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NetTuts.com:
Integrate Bitcoin Payment Gateway Into OpenCart Part 1
December 17, 2014 @ 10:46:50

On the NetTuts.com site today they've posted the first part of a series showing the integration of the BitPay bitcoin payment service into an OpenCart instance. In this first part they focus on getting some of the initial setup and administration handling set up.

In this series, we are going to look at building a Bitcoin payment system into our installation of OpenCart. Before we get started, I recommend that you practice the basic OpenCart module development if you are not familiar with how to build your own modules. Once done, you should have enough knowledge to continue with developing more advanced modules. In this series, that's exactly what we aim to do.

They start by having you download the BitPay API library and dropping it into the root directory of your OpenCart installation. Next they show you how to create an "Admin" controller with the data you'll need to pass into the view including data pulled from a model. They also create the admin view showing the current orders using bitcoin as payment, their status and options to change the speed of the API requests, status and toggling test mode on and off. Finally they include the code to save the results of the admin form submission and a bit of validation around user permissions and API key validity.

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opencart payment integration bitpay bitcoin series part1

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/integrate-bitcoin-payment-gateway-into-opencart-part-1--cms-22328

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Installing and Securing Jenkins
December 01, 2014 @ 13:09:43

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the first part of a new series of articles showing you how to use (and secure) Jenkins, the popular continuous integration tool, to bring more quality to your PHP-based applications.

Earlier this year, I wrote an article about PHP-CI, which you can use as a continuous integration tool for your PHP projects. Within this article I indicated I still liked Jenkins the most as a CI tool. Time to dive into Jenkins and see how we can set this up for our PHP project.

In this first part of the series helps you get Jenkins installed via a package and configure it on the server. He then gets into the steps to secure the installation: configuring users, turning off signups and the type of security to set up (they choose matrix-based). He wraps up the article with a look at installing some useful plugins and using a template to use as a base for setting up your projects.

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series part1 jenkins qualityassurance qa install security tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/installing-securing-jenkins/

NetTuts.com:
Laravel, BDD and You The First Feature
November 26, 2014 @ 12:19:37

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their "Laravel, BDD and You" series (part one is here) building on their introduction in part one and building a first feature (what BDD tools call their tests).

In the second part of this series called Laravel, BDD and You, we will start describing and building our first feature using Behat and PhpSpec. In the last article we got everything set up and saw how easily we can interact with Laravel in our Behat scenarios. [...] In short, we are going to use the same .feature to design both our core domain and our user interface. I have often felt that I had a lot of duplication in my features in my acceptance/functional and integration suites. When I read everzet's suggestion about using the same feature for multiple contexts, it all clicked for me and I believe it is the way to go.

He starts in with the creation of the first feature - a simple "welcome" test that evaluates the main Laravel start page. He uses this example to set up a Laravel trait that can be reused in other parts of the testing and how to use it in a Feature Context file. He then starts to create the tests for the sample time tracking application started in part one. He gives an example of the feature file's contents, the result from its execution and the "small refactors" that it will suggest to add functionality to the feature file. With this skeleton in place, he then fleshes out the test to make it actually work with the requests. He walks through each function and provides the code needed for both the test and other tools/objects they need.

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laravel tutorial bdd feature series part2 testing behat phpspec

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/laravel-bdd-and-you-the-first-feature--cms-22486

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building an Internationalized Blog with FigDice
November 26, 2014 @ 09:55:44

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted the second part of the series looking at using the FigDice for the templates in your application. In this new post they expand on the basics presented in part one and look at internationalization.

In part one of this two-part series I started looking at FigDice, a PHP templating system that takes a slightly different approach to most. [...] In this second and final part we're going to add a simple blog to our example site, which allows us to look in more detail at Figdice's concept of data feeds. We'll also look at internationalization, translating some of the site's content into a couple of additional languages.

In this part of the series (part two of two) they create a simple blog application based on their "Feed" class from before, faking some basic content. He then creates the factory class the FigDice templating will fetch the data from and makes a view to use it. He also talks about the optional functionality to add additional data to the feed output as attributes on the element. Finally he shows how to work all of this back into the HTTP framework under a "blog/post" URL.

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internationalization figdice template library tutorial series part2

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-internationalized-blog-figdice/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with FigDice
November 21, 2014 @ 12:19:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series highlighting the FigDice template rendering system. In this latest article Lukas White focuses on FigDice's ability to "pull" data into templates as needed rather than having it injected.

Amongst the many templating systems out there, most work in pretty much the same way; variables are "injected" using some syntax or another, be it curly braces, percentage signs or whatever that library's convention happens to be. They'll usually have basic control structures, such as if...then and, of course, iteration. FigDice, however, takes an altogether different approach. Inspired by PHPTAL - the subject of a future article - it gives the view layer the responsibility of "pulling" in the data it requires, rather than relying on controllers to assemble and "push" it into the templates.

He walks you through the installation of the tool (via Composer) and how to create a basic FigDice view to work with (including template loading). He uses a sample Silex-based application for his examples, making a layout with the FigDice additions to the attributes. He then shows how to make the template for the main index page with a "mute" region for the include logic. He shows how to include this basic template into the view and render it directly as output. Next he shows how to integrate data with the template, pulling in "tweets" from an array dataset via a loop (walk) and a factory to provide the template the data.

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figdice template tutorial series part2 data integration

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-figdice/

NetTuts.com:
Building With the Twitter API Using Real-Time Streams
November 18, 2014 @ 11:28:14

NetTuts.com finishes off their series covering how to connect your application to Twitter and pull data. In this latest tutorial they show the use of the real-time streams Twitter offers to those needing the most up-to-date and immediate access to tweets via a command-line tool. This tutorial makes use of the Yii PHP framework for it's execution.

While the Twitter REST API is suitable for many applications, if you want immediate updates and access to a broader array of notifications, the Twitter Streaming API is essential. For example, only the streaming API will tell you when another user favorites one of your tweets. Using the Streaming API requires a persistent, keep-alive connection between your web server and Twitter. This type of implementation may be unfamiliar to many PHP developers. As soon as tweets come in, Twitter notifies your server in real time, allowing you to store them into your database without the delay of polling the REST API. Use of the Streaming API is also not subject to Twitter's API rate limits.

They start with a brief description of the Streams functionality and provide a graphic showing the overview of the data flow when you put them to use. They make use of the phirehose library to make the connection (making it almost a two-step method: connect & consume). They walk you through the creation of a Yii command to create the command and set it up for execution. They show you how to integrate it into a larger Yii application, create a migration to store the data and execute the resulting code as a long running command.

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realtime streams twitter tutorial series phirehose connect consume

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-with-the-twitter-api-using-real-time-streams--cms-22194

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Practical OOP Building a Quiz App - Bootstrapping
November 14, 2014 @ 13:44:09

The SitePoint PHP blog has kicked off a new series of posts today with the first tutorial about building an application with OOP and the Slim framework. In this starting article they focus in on bootstrapping the application and introducing some of the basics behind MVC and OOP.

At a certain point of my development as a PHP programmer, I was building MVC applications by-the-book, without understanding the ins-and-outs. I did what I was told: fat model, thin controller. Don't put logic in your views. What I didn't understand was how to create a cohesive application structure that allowed me to express my business ideas as maintainable code, nor did I understand how to really separate my concerns into tight layers without leaking low-level logic into higher layers. I'd heard about SOLID principles, but applying them to a web app was a mystery. In this series, we'll build a quiz application using these concepts. We'll separate the application into layers, allowing us to substitute components: for example, it'll be a breeze to switch from MongoDB to MySQL, or from a web interface to a command-line interface.

They start off with a bit about why "MVC is not enough" and how they'll be applying domain modeling as a part of the application. There's also a brief mention of the concept of a service layer and how it will fit into the overall structure. Then it's on to the code: getting Slim installed (via Composer) and starting in on the interface/service classes for the Quiz. They walk you through entity creation for the Quiz and Question instances and a mapper to tie them together.

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practical oop tutorial series part1 bootstrap slimframework solid mvc

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/practical-oop-building-quiz-app-bootstrapping/

NetTuts.com:
Programming with Yii2 Getting Started
October 31, 2014 @ 10:51:23

On the NetTuts.com site today Jeff Reifman has kicked off a new series of posts introducing you to the Yii2 framework and what it has to offer. In this first post he starts with the basics - installation, setup and configuration of a Yii2 application.

This tutorial will walk you through installing Yii 2.0, setting up your local development environment, building a simple Hello World application, setting up your remote production environment for hosting and deploying your code from a GitHub repository.

He walks you through the install process, via Composer, and creating a new project, the "Hello World". The tutorial also helps you set up a local development environment with MAMP and what the resulting page should look like when loaded. He then gets into some of the architecture of a Yii-based application and starts in on the "Hello World" controllers and views. He finishes the post with a look at setting up a remote server (not localhost) and pushing the application out, complete with commands for server setup and software configuration (like Apache).

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yii2 introduction tutorial programming series part1

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/programming-with-yii2-getting-started--cms-22440

NetTuts.com:
Refactoring Legacy Code - Part 11 The End?
October 27, 2014 @ 13:36:14

NetTuts.com has completed their series on refactoring with the posting of part eleven today: "The End?" This post finishes off a series where they've moved from the most basic level of testing out to a complex set of tests that can ensure your code's quality and functionality even after making their recommended refactoring changes.

In our previous lesson we've learned a new way to understand and make code better by extracting till we drop. While that tutorial was a good way to learn the techniques, it was hardly the ideal example to understand the benefits of it. In this lesson we will extract till we drop on all of our trivia game related code and we will analyze the final result.

They start off by "attacking the longest method" (wasCorrectlyAnswered) by starting the testing process. They make some simple checks to ensure the output is correct for various circumstances and values. With these tests in place, they safely refactor the method, splitting it up into functional pieces and completely dropping the method in favor of more targeted handling. They finish off the post with a look at some final results and comparing the refactored code with the original on things like lines of code, complexity, dependencies and structure (using this tool).

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refactor legacy code part11 series end correctly answered

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/refactoring-legacy-code-part-11-the-end--cms-22476

HHVM Blog:
Hack Recent Updates
October 22, 2014 @ 09:37:26

On the HHVM blog today they've posted some updates about the language that helps power the HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine), Hack, and the most recent changes and improvements made to the language.

One thing we haven't talked about much is the progress and evolution of the language itself. We've been busy driving the language forward, improving its PHP base as well as adding new features requested inside and outside Facebook to further increase developers' productivity. But unless you're the sort of person that reads every commit going into the HHVM github repository or every change to our docs site, you probably have no idea about any of these changes since we haven't talked much about them yet.

This post is a "kickoff" of a series of posts they'll be doing covering some of the major changes to the language including:

  • Typechecking new static()
  • First-class enums
  • Better understanding the type signatures of the PHP standard library
  • Covariance

Stay tuned to the blog for the full series.

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hack language update series improvement update

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/6443/hack-recent-updates


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