News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Best PHP Framework for 2015 - SitePoint Survey Results
March 30, 2015 @ 11:59:00

In a new post to the SitePoint PHP blog editor Bruno Skvorc shares the results of the PHP framework survey the site posted a month back. In it they asked developers for their opinions on favorite frameworks (not necessarily the one they use, but their own personal opinion). For anyone that's been keeping up with the current state of PHP frameworks, the results aren't all that surprising though.

One month ago, we started the annual SitePoint framework popularity survey. Now that the month has expired, it's time to look at the results and to distribute the prizes. The response was a whopping ~7800 entries, far more than any other survey we've held so far, and even after filtering out invalid entries we end up with a formidable number of valid participants.

According to the results the most popular framework, by far, was Laravel. Coming in second was Symfony2 and third the Nette framework. They did ask for different opinions for personal versus business choices but the results track the same between the two. He also splits out the data into the top results by country and by the age of the people who responded.

He finishes off the post with some of his own thoughts on why Laravel was the clear winner with only some of it having to do with the framework itself. He points out the related projects, "near perfect documentation" and other things (like Laravel's own subreddit). He suggests that, even though open source and "free" tend to go together, spending money and a good amount of time on a project can help ensure it succeeds. He also offers some practical advice for those wanting to give their project a boost:

Spread the word, analyze solutions from other people, discuss them. Be open, be transparent. Have an official blog, get a StackOverflow tag, justify your decisions, get in touch with popular publications which can help promote your framework if you present it well enough.
0 comments voice your opinion now!
framework survey results opinion popularity 2015 laravel symfony2 nette

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/best-php-framework-2015-sitepoint-survey-results/

Phil Sturgeon:
PHP 7 Feature Freeze
March 16, 2015 @ 09:04:44

Phil Sturgeon has a new post to his site looking at the PHP7 feature freeze for this upcoming major PHP release (implemented as of yesterday, the 15th). In it he provides a list of features, their related RFCs and how likely they are to make it into PHP7.

Today was the feature freeze for PHP 7. That means no new votes can be started for a feature that is aimed at PHP 7.0, and would instead have to go into PHP 7.1. Instead of heading out to St Patric's Day with a bunch of New Yorkers making dubious claims about their tenuous connection to Irish ancestry as an excuse to drink, I thought it would be a good time to review some of the more recent RFCs that made it in, and those that didn't.

His list includes:

  • Remove PHP 4 Constructors
  • Spaceship Operator
  • Replacing current json extension with jsond
  • Skipping Optional Parameters for Functions
  • Constructor behaviour of internal classes
  • Reclassify E_STRICT notices

Each one has a link to the current version of the RFC, the current status and Phil's own opinion of the feature (usually just one word).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
php7 feature freeze rfc list status opinion

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/php/2015/03/15/php-7-feature-freeze/

MongoDB Blog:
Call for Feedback The New PHP and HHVM Drivers
March 12, 2015 @ 11:33:23

The MongoDB blog has a new post asking for feedback on what the user community thinks of their approach to supporting MongoDB functionality in PHP 5.x, HHVM and even out to PHP7.

Since the PHP driver first appeared on the scene, MongoDB has gone through many changes. [...] Beyond MongoDB's features, our ecosystem has also changed. [...] During the spring of 2014, we worked with a team of students from Facebook's Open Academy program to prototype an HHVM driver modeled after the 1.x API.

[...] Although the final result was not feature complete, the project was a valuable learning experience. The C driver proved quite up to the task, and HNI, which allows an HHVM extension to be written with a combination of PHP and C++, highlighted critical areas of the driver for which we'd want to use C. This all leads up to the question of how best to support PHP 5.x, HHVM, and PHP 7.0 with our next-generation driver.

They've shared the overview of the new driver structure including three layers: the system level functionality, the extensions themselves and a MongoDB userland library. They walk through the thinking on each of the pieces of the puzzle and how they all couple together to make for a more robust, flexible system that's also easy to use.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
mongodb drivers extension mongo userland library architecture opinion feedback

Link: http://www.mongodb.com/blog/post/call-feedback-new-php-and-hhvm-drivers

Coen Jacobs:
Updating PHP is everyone's responsibility
March 11, 2015 @ 10:06:46

In his latest post Coen Jacons suggests that updating PHP is everyone's responsibility - that keeping the PHP installation on your systems up to date is important for everyone, not just the system administrators.

The number one remark I heard when I launched WPupdatePHP, is that users shouldn't be bothered with this. In an ideal world, this is true, but in reality this isn't going to stand for long. [...] I know the WordPress core team is working really hard to get webhosting companies to update their PHP versions and I agree up to a certain level that this is the best way. It's not the only way though. [...] This will help lower the percentage of PHP 5.2 and 5.3 users out there. There still will be people on older PHP versions who are caught out and without them knowing what is going on, nothing will change for them.

He talks about the efforts the WordPress core team is doing to try to convince hosting providers to update, but points out that while WordPress aims to run on those old versions, staying on them is a mistake. He also mentions that an effort like this is a constant thing, always changing as the PHP versions released change. He ends the post with a "call to arms" for users out there, encouraging them to get talking to their hosting provider and get those PHP versions updated.

Don't understand me wrong, I like what WordPress is doing to get these requirements bumped, but I think it's not enough. I disagree on the fact that users shouldn't be involved in this. It's easy enough for users to request their hosting platform to be upgraded. If their request isn't heard, they should find a better webhosting company. [...] It's been long enough, I choose to act now.
0 comments voice your opinion now!
update version responsibility opinion hosting company wordpress

Link: http://coenjacobs.me/updating-php-everyones-responsibility/

Evert Pot:
PSR-7 is imminent, and here's my issues with it.
March 04, 2015 @ 09:26:37

Evert Pot has written up a new post today with some of his thoughts about what's wrong with the PSR-7 proposal in the PHP-FIG. PSR-7 relates to a standardized interface for HTTP request and response handling.

PSR-7 is pretty close to completion. PSR-7 is a new 'PHP standard recommendation', put out by the PHP-FIG group, of which I'm a member of. [...] PSR-7 gets a lot of things right, and is very close to nailing the abstract data model behind HTTP, better than many other implementations in many programming languages.

But it's not perfect. I've been pretty vocal about a few issues I have with the approach. Most of this has fallen on deaf ears. I accept that I might be a minority in feeling these are problems, but I feel compelled to share my issues here anyway. Perhaps as a last attempt to sollicit change, or maybe just to get it off my chest.

He breaks up his thoughts into a few different categories, each with a summary and sometimes some code to help make his point a bit more clear. He talks about immutability, how objects will be immutable and shows an example of change in how Silex would have to function to follow the standard (with before/after). He then goes on to talk about the "issue with streams" and how the current proposal could allow for changing of the incoming request into a new one with new headers...not immutable. He ends the post talking about PSR-7's stance on buffering responses and how, even if his project doesn't adopt the PSR in the strictest sense, they may still take some inspiration from it.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
psr7 issues opinion phpfig http standard request response

Link: http://evertpot.com/psr-7-issues/

Community News:
"Are Conference Talks Getting Too Soft?" (Adam Culp & Cal Evans)
March 03, 2015 @ 11:57:42

There's an interesting set of posts from PHP community members Adam Culp and Cal Evans each on a similar subject centering around conferences and the presentations made at them. They both wonder if talks are getting too "soft" and not focusing as much on the technology and getting in-depth as they should be. From Cal:

PHP conferences are changing very slowly, and not in a way that I like. I blame myself. As a frequent speaker I am getting lazy. I get caught up in the excitement of the CfP, I write up 5-10 abstracts and shotgun them into the CfP system hoping that something hits the mark. I've not actually written these talks. In most cases, I'm pretty sure I can get 45 minutes on the topic, but I don't know for sure because I've not bothered to write it yet. Adam Culp talks about this very thing in his post "Are Conference Talks Getting Too Soft?".

Adam points out that, while introductory talks and overviews are acceptable level coverage for someone new to the speaking scene (or development), the trend seems to be that everyone is providing less "meat" in their talks.

It is hard to teach a great amount in a 1 hour talk, but if there is not some immediately usable content an attendee will have a tough time proving to their short sighted boss that it was worth their time.

Both Adam and Cal set out a challenge, both to themselves and other speakers in the community. They encourage you to spend more time with your subjects, get in-depth into the topics, present on what you're excited about and maybe even try them out locally first.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
conference talk soft indepth opinion topic adamculp calevans

Link: http://www.geekyboy.com/archives/1076

Matthew Setter:
Can VIM Ever Replace PHPStorm?
March 02, 2015 @ 10:54:13

In an interesting new post to his site Matthew Setter wonders if an IDE like PHPStorm can be replaced by VIM, a standard in the editor community for decades.

Is it reasonable, even practical, to expect that a 30 year old application can match a modern one? Is it conceivable to be able to code as well using VIM, said 30 year old application, as I can in PhpStorm, with all the IntelliSense-lead functionality PhpStorm offers?

He starts with some of his recent experience with the editor and some of the things he's (happily) found it can do he didn't know before. He includes a screenshot of a multi-pane view, explains what each is and what he can do with them. He points out that this example is Markdown documents but it can just as easily be used for code too. Finally he talks about the subject any PHPStorm user wants to know about, the IntelliSense functionality. Unfortunately, while there are some tools he mentions that can do similar things, they don't provide the context PHPStorm can deliver.

He ends the post with an interesting question: is IntelliSense the right approach? He wonders if having more context is a better answer rather than just the auto-complete handling IntelliSense offers.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
vim editor replacement phpstorm opinion autcomplete context screenshot

Link: http://www.matthewsetter.com/can-vim-ever-replace-phpstorm/

Evert Pot:
The problem with password_hash()
February 25, 2015 @ 10:51:04

Evert Pot has shared some of his thoughts about why he has a problem with password_hash (and friends). His thoughts are initially about this particular feature but they're actually wider than that.

The initial introduction and rfc for these functions made me uneasy, and I felt like a lone voice against many in that I thought something bad was happening. I felt that they should not be added to the PHP engine. I think that we should not extend the PHP engine, when it's possible to write the same API in userland, or there are significant benefits to do it in PHP, such as performance. Since the heavy lifting of the password functions is done by underlying libraries that are already exposed to userland-PHP, it didn't make sense to me to expose it as well in the core.

He includes a list of things he sees as drawbacks for new C-based functionality in PHP including the fact that it extends the "PHP specification" and forces other projects to implement it (like HHVM). He does include a few positives, though, such as the increased visibility and legitimacy, but still thinks they don't outweigh the negatives.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
password hash core language c implementation opinion userland

Link: http://evertpot.com/password-hash-ew/

Magenticians:
On Magento 2 being "open source" - the post-mortem
February 23, 2015 @ 10:12:02

On the Magenticians site there's a new post that provides an update of sorts, a post-mortem really, about their opinion of the "open source-ness" of the Magento product and project.

Little less than four months ago, we published an opinion-piece regarding Magento 2 and why we thought it wasn't really holding up to the mindset of being an open source project. In four months, a lot has changed. [...] Magento 2 was (and still is) being marketed as a new platform which not only refreshes the entire code base, but also improves handling of the community its feedback and involvement. [...] Most of the original critique was therefore that, though by definition Magento 2 is an open source project, all the rest which should naturally come with "being open source", severely lacked. It is one of our best read articles and linked from a dozen of websites; a timely status update is in its place.

They go on to update some of their original comments and note that things "feel more like open source" with changes including direct pushes to GitHub (not mirrored) and better external communication. They point out a few other smaller things including their developer hub, updated developer documentation and more informative blog posts about the project/project.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
magento opensource postmorten improvements opinion project product

Link: http://magenticians.com/magento-2-open-source-post-mortem

Reddit.com:
So, what is PHP's nature? Anyone actually know exactly what it is?
February 13, 2015 @ 11:58:01

In this recent post to the /r/php subreddit on Reddit.com, the question is asked "what is the nature of PHP?" and how it relates to what features make it into the language and which don't.

I've heard many times that a proposed RFC/new feature got rejected by PHP internals in voting phase, since 'it does not fit the nature of PHP'. But the question is, what is PHP's nature? Does it even have a nature at all? If yes, is there a standard or guideline of what fits in PHP's nature? I think its very confusing, isnt it? Anyone actually have some insights in this?

In the comments other users provide a wide range of opinions including:

  • "I would recommend taking those types of comments with a grain of salt. PHP's nature is a very subjective topic, as you can tell by the other comments."
  • "PHP was made to make dynamic web pages at a time when webpages contained minimal dynamic content. It was made at a time when web pages doesn't required a programming language to generate."
  • "Easy to pick up and make a website for weak devs/prototypes (easy to abuse). Much of the hate for PHP is because this abuse is possible and exploited often."
  • "As someone mentioned, nobody who does any sort of web development today can ignore Javascript and they will typically be switching back and forth between Javascript and PHP every couple of minutes. This is our target user these days and as such this syntax is appropriate I think."

Check out the full post for more opinions or to voice your own!

0 comments voice your opinion now!
nature language opinion reddit

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2vmh3o/so_what_is_phps_nature_anyone_actually_know/


Community Events

Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


laravel wordpress introduction release version php7 opinion podcast language library interview community framework laravel5 extension unittest series voicesoftheelephpant api example

All content copyright, 2015 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework