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Laravel News:
Creating Your Own PHP Helpers in a Laravel Project
Dec 11, 2017 @ 11:16:36

The Laravel News site has a quick post sharing a helpful topic for the Laravel users out there. In the tutorial they show how to create custom helpers for use across the entire application in any scope.

Laravel provides many excellent helper functions that are convenient for doing things like working with arrays, file paths, strings, and routes, among other things like the beloved dd() function.

You can also define your own set of helper functions for your Laravel applications and PHP packages, by using Composer to import them automatically.

If you are new to Laravel or PHP, let’s walk through how you might go about creating your own helper functions that automatically get loaded by Laravel.

The tutorial starts off by recommending the placement of the custom helper file and how to ensure it's autoloaded when the application is bootstrapped. It then covers the creation of the helper functions including the use of if checks to ensure there's not a function naming collision. Finally the post includes an example of a helper file, sharing the creation of two methods: show_route and plural_from_model. The post ends with a look at packages and how to include helper files inside of them for use in your application.

tagged: helper laravel tutorial introduction project file autoload

Link: https://laravel-news.com/creating-helpers

Laravel News:
TLDR Pages: Simplified and Community-Driven Man pages
Dec 05, 2017 @ 09:28:13

On the Laravel News site today they've posted about an effort that's been started to help create simple and community-driven man pages (documentation, manual pages) for command-line tools.

The TLDR pages (too long; didn’t read) is a command-line project that aims to simplify man pages with useful, terse examples of commands. This CLI tool gives me even less reason to memorize the tar and curl flags.

The way the TLDR command works after you’ve installed it is by passing it a command for which you’d like to learn practical uses without combing the full manual.

The article shows how to install this tldr package via npm and make it global on your system to be able to use it anywhere. There are also options for other languages if Node.js isn't your thing. You can find out more about the tool and what features it offers over on the project homepage. They also link to the repository if you'd like to contribute back to the documentation.

tagged: tldr toolongdidntread manual page documentation community project install

Link: https://laravel-news.com/tldr-pages

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: An Update on Flex
Nov 21, 2017 @ 10:01:46

In a new post to his site Fabien Potencier has posted an update about Symfony 4/Flex and what can be expected from this upcoming release.

Symfony 4 is just around the corner. And Symfony Flex is one of the main selling point for the upgrade. Developers love the new philosophy. And a lot of changes happened since my last blog post. Let me recap the recent changes that you might not be aware of. Most of these changes were prompted by feedback from early adopters.

Included in his list are things like the easier use of recepie contributions, Makefile support changes and minimum PHP version requirements. He also links to an upgrade tutorial and a best practices guide to help you get your application and its code prepared for this new release.

tagged: symfony symfony4 flex update project changes

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-flex-update.html

Symfony Finland:
Symfony Flex adoption picks up prior to release of 4.0 in November 2017
Oct 31, 2017 @ 09:55:14

The Symfony Finland site has a new post with a brief look at how the adoption rate of Symfony Flex has picked up with the impending release of Symfony 4 coming next month (November 2017).

With Symfony 4.0 a new standard structure for building applications is being adopted. This is known as Symfony Flex and will be the preferred way of creating applications. Symfony 4.0 is scheduled for release in November 2017, but many projects have already started adopting the new structure.

[...] In six years a lot of things have changed in the web development world, with the rise of front end driven applications, containerised microservices and more. [...] One thing that has not changed for some time is the Standard Edition itself. It has been critiqued for being enterprisey and heavy on configuration. [...] The trend was noticed by the team and in December 2016 at the SymfonyCon Berlin Symfony Flex was announced.

The post also lists out some of the projects that are already embracing Symfony Flex in their project structure including the GraphQL bundle and the PhpStorm Symfony plugin. Symfony Flex also gives developers a way to more immediately work with Symfony 4 when it is released through the same methods as now (with the 3.3 components).

tagged: symfony symfonyflex symfony4 adoption rate project november

Link: https://symfony.fi/entry/symfony-flex-adoption-picks-up

Armin Weihbold:
Diving into API Platform - Part 2
Oct 02, 2017 @ 11:50:15

Armin Weihbold has continued his series looking at building APIs in PHP applications in part two covering the use of the API Platform project as a base. You can find part one here if you need to get caught up.

He picks up right where the last article ends and continues setting up the Docker environment for the application. Once he figured out a small snag in the setup he was able to get the basic documentation (the list of endpoints) up and running.

Next he creates a "material design" administration interface using React showing how he pulled in the requirements he needed to get the interface up and running. Code is included for the interface and a screenshot is included so you can see the end result.

tagged: api platform apiplatform project tutorial series part2 frontend docker

Link: https://medium.com/@koyaan5/diving-into-api-platform-part-2-1ce890c0b85f

Symfony Blog:
Symfony 3.4 and 4.0 are about to enter into their "feature freeze" period
Sep 28, 2017 @ 11:28:42

On the Symfony blog there's a new post talking about the upcoming feature freeze for Symfony 3.4 and 4.0.

Symfony project follows a time-based development process where two new minor versions are released each year and a major version is released every two years.

This year, Symfony 3.4 and Symfony 4.0 will be both released at the end of November 2017. The only difference between both versions is that 3.4 includes all features deprecated in 3.x branches and 4.0 removes them.

Two months before their final releases, Symfony versions enter into a "feature freeze" period. During this time, we can't add new features and we solely focus on polishing and stabilizing the new features (and even reverting them if they don't work properly).

In other words, this week is our last chance to add new features to Symfony 3.4 and 4.0.

The post lists out a few ways that you can help out including reviewing pull requests and issues to see if there's anything that might be missing from these releases and might need to be integrated pre-freeze.

tagged: symfony framework featurefreeze v34 v40 project

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/symfony-3-4-and-4-0-are-about-to-enter-into-their-feature-freeze-period

HHVM Blog:
The Future of HHVM
Sep 19, 2017 @ 09:45:03

The HHVM project (an alternative PHP runtime from Facebook) has made a major announcement on their blog - beginning with version 3.24 they'll no longer be trying to keep parity with the PHP language now that it has moved into PHP 7.

The HHVM team is happy about the direction PHP has taken with PHP7, and we’re proud of the role we’ve played in pushing the language and runtime to where they are today. Since the PHP community is finally saying goodbye to PHP5, we’ve decided to do so as well.

Our next LTS release, 3.24, will be cut about four months from now and will receive support for one year thereafter. It will also be the last HHVM release that commits to PHP5 support. This aligns with PHP’s own timeline of sunsetting PHP5 at the end of 2018.

[...] PHP7 is charting a new course away from PHP5, and we want to do the same, via a renewed focus on Hack. Consequently, HHVM will not aim to target PHP7. The HHVM team believes that we have a clear path toward making Hack a fantastic language for web development, untethered from its PHP origins. We’d do ourselves and our users a disservice by positioning HHVM as an uncommon, less well-documented, less compatible PHP7 runtime.

The post then lists out some of their goals for the HHVM/Hack projects moving forward including reinvesting in open source and staying focused on their needs for the platform and language. It then talks about some of the upcoming changes you can expect around support of current versions of popular PHP tools and work on tools created specifically for Hack.

tagged: hhvm facebook platform hack language project goals php5 php7

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/2017/09/18/the-future-of-hhvm.html

Alex Bilbie:
Looking for a new maintainer of league/oauth2-server
Aug 23, 2017 @ 09:30:16

In a new post to his site Alex Bilbie has started the search for a new maintainer for the league/oauth2-server package citing the lack of time on his part to give the project the time it needs to flourish.

A little over five years ago I pushed the league/oauth2-server. The project has been downloaded over 2.5 million times, has more than 3000 Github stars and has been contributed to by 77 awesome people across some 2000 commits.

Last year when I became self-employed I had intentions that I’d have more time to dedicate towards open source projects but reality worked out slightly differently and I’ve had one of the busiest (and best) years of my life.

He also points out that, besides the lack of time to work on the project, he also doesn't actively use the project himself and wants to find a maintainer that "is/are really impassioned by the project, want to advance the project (for example implement OpenID support) and are willing to devote time to answering support requests and review pull requests."

If this interests you and you'd like to see the project move forward, the post includes his contact information for you to reach out.

tagged: oauth2server phpleague package maintainer request community project

Link: https://alexbilbie.com/2017/08/looking-for-a-new-maintainer-of-league-oauth2-server/

Twilio Blog:
Creating a Symfony 3 Project with Basic User Handling
Aug 18, 2017 @ 09:56:26

On the Twilio blog they've posted a new tutorial from author Margaret Staples showing you how to create a Symfony 3 project with user handling along with the Friends of Symfony bundle.

User handling is a fundamental part of a ton of web projects. This post will walk through how to get setup using the Symfony 3 framework and the Friends of Symfony bundle so that your project can allow users to register, login and out, and view and edit their User profile. The steps here will serve as a great starting point for your next web project.

She then walks you through the installation of the Symfony standard edition and how to answer some of the interactive setup questions. Once that's set up she shows how to install the FriendsOfSymfony/FOSUserBundle and what configuration options need to be changed to implement it. She then shows how to update the database schema for the new user handling and how to check to be sure the login, registration and profile pages are working as expected.

tagged: symfony3 project user handling tutorial install configure migrate

Link: https://www.twilio.com/blog/2017/08/up-and-running-with-symfony-3.html

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Silex is dead (… or not)
Jul 10, 2017 @ 11:24:58

In a new post to his site Gonzalo Ayuso talks about the Silex project (a Symfony-based microframework) and how it just might be dead.

The last week was deSymfony conference in Castellón (Spain). IMHO deSymfony is the best conference I’ve ever attended. [...] This year I cannot join to the conference. It was a pity. A lot of good friends there. So I only can follow the buzz in Twitter, read the published slides (thanks Raul) and wait for the talk videos in youtube.

In my Twitter timeline especially two tweets get my attention. One tweet was from Julieta Cuadrado and another one from Asier Marqués. [...] Tweets are in Spanish but the translation is clear: Javier Eguiluz (Symfony Core Team member and co-organizer of the conference) said in his talk: “Silex is dead”.

He goes on to talk about how, despite the overly dramatic title, the Silex project isn't really "dead" but does have an uncertain future. He talks some about the next version of Symfony - Symfony 4 - and how, because if the changes since v3, it could essentially replace most of what Silex offers. Unfortunately, this also leads to another problem - Symfony 4 isn't ready and if Silex will be deprecated which should he choose for new projects? After some investigation, he decided that Lumen, a Laravel-based microframework, was just right for his needs.

tagged: silex microframework symfony framework project dead symfony4

Link: https://gonzalo123.com/2017/07/10/silex-is-dead-or-not/