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Michael Kimsal:
Is your code portable to subfolders?
September 02, 2014 @ 09:12:53

In a quick new post to his site Michael Kimsal asks an interesting question that some PHP developers don't think about in the course of their development: "Is your code portable to subfolders?.

Have been dealing with a couple of PHP projects recently which have been a far bigger pain in the backside than I anticipated, and both had some of the same stumbling blocks. In both cases, and in other projects I've seen, there's a huge assumption that the code will be run from the root of a domain, and all url and routing management have this assumption baked in to everything they touch. What's the answer?

Some projects just suggest making a new virtual host in the web server configuration and moving on, but this isn't always a real possibility for some projects. In some recent experience, he's found several of the major PHP frameworks assume this kind of setup. He mentions a Java framework, Spring, that allows for this kind of redirect and wonders why it's not that easy in something like Slim.

Maybe try grabbing your own code sometime and reinstalling it in a 'non-traditional' way, and see how many assumptions you've baked in are really necessary, vs just using defaults.
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subfolder project portable framework

Link: http://michaelkimsal.com/blog/is-your-code-portable-to-subfolders/

Anthony Ferrara:
Introducing Recki-CT
September 01, 2014 @ 10:56:46

Anthony Ferrara has introduced an interesting new tool in his most recent post, a compiler toolkit for PHP: Recki-CT.

Over 1.5 years ago, I introduced PHPPHP to the world. It was the first implementation of the PHP language written in PHP itself. But PHPPHP suffered from a few problems which relegated it to toy status (such as performance). Today, I get to introduce you to another implementation of PHP, written in PHP. But this one is no toy. This one... This one is fun...

He goes on to introduce the tool, pointing out what it is (and isn't) and how it compiles the PHP down into machine code. He covers the difference between it and things like HHVM and some benchmarks on how fast the resulting code performs. He also gives some thanks to people who helped him along the way (as well as sone of the projects it relies on). If you're interested in finding out more, check out the project's GitHub page for complete info and the latest version.

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reckict project compile language phpphp

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/08/introducing-recki-ct.html

Engine Yard Blog:
Engine Yard Is Sponsoring Composer
August 27, 2014 @ 11:50:24

According to this new post to the EngineYard blog, they're announcing their formal sponsorship of a tool that has revolutionized the way PHP libraries and packages are used: Composer.

Open source is a big deal at Engine Yard. Originally founded as a Ruby company, most of our early work was in the Ruby community. Since acquiring Orchestra in 2011, we have been investing in the PHP commmunity and are continually on the look out for ways to give back. So I'm thrilled to be sharing the latest news on this front. [...] We care a lot about PHP and we want to continue our mission of supporting key pieces of infrastructure in the communities we serve.

Their support is coming in the form of a community grant provided over the next twelve months. This fund ($15k) will provide support for the continued development of the project and Nils Adermann, one of Composer's principal developers.

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engineyard sponsor composer communitygrant project

Link: https://blog.engineyard.com/2014/engine-yard-sponsoring-composer

Alex Bilbie:
Open Source Guilt
August 18, 2014 @ 13:29:43

Alex Bilbie has an interesting new post to his site looking at the idea of open source guilt. He uses the term to describe the feeling you can get when a project falls by the wayside and you're not putting as much effort into it as you had before. He uses his own real-world project work as an example (an Oauth2 server and client).

I've willingly and happily poured hours of my life into both projects. [...] After leaving the university I moved to London and my life "got flipped-turned upside down" (as Will Smith once put it) which naturally resulted in a reduction in the number of commits that went into the projects. [...] I did my best with the emails piling up in my inbox but I also ignored many. [...] Releasing open source projects is a great feeling however there are a number of considerations one should bear in mind.

He makes the suggestion of four things to keep in mind when working on and releasing an open source project. These are things that can remind you (and keep you away from) some of the issues he's had in his own work:

  • Actions have consequences
  • People want to help
  • Your personal reputation is on the line
  • Popular open source projects work well when the authors are using the project regularly themselves

He also includes a few personal things he's going to do to try to make life easier and happier including roadmaps for projects, documenting via FAQs and being more honest about his own availability.

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opensource guilt project maintenance personal

Link: http://alexbilbie.com/2014/08/open-source-guilt/

Reddit.com:
PHP library authors Have you considered to arrange security bug bounties?
August 06, 2014 @ 10:39:00

In this new post to Reddit.com Timoh suggests something that could definitely help improve the overall security of the PHP ecosystem - a bug bounty system, providing libraries and projects an easy way to security-related submissions for their code.

To encourage software security research on the open-source PHP libraries we use everyday, I have been brainstorming the possibilities for us, the code authors, to start to offer security bug bounties on the projects we maintain. It is a shame such a few PHP projects encourages security research by offering bug bounties, and I think it doesn't have to be this way.

He describes his ideas for the system including the ability to offer both monetary bounties and other kinds of recognition as well. Comments on the post are largely supportive, agreeing with him that it can definitely help things. He also makes the suggestion of getting frameworks with corporate backings (like Zend Framework and Symfony) to be some of the leaders and be an example to other projects and get them on board. What do you think? Add your own thoughts and suggestions about the project to the mix!

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bugbounty service project library zendframework symfony bounty recognition

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2cpu6v/php_library_authors_have_you_considered_to/

Three Devs & A Maybe Podcast:
Delving into CakePHP with James Watts
July 16, 2014 @ 09:13:33

The Three Devs & A Maybe podcast has posted episode #34 of their podcast today featuring a chat with James Watts, a member of the core CakePHP development team. They talk about the framework, his own background and how he got into the project.

This week we are very lucky to have James Watts, a core member of the CakePHP project on the show. Initially starting off with his journey into programming, we move on to talk about the differences we find between junior and senior developers. We then touch upon his previous start-up experience and how that resulted in him thinking more about the product as a whole. CakePHP has been around for almost 10 years now, we discuss how he got into the project - along with the frameworks key goals. We then move on to highlight some of the key differences/features you will find in the next major release (3.0). Finally, we discuss his upcoming book, and his experiences with organising a large open-source community event.

Topics mentioned include CakeFest, the CakeDC presentation about git workflow and a few video interviews posted over on the CakePHP Youtube channel. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 directly.

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threedevsandamaybe podcast ep34 jameswatts cakephp project interview

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/posts/delving-into-cakephp-with-james-watts/

Adam Culp:
Fun with Travis CI and PHP projects
July 14, 2014 @ 10:43:53

Adam Culp has a new post to his site sharing some of his fun with Travis CI and his PHP-based applications. He recently started using it and provides a step-by-step guide of how he got started with some handy tips along the way. Travis CI is a continuous integration platform providing processes that run automated testing or other build processes when new commits are made to a repository.

I know I should have done this a long time ago, but I finally got my hands dirty with Travis CI. I wanted to set up a php project on github to use Travis CI to monitor the status, in case I forgot to run the tests prior to pushing. Unfortunately it was not as easy as it's made out to be. But now that I've done it once, it'll be easier next time. So, here is how I tackled it.

He walks you through five (or really six) different steps to getting a build process set up for your repository (complete with screenshots):

  • Create a Travis CI account and link it to your GitHub account
  • Add the repository to connect the build to
  • Make a ".travis.yml" file to configure the build (his runs PHPUnit tests)
  • Validate that PHPUnit runs locally
  • Verify the webhook for Travis CI has been set up correctly

Finally, he includes a bit of description about a successful build and how to add the "badge" showing the current build status to the README of your repository (using Markdown syntax).

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travisci introduction project adamculp guide

Link: http://www.geekyboy.com/archives/908

PHP Town Hall:
Episode 28 Loosley Coupled Mashup
July 11, 2014 @ 09:39:19

The PHP Town Hall podcast has posted their latest episode, the mashup with the Loosely Coupled podcast they did (it's here on their side) talking about their favorite open source projects.

In this episode, Ben and Phil join forces with Loosely Coupled to talk about Open Source, burn out and briefly discuss their favorite open source projects. Jeff was out of action for a lot of it due to unexpected wifi troubles (in San Francisco of all places) so he sadly did not get to take part as much as he would have liked.

There were also a few questions taken from the listening audience about dealing with overly reliant people, explaining OSS to non-tech people and the OSS "clauses" some employer put into their contracts. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or you can watch the live video recording posted on YouTube.

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phptownhall ep28 looselycoupled mashup opensource project

Link: http://phptownhall.com/blog/2014/07/10/episode-28-loosley-coupled-mashup/

PHP.net:
PHP Next Generation
May 28, 2014 @ 09:14:05

On the main PHP.net site today there's an announcement posted about the working being done on the next generation of the PHP language based on some recent discussions (and actual development work). The PHPNG branch helps boost the performance of the language to new levels and cleans up some of the core APIs.

When we aren't looking for pictures of kittens on the internet, internals developers are nearly always looking for ways to improve PHP, a few developers have a focus on performance. Over the last year, some research into the possibility of introducing JIT compilation capabilities to PHP has been conducted. During this research, the realization was made that in order to achieve optimal performance from PHP, some internal API's should be changed. This necessitated the birth of the phpng branch, initially authored by Dmitry Stogov, Xinchen Hui, and Nikita Popov.

The post talks about the performance increase of these changes (an average of 20%) and the current progress made on the internal project. This is "only the start" of the work on this new functionality, so keep an eye on the PHP.net site for more upcoming details.

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phpng next generation branch project performance

Link: http://www.php.net/archive/2014.php#id2014-05-27-1

HHVM Blog:
Hack Community Roundup
May 19, 2014 @ 12:45:12

For those interested in what's going on in the world of Hack (the Facebook-created language based on PHP) check out this "community roundup" with information about and links to some of the latest happenings.

In the weeks since the Hack open source launch and the Hack developer day, there has been a lot of information, code, blog posts, etc coming from our nascent community. To us on the team, it's been incredible and encouraging to see the community reception to Hack. Here are some of the highlights of the things we've seen come out of our community. (And we almost certainly haven't seen everything, so please let us know in the comments what we've missed!

They share several related GitHub projects (including the Hack/HHVM support on Heroku), a few presentations about installation and experience with the tools and a few blog posts wrapping up their Hack dev day and an article from FastCompany about Hack and its motivation

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hhvm hack roundup github project blog presentations

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/4811/hack-community-roundup


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