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Quora.com:
What are some things you wish you knew when you started programming?
Mar 21, 2017 @ 10:24:44

Leonid Mamchenkov has linked over to a great thread over on Quora that asks the question "[What are some things you wish you knew when you started programming?

](https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-things-you-wish-you-knew-when-you-started-programming)?"

The post is originally from Ken Mazaika, CTO, Co-founder & Mentor @ thefirehoseproject.com but it has expanded way beyond his original list of 27 things. There's comments sharing everything from personal experiences out to their own lists of things they wish they knew. Topics mentioned include:

  • the "cognitive burden"
  • the importance of getting away from the screen sometimes
  • the value in listening, not just hearing, your colleagues
  • thinking about security at all times
  • learning the "why" of coding, not just the "how"

There's a lot more in this post so get over and start reading. There tips in here for everyone, both those new to programming and those that have been doing it for years.

tagged: wish you knew programming opinion experience quora

Link: https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-things-you-wish-you-knew-when-you-started-programming

SitePoint PHP Blog:
The State of PHP MVC Frameworks in 2017
Mar 03, 2017 @ 09:49:40

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post sharing the current state of PHP MVC frameworks in 2017. The article doesn't focus on any particular list of frameworks (though the more popular ones are used in the examples) and instead focus on the overall trends they've seen in frameworks and their use.

A simple question prompted me to sit down and write this follow up to my article from about a year ago: "Any thoughts about where things are today?"

He suggests that, while several of the major frameworks are still in active development and are seeing new features in recent versions, the front-runners are probably Laravel and Symfony. He includes trend numbers to back this up (popularity, basically) but also briefly touches on others: CakePHP, CodeIgniter and Zend Framework 2. He then breaks it down into two groups: Symfony/Laravel and "the rest". The post wraps up with a look at the rise of microservices, the "destruction of the monolith" and a more recent emphasis on scalability over just features.

tagged: state mvc framework 2017 opinion laravel symfony trend popularity

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/the-state-of-php-mvc-frameworks-in-2017/

David Lundgren:
The allure of static proxies
Mar 02, 2017 @ 10:52:47

David Lundgren has a post to his site talking about the allure of static proxies in your development and some of his own experiences using them in his own code (and in using Laravel).

Several weeks ago I started playing with Laravel. Primarily because several colleagues are using it, and have suggested that I take a look at it. During my time reviewing how to build a view template I came across references to Html, Form, View and other static calls. Initially I was not impressed due to the use of so many static calls. I have come to an understanding about how static calls in certain circumstances can actually enhance code readability.

He talks about how static calls have been considered an anti-pattern for a long time due to difficulty testing and tight coupling issues. That being said, he did start to see the value in using them in certain situations, how his use relates to the proxy design pattern and some of his own conclusions about using static calls.

tagged: allure static proxy opinion laravel facade cleancode

Link: http://davidscode.com/blog/2017/02/27/the-allure-of-static-proxies/

Michelle Sanver:
We can all learn from the Drupal community
Mar 02, 2017 @ 09:17:51

Michelle Sanver has written up a qucik post on the Liip blog sharing a few things she thinks we can all learn from the Drupal community.

I started hearing about Drupal 8 back in 2014, how this CMS would start using Symfony components, an idea I as a PHP and Symfony developer found very cool.

That is when I got involved with Drupal, not the CMS, but the community.

I got invited to my first DrupalCon back in 2015. That was the biggest conference I have ever been to, thousands of people were there. When I entered the conference building I saw several things, one of them was that the code of conduct was very visible and printed. I also got a t-shirt that fit me really well – A rarity at most tech conferences I go to. The gender and racial diversity also seemed fairly high, I immediately felt comfortable and like I belonged – Super cool first impression.

She goes on to talk about more of her experiences at the conference, both in how it was run and about her fellow attendees. She ultimately shares the main message of the post:

[...] Embrace our differences, and each other, and accept that we do different things and we are different people and it doesn’t matter because that is what makes community work, that is what makes us awesome. Diversity matters, Drupal got this.
tagged: drupal community opinion learn experience conference

Link: https://blog.liip.ch/archive/2017/03/01/can-learn-drupal-community.html

Jason McCreary:
Lumen is dead. Long live Lumen.
Feb 28, 2017 @ 15:17:59

In a new post to his site Jason McCreary offers some of his opinions around why he thinks Lumen is dying. Lumen is a micro-framework from the creators of Laravel offered as an alternative to the full-on Laravel framework.

You’ve already read the title, so I’ll just say it, I think Lumen is dying, if not already dead. Now let me tell you why…

Jason (creator of Laravel Shift) shares some of his own statistics around Laravel versus Lumen "shifts" and some graphs that help to support the theory. He suggests that part of the issue is that there's less focus on a wider, more general use of the tool and how he suspects that the Lumen feature set will continue to lessen. He ends on a more positive note, though, suggesting that Lumen as it stands may not exist in the future but may live on integrated into the Laravel framework.

tagged: lumen project laravel dead opinion

Link: https://jason.pureconcepts.net/2017/02/lumen-is-dead-long-live-lumen/

Laravel News:
Habits of Highly Productive Tech Teams
Jan 27, 2017 @ 10:18:22

On the Laravel News site there's an article posted from Sharon Steed covering some habits of highly productive tech teams including topics like trust, meetings and understanding roles.

There’s always a lot of talk about “culture” on tech teams. And that makes sense: managers generally hire people that will fit in well with the group they’ve assembled because they know there’s more to work than just doing the job. Being able to get along with your coworkers, being reliable, and looking the part are also important. A big part of building a solid company culture is about creating an environment which helps your employees be productive. Unfortunately, a lot of what we do in tech has the opposite effect.

She talks about the role of perks in an effective workforce and how, despite some seeming very nice on the outside, can cause burnout as it encourages longer work hours than normal. From there she moves into some suggestions about "meeting culture" and some of the major drawbacks to meetings (including how they can distract from "real, paying work"). There's a nice flow chart included in the post too that can help you determine if a meeting is really necessary or not. From there she goes on to talk about the other two topics mentioned above - employees knowing and understanding their roles and fostering trust between them through things like delegation and effective listening.

tagged: highly productive teams technology opinion trust meetings roles

Link: https://laravel-news.com/habits-of-highly-productive-tech-teams

Adam Wathan:
Methods Are Affordances, Not Abilities
Jan 25, 2017 @ 09:58:45

Adam Wathan has a new post on his site about a different way of thinking he's coming around to about methods, affordances and abilities.

In one of my current projects, I needed to be able to broadcast email announcements to all of the users in the system. If you've read about enough patterns and principles, there's a decent chance you saw [the line allowing an Announcement to perform the "broadcast" operation] and immediately thought to yourself: "What?! An announcement shouldn't be able to broadcast itself!"

I used to think that too, but over the last few years I've started to think differently.

He talks about "do-er" classes that normally would take in something like an announcement and perform the operation to broadcast it. He suggests that this comes from a misunderstanding about the point of methods: abilities versus things you could do with an object. He goes on to give some examples of double standards with DateTime handling, the complexity it could introduce and how, despite it sounding like an immediate action, the "broadcast" method could just be deferring to a background queue anyway.

tagged: methods affordance ability difference misunderstanding thinking opinion

Link: https://adamwathan.me/2017/01/24/methods-are-affordances-not-abilities/

Stefan Koopmanschap:
Best practices on bundles in Symfony
Dec 29, 2016 @ 10:53:39

Stefan Koopmanschap has a new post to his site sharing some best practices with bundles in Symfony including structure of both the bundle and the application it lives in.

On one of my recent commutes I started listening to the Sound of Symfony podcast. As I had just discovered that one, I decided to listen to their most recent episode, which is on best practices for bundles. I quite disagreed with what was being said in the podcast. I started voicing my disagreement on Twitter but quickly decided that 140 characters is not enough to really explain my disagreement. So here's a blogpost.

He starts by talking about some of the current "best practices" documentation (like this book) and the parts of it he disagrees with. He talks about the use of the AppBundle, the general structure of a Symfony project and the use of bundles to provide better structure to your own code. He covers the placement of you code (your "domain") and the integration of the idea of bounded contexts. He finishes the post with some of his own experience with various frameworks and both good and bad project structures - and how sometimes the default framework structure isn't really what's needed.

tagged: symfony bestpractice bundles structure application opinion soundofsymfony

Link: http://leftontheweb.com/blog/2016/12/29/best-practices-on-bundles-symfony/

Laravel News:
Just-In-Time Knowledge: How to learn what you need to know and forget the rest
Dec 23, 2016 @ 10:27:17

On the Laravel News site there's an interesting post about learning "just in time" so you can not only keep up with the latest knowledge but not have to worry about things you don't actually need to know.

Technology—including the web—moves insanely fast. It can be intimidating (often annoyingly so) to try to not only consume the content constantly served to us, but also retain it. After all, isn’t the point of sharing information to learn from it? This just-in-time knowledge can be an unfriendly reminder that, no matter how hard we try, we will have a difficult time keeping up with the newest trends and tech.

[...] Luckily in tech, most of us have to keep up to date on software and hardware to be successful at work. But what if we’re swimming in a project at work and don’t have time to look into the new technologies? What if it’s nearly impossible to bake new knowledge into our jobs?

The article talks about methods for "knowledge gathering" you can do in small bites during your day, making use of them to keep up with the latest trends and technology. It also talks about retention, how sleep and training play into it and the where researching topics more in-depth can help.

tagged: justintime knowledge learning research retention opinion

Link: https://laravel-news.com/just-in-time-knowledge

Amine Matmati:
Symfony: the Myth of the Bloated Framework
Dec 20, 2016 @ 12:25:50

Amine Matmati has written up a post with a few quick points refuting the "bloated framwork" myth as it relates to the Symfony framework.

At work, we’re trying to choose which PHP framework to use for our next project. As we’re breaking up our monolithic app into services, only micro frameworks were considered by the team. This choice was made to avoid the pain points we’ve encountered using our current full stack framework.

Not all full stack frameworks are created equal, however. Having worked with Symfony before, I proposed it as an option. As expected, I’ve had some pushback from my fellow coworkers. The main reason being that Symfony is bloated and overkill for our needs.

He then goes on to talk about how, despite many Symfony components being used individually by other projects, the overall framework still has the reputation for bloat. He goes through some of the main points usually mentioned by the opponents:

  • Doctrine is complex/bad/slow
  • Symfony is too verbose
  • Symfony uses too much configuration

He does agree with some of the points made but usually not in the general way they've been stated. For example, while he does agree that Symfony is verbose he also points out that this verbosity provides more control to the developer as to exactly how things hook together.

tagged: symfony myth bloated framework opinion doctrine configuration verbose

Link: http://matmati.net/symfony-myth-bloated-framework/