Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Delicious Brains:
Hosting WordPress Yourself 2018 Update
Jun 13, 2018 @ 09:33:33

The Delicious Brains site has posted an update for the last part (10 of 10) of their series providing a guide to hosting WordPress yourself for some smaller changes for doing it in 2018.

I originally started writing Hosting WordPress Yourself back in February 2015, which makes this series over three years old! During that time a lot has changed, which is why I updated the series just over 12 months ago, to keep the content relevant. Since then, even more has changed in the WordPress hosting scene, so it’s time for another update!

I have already updated the existing articles in this series with the changes that follow. This article serves as a changelog and documents what has changed in each part of this series, where I guide you through the process of building a complete server to house your WordPress sites

This update shares changes in the virtual server setup, new software releases, suggestions of server monitoring services and web server configuration changes. Each point in the list is also linked back to the other part of the series related to the changes to give more context.

tagged: wordpress hosting guide tutorial series 2018 update

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/hosting-wordpress-yourself-2018-update/

Symfony Blog:
New in Symfony 4.1: Misc. improvements (Parts 1-4)
May 30, 2018 @ 13:18:05

On the Symfony project blog they've posted a series of articles covering some miscellaneous improvements made for the v4.1 release of the framework.

During the past months we've published almost 40 blog posts about the main new features of Symfony 4.1. In this article you'll find some of the other small but nice new features.

Here's the list of the posts and some of the things covered in each:

  • Part 1: CSRF without forms, visibility change in progress bar component, showing dotenv files in the profiler
  • Part 2: command to delete cache pool items, allowing custom functions in "allow_if" expressions, addition of "dd" debug helper
  • Part 3: add/remove LDAP attributes efficiently, keeping the query string after redirect, hasser accessors in PropertyInfo
  • Part 4: adding anonymous services in PHP DSL, support for extracting type from constructor, configurable PHP error log level

Check out each post for a brief summary of each change and example code/configuration showing how to make use of it.

tagged: symfony improvement v41 series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://symfony.com/blog/new-in-symfony-4-1-misc-improvements-part-1

Matt Sparks:
Building a PHP Framework: Part 5 – Test Driven Development
May 30, 2018 @ 12:55:12

Matt Sparks has posted the latest tutorial in his "Building a PHP framework" series of posts. In this latest article he covers the use of test-driven development during the development of some of the first framework code.

In part 4 we laid the foundation for Analyze. Now it’s time to write the very first lines of code! [...] Essentially, test driven development is a process of writing tests before writing any code, then writing code that passes the tests. [...] If you’re new to TDD, this probably seems pretty weird. Stick with me.

He starts with a brief definition of what test-driven development (TDD) is and what tool he'll be using to create the tests. Next is a simple example of a test that creates a class instance (NumberAdder) and calls an add method on it. This fails because none of this exists yet, hence the "test first" part of TDD. He then goes back and creates the class and method and loads them so the test can use them.

tagged: build framework tutorial series part5 tdd testdriven development

Link: https://developmentmatt.com/building-a-php-framework-part-5-test-driven-development/

Matt Sparks:
Building a PHP Framework Series (Parts 1-4)
May 16, 2018 @ 12:50:42

On this site Matt Sparks has posted the first few parts of a series covering the creation of a custom framework. Why? Well, as he explains in part one of the series:

So with all of that being said, it begs the question: why on Earth would you want to do this?

The extremely short answer: I want to. The less short answer: A PHP framework encompasses many of the areas I want to learn more about.

The first four posts of the series are already on his site (with more to come):

Matt does a great job of laying out some of the fundamentals behind frameworks including structure, design patterns, and commonalities between frameworks. You can follow along with his progress on the project on the AnalyzePHP GitHub repositories.

tagged: build framework tutorial series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://developmentmatt.com/building-a-php-framework-part-4-the-foundation/

StarTutorial.com:
Understanding Design Patterns - Template Method
May 15, 2018 @ 13:07:06

The StarTutorial.com site has continued their series covering common design patterns and their implementation in PHP. In their latest article they cover the Template Method pattern.

[This pattern] defines the skeleton of an algorithm in a method, deferring some steps to subclasses. Template Method lets subclasses redefine certain steps of an algorithm without changing the algorithm’s structure.

In their example, they have two workers that have different schedules but with one difference. Instead of having implementations that differ widely between the two workers (represented by classes) they refactor the main class and allow for a doWork method to be defined in the child. This makes the parent class a sort of "template" for handling the processing with the child filling in the blanks.

tagged: designpattern tutorial template method series

Link: https://www.startutorial.com/articles/view/understanding-design-patterns-template-method

Delicious Brains:
WordPress Deployment Part 1: Preparing WordPress
May 09, 2018 @ 11:05:12

The Delicious Brains blog has kicked off a new series of posts walking you through the deployment of a WordPress site with automated (and repeatable) deployments.

Welcome to the first post in a workflow series on deploying WordPress. In this series, we’re going to look at how you can set up automated deployments for your WordPress site in a range of different ways.

They start off by answering the question of "why" for automated deployments. They make the point that automated deployments can help reduce the potential for human error, increase the reliability of the deployments and have many more benefits. Next they start in on the preparation work, helping you get several prerequisites set up before getting to the deployment process:

  • Setting up the site on an accessible Git repository and having plugins/dependencies managed by Composer
  • Deploying configuration files
  • Disable FTP Access & File Editing
  • Disable Auto Updates

The post also includes a section covering the deployment of the database for your application and any other media you might have related to it (images, files, etc).

tagged: wordpress deployment series part1 preparation

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/wordpress-deployment-workflow-preparing/

Laravel News:
Laracasts: What’s New in Laravel 5.6
May 02, 2018 @ 11:54:59

On the Laravel News site they've posted information about a series of videos on the Laracasts site covering what's new in Laravel 5.6.

Laravel 5.6 has been for a few weeks now and it includes a few nice new features like Broadcast Channel Classes, Collision Reporting, Improved Logging, and more.

In order to get you up to speed on all these new features, Laracasts has started a new free series, “What’s new in Laravel 5.6” that will go through each major feature of this release.

The series includes videos covering how they upgraded the Laracasts' codebase to 5.6, collision reporting, logging improvements and dynamic rate limiting. More videos will be added to the series as it goes along. You can check out the current listing of videos on the Laracasts site.

tagged: laravel release feature laravel56 video laracast series

Link: https://laravel-news.com/laracasts-whats-new-in-laravel-5-6

Mark Baker:
Discharging Static #2
Apr 05, 2018 @ 10:22:09

Mark Baker continues his series looking at the use of static properties and methods in applications and how to test them. In this second part of the series he focuses more on some of the unintentional side-effects that could happen when you're trying to refactor them out.

In the first article in this series, I wrote about the problems with testing static methods in classes, and showed a few approaches that allow us to write mocks for statics. Testing classes where we have static properties is a lot harder to manage, because any changes made in any test to those properties are global, across the entire test suite, not simply the test that we are running. Static properties are part of the global state, and we can’t simply tearDown() those changes in the way that we do with instances — at least we cannot easily do so if the property has a visibility of private or protected.

He goes through an example of a refactor from a static property (essentially in the global scope) to a private property. He points out the issue of setting a static value in what seem to be separate child classes, the fact that it actually changes the base value, not the individual ones, leading to potentially unintended consequences.

His main recommendation is to avoid the use of static properties all together. Where that's no possible (like in a legacy project) he offers two potential solutions: either replace them with constants if they're never changed or changing them to instance properties.

tagged: static property series part2 refactor consequences testing

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2018/04/03/discharging-static-2/

Auth0 Blog:
Symfony Tutorial: Building a Blog (Part 3)
Mar 27, 2018 @ 11:20:06

The Auth0 blog has posted the third part of their "Building a Blog" series of tutorials showing the use of their authentication technologies coupled with a Symfony framework backend. In this latest article author Greg Holmes shows how to deploy the application created in parts one and two to Heroku.

Symfony is a PHP framework as well as a set of reusable PHP components and libraries. It uses the Model-View-Controller design pattern and can be scaled to be used in any requirement. It aims to speed up the creation and maintenance of web applications, replacing repetitive code. In this part of the series, you will learn how to deploy the blog engine that you have created in the previous parts on Heroku. The final code can be found at this repository.

He starts with a bit of catching up, briefly covering the contents of the first two articles before getting into the main content of this third. He covers some of the basics of Heroku and Travis-CI before getting into the actual deployment flow. He then helps you set up a GitHub account (used as a source for the deployment), set up a local MySQL database for testing and the installation of a few required dependencies. Next is the installation of the Heroku and Travis-CI command line tools, the configuration for each and some basic setup steps for each service.

Finally, he gets back to the Symfony application, setting up a few additional options in the Composer configuration to create a few commands. These commands are then executed as a part of the deployment process. There's also changes to the Symfony configuration files to reference the environment rather than a local path in several locations. The post ends with the setup instructions on the Auth0 side to allow handling to work from the newly deployed Heroku instance.

tagged: auth0 blog symfony tutorial series part3 deploy heroku

Link: https://auth0.com/blog/symfony-tutorial-building-a-blog-part-3/

Christoph Rumpel:
Build a newsletter chatbot in PHP - Part 3
Mar 27, 2018 @ 10:57:24

Christoph Rumpel has continued his series covering the creation of a chatbot using the Botman package in a new post to his site. The latest post, part three in the series, builds on the base created in parts one and two and integrates the bot with his project website.

In part one and two we created a Facebook Messenger chatbot that let your users subscribe to your newsletter. We stored that information in the database and sent out our first newsletter. In the last third part, we integrate this bot to a website and write our first tests.

He then walks you through the process of using the Facebook Customer Chat Plugin to integrate it into the site (using the Facebook JavaScript SDK). He includes instructions on whitelisting your domain and including the plugin into the site's source using a few custom configuration options. With the integration complete he then takes a step back and shows the creation of several tests evaluating the fallback handling and subscription conversation responses.

tagged: chatbot tutorial series part3 integrate facebook testing fallback subscribe

Link: https://christoph-rumpel.com/2018/03/build-a-newsletter-chatbot-in-php-part-3