new information. It then shows how to add in-app notification messaging and linking the messages and tickets together with a conversation ID. With Stitch installed you can then create the chat interface and link the backend to the Nexmo service as a user easily sending and receiving messages.

tagged: realtime message laravel nexmo helpdesk tutorial series part3

Link: https://laravel-news.com/real-time-messaging-nexmo-laravel

Pehapkari.cz:
Domain-Driven Design - Repository
Mar 02, 2018 @ 11:46:25

The Pehapkari.cz site has continued their series on domain-driven design with their latest tutorial covering the use of a repository for handling instances and collections of objects.

We will discuss how to store and read domain objects while pretending we have an in-memory system. Simply, we will show how to implement and test repository.

The article starts with a look at collections and the reality of using them outside of an in-memory environment. It then focuses in on the idea of a repository that live in the domain layer and some of the responsibilities they have as a part of the overall system. With the basics defined the tutorial then gets into the concrete implementation of the repository and how to write effective tests to ensure its correct functionality.

tagged: domaindrivendesign series part3 repository tutorial

Link: https://pehapkari.cz/blog/2018/02/28/domain-driven-design-repository/

Christoph Rumpel:
Build a newsletter chatbot in PHP (Part 1 & 2)
Mar 02, 2018 @ 09:56:21

On his site has posted parts one and two of a series showing how to build a chatbot that can help provide more direct interaction with your users via a "newsletter" feature.

Since the beginning of the year, I am working on a new project of mine. It's a book called Build Chatbots with PHP. Follow the link to find out what it is about and who it is for.

More interesting to us is the newsletter, to which you can subscribe on the book's website. About once or twice a month I will send out an email with news on the development of the book.

He starts part one by outlining the general plan and functionality for the bot and its integration with Facebook. The tutorial then walks through the installation and configuration of the BotMan Studio project. It also shows the setup of the application on the Facebook service and how to connect it to the BotMan application. He walks through the setup of a few commands to welcome the user and start the conversation. Part two continues the process showing how to store the user and subscription information and how to send the newsletter notifications. He also makes some suggestions of extra functionality you might want to add like a typing indicator, a "fallback" for unknown commands.

tagged: introduction part2 part1 series tutorial chatbot newsletter facebook

Link: https://christoph-rumpel.com/2018/02/build-a-newsletter-chatbot-in-php-part-1

Tomas Votruba:
Rector: Part 2 - Maturity of PHP Ecosystem and Founding Fathers
Feb 26, 2018 @ 11:23:30

Tomas Votruba has posted the second part of his Reactor series on his site today. In part one he covered some of the basics of the Ractor package (a CLI tool that provides some handy helper functions for Symfony applications). In part two he covers some of the "founding fathers" and packages that he built the package on top of.

You already know What Rector does and How it works from part 1.

It's not that PHP didn't need to be updated until 2017. I surely could delegate hundreds of upgrade-hours for my whole career. So why Now?

The post then talks about the idea of "codemod" functionality like the PHP CS Fixer that changes code to bring it up to PSR-2 compliance. It then covers the package that's one of the keys to the Reactor project, the nikic/PHP-Parser package. He talks about the read/write functionality, an example of a change it might make and finishes by thanking the "founding fathers" that made those packages available.

tagged: reactor part2 series ecosystem phpcodesniffer phpcsfixer ast nikicphpparser refactor

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2018/02/26/rector-part-2-maturity-of-php-ecocystem-and-founding-fathers/