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Ben Sampson:
Speed up relationship queries in Laravel
Aug 07, 2018 @ 11:51:40

Ben Sampson has a tutorial posted to his site for the Laravel users out there sharing some tips about speeding up your database queries when using relationships between models.

Adding indexes to your database tables is a great way to get some extra performance out of your application, especially if you have a large amount of data in your tables. They should be used sparingly and only on identified slow queries, as they have implications of their own such as increased table size and increased RAM usage. But those potential drawbacks are well worth it when you can get a query down from a 3 seconds 15 milliseconds with 5 minutes of work. The effects are particularly noticeable on polymorphic / many to many polymorphic relationships.

He then includes the code required to create the indexes on your tables (either a single column or a compound index involving more than one column) in your migrations. He also provides code examples showing how to use foreign keys to improve one-to-one/one-to-many relationships. More examples include optimizations for many-to-many relationships and polymorphic relationships.

tagged: tutorial laravel index foreignkey relationship model migration optimize

Link: https://sampo.co.uk/blog/speed-up-relationship-queries-in-laravel

Michael Dyrynda:
Sharing databases between Laravel applications
Apr 13, 2018 @ 09:39:16

Michael Dyrynda has a new post to his site showing the Laravel users out there how to share a database between your applications. In his case one of the applications is a legacy app and the other is a newer Laravel application.

As a contractor, I had a sanitised copy of the database, and I managed to reverse engineer the Eloquent models from the database schema, creating factories along the way, in order to be able to write tests for the members application.

In late 2017, we started migrating our CRM to Laravel as well, in order to modernise the code base a bit, give it a standard structure, and make it easy to make changes to it moving forward. Now that we had two Laravel applications, we started looking at how best to share data between them.

He starts by talking about reverse engineering the models from the database structure and the use of migrations to manage the database schema. In the end he created a stand-alone tool, Nomad, that helps to keep things in sync between the two databases. He includes examples of it in use and how it helped to keep the database in sync despite permissions issues and connection problems. He also mentions how they used it to take care of some testing issues, database configuration changes and how to use it in a continuous integration pipeline.

tagged: share database laravel application nomad tool migration schema

Link: https://dyrynda.com.au/blog/sharing-databases-between-laravel-applications

Ivan Enderlin:
How Automattic (WordPress.com & co.) partly moved away from PHPUnit to atoum?
Mar 22, 2018 @ 12:08:37

In a post to his blog Ivan Enderlin talks about a move that his team at Automattic (the company behind WordPress) made away from using PHPUnit for their application testing over to atoum and some of the reasoning behind it.

Few months ago at tagged: wordpress testing unittest atoum phpunit comparison migration

Link: https://mnt.io/2018/02/26/how-automattic-partly-moved-away-from-phpunit-to-atoum/

PHP.net:
PHP 7.2.0 Released
Nov 30, 2017 @ 11:20:32

The PHP development group has a post on the main PHP.net site officially announcing the availability of the latest major version in the PHP 7.x series: PHP 7.2.0.

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0. This release marks the second feature update to the PHP 7 series.

There's a number of new features and changes that come with this release including counting of non-countable objects, the Object typehint, the removal of mcrypt and the new libsodium extension. You can view the full list of changes and bug fixes in the Changelog.

Downloads are available in the usual places: the main downloads page for the source packages and windows.php.net for the Windows binaries. Additionally a migration guide has been posted to help with migrating to this new version.

tagged: php72 release language version update migration

Link: http://php.net/archive/2017.php#id2017-11-30-1

Symfony Finland:
Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex
Jun 26, 2017 @ 11:42:12

On the Symfony Finland site they've posted a retrospective about moving an application from Symfony 3 to Flex including the work that was done in the switch and the performance of the result.

Earlier this year I did some experimenting with a Hybrid state object between Symfony Twig templates and front end JavaScript frameworks. Since that time I did that experiment, the Symfony Flex project has progressed. I thought I would try how to port the state prototype to Symfony Flex.

[...] In my case the application was rather simple and all built in the AppBundle, which is best-practise in Symfony3 for many applications. I mostly had to move files and configurations around and change namespaces.

He starts by spending some time talking about the difference between a Symfony 3 environment and the environment Flex provides. He then goes through the eight or so steps to move from one to the other including file/directory changes and configuration updates. Next comes the look at performance differences between the two. Unsurprisingly Flex came out on top in every measurement he threw at it.

In addition to the new structure, the apparent improvement in performance is obviously welcome. This would likely be even more evident where I could leave more dependencies out, for example in API workloads. This obviously won't magically push Symfony/PHP into Golang or Node.js territory for raw API throughput, but for existing large code bases it could provide a low-effort boost.
tagged: symfony symfony3 symfonyflex migration performance benchmark process tutorial

Link: https://symfony.fi/entry/porting-a-symfony-3-application-to-flex

The Bakery:
Welcoming Phinx to the CakePHP family!
Jun 23, 2017 @ 09:54:02

On The Bakery (the CakePHP site) an official announcement has been posted welcoming Phinx to the CakePHP family. The Phinx library is a popular tool for framework-agnostic database migration handling.

We are very excited to announce that Phinx has joined the CakePHP team. The Github project has already been moved to the CakePHP organisation. The project itself will stay MIT-licensed but be gradually transformed into a Cake Software Foundation project. Other great news is that the current way to install and update Phinx remains unchanged.

As you are aware, CakePHP has been using Phinx since 3.0.0 for database migrations. The CakePHP Core team welcomes the opportunity to look after and maintain the project and will now start making changes to bring the code in line with the CakePHP (our) coding standards. As well as cleaning up issues and PR’s soon. We will be following up with our plans for the code and setting roadmaps in the coming weeks.

Rob Morgan, the original author of the library has also added some of his own commentary in a post to his site:

I’ve been busy lately. Juggling startups and open source work is no easy feat. I managed to do it for the past 5 years, but beyond 30 its proving to be more difficult. Phinx is not accelerating at the pace I’d like it to be. In fact so far this year we’ve only managed to ship 6 releases. I decided that the best strategy moving forwards is to find a new home for Phinx. One that has an active and loyal community and one that delivers great software. I’m pleased to announce that I’ve found the right fit.

He points out that the only real thing changing for now is the location of the repository. He looks back on the journey that got him and the project to where it is today and how much the support from the PHP community meant during that time.

tagged: cakephp phinx database migration robmorgan library project foundation

Link: https://bakery.cakephp.org/2017/06/23/welcoming-phinx-to-the-cakephp-family.html

Laravel News:
Introduction to Seeding Data in Testing
Apr 10, 2017 @ 10:42:26

On the Laravel News site they've posted an introduction to seeding data in testing to help make your Laravel application testing easier and see "more correct" results.

Since seeding was released in Laravel 5.1, testing has become easier and quicker.

You can have ten users with each having a post or 1000 users with one or more posts inserted before the testing begins. In this tutorial, you will create a test case to test the user model and a seeder to seed ten users, and each is following one user into the database.

The tutorial starts with a migration to create a "users" table including a "follow user ID" field that tracks which user another is following. Next up is the creation of the User model with the methods to create the "follow" links between users. The make:seeder command is then used with this model to generate the seeder class and make 10 users with faked information. The db:seed command is used to execute the seeder and populate the data. Finally an example test case is created, first just testing that 10 users were created then refactored to test links between the users and the follow/unfollow functionality.

tagged: laravel seed data testing migration tutorial unittest model

Link: https://laravel-news.com/seeding-data-testing

Zend Framework Blog:
Using Configuration-Driven Routes in Expressive
Apr 05, 2017 @ 12:21:26

The Zend Framework blog continues their series of posts looking at the Zend Expressive framework with this latest tutorial showing you how to use configuration-driven routing instead of routes defined in just code.

Expressive 1 used configuration-driven pipelines and routing; Expressive 2 switches to use programmatic pipelines and routes instead. The programmatic approach was chosen as many developers have indicated they find it easier to understand and easier to read, and ensures they do not have any configuration conflicts.

However, there are times you may want to use configuration. For example, when you are writing re-usable modules, it's often easier to provide configuration for routed middleware, than to expect users to cut-and-paste examples, or use features such as delegator factories.

Fortunately, starting in Expressive 2, we offer a couple different mechanisms to support configuration-driven pipelines and routing.

They start by pointing out the result of the Expressive v1 to v2 migration tool (enabling v2's pipeline handling) and a warning that there could be issues as the programmatic declarations still remain. The tutorial then gets into some of the drawbacks of going configuration-only but shows how, with just a bit of extra code, those can be someone relieved. An example is included showing a configuration provider that, from the functionality itself, defines the routes and injects them into the current application (using injectRoutesFromConfig).

tagged: zendframework zendexpressive configuration route pipeline migration provider tutorial

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-03-30-expressive-config-routes.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Migrating to Expressive 2.0
Mar 14, 2017 @ 12:36:17

The Zend Framework blog has a tutorial they've posted showing you how to migrate up to Zend Expressive v2.0 from a v1.x application and some of the things that could break along the way.

Last week, we released Expressive 2. A new major version implies breaking changes, which often poses a problem when migrating. That said, we did a lot of work behind the scenes to try and ensure that migrations can happen without too much effort, including providing migration tools to ease the transition.

In this tutorial, we will detail migrating an existing Expressive application from version 1 to version 2.

Using this repository for a testbed, they walk through the steps for the update:

  • Creating a migration branch
  • Updating dependencies
  • using the zendframework/zend-expressive-tooling to aid in the migration
  • scanning your code to find possible breaking locations
  • moving over to the programmatic pipeline structure

They also include some bonus information covering self-invoking functions, the zend-config-aggregator and development mode. The post ends with the updates you'll need to make to middleware to implement the http-interop/http-middleware MiddlewareInterface.

tagged: zendframework zendexpressive v2 migration guide tool

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-03-13-expressive-2-migration.html

ThePHP.cc:
Refactoring to PHP 7
Jan 31, 2017 @ 10:52:42

On thePHP.cc blog today there's a new post sharing some helpful hints related to refactoring your application to PHP 7 written up by a friend of the group, Tim Bezhashvyly.

Recently I have migrated a relatively large codebase from PHP 5.6 to PHP 7 and would like to share some of my learnings. To get the most out of this article, you should be familiar with scalar type declarations (and return type declarations). To learn about these and other features of PHP 7, I recommend the "PHP 7 Explained" eBook.

He makes the recommendation of a bold first step: enabling the strict typing on every file in your application to enforce the typing of all values. Next he recommends running your current test suite to see where the failures are. Changes are pretty high that you'll find issues with type switching and magic method handling. He suggests a method for migrating your code effectively to PHP 7: a test-driven migration. This focus works fine if your coverage is good but unless you're exercising all parts of your codebase things will unfortunately be missed.

He also points out some other changes you can make with this update including the removal of some PHPDoc annotations (you'll know the type for sure now) and modifications that may need to be made to current mock objects in your tests. There's a few other smaller things he recommends looking out for as well including the use of the "silencer" operator and exception changes.

tagged: refactoring php7 testdriven unittest testing migration strict types

Link: https://thephp.cc/news/2017/01/refactoring-to-php7