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Matthew Setter:
Can VIM Ever Replace PHPStorm?
March 02, 2015 @ 10:54:13

In an interesting new post to his site Matthew Setter wonders if an IDE like PHPStorm can be replaced by VIM, a standard in the editor community for decades.

Is it reasonable, even practical, to expect that a 30 year old application can match a modern one? Is it conceivable to be able to code as well using VIM, said 30 year old application, as I can in PhpStorm, with all the IntelliSense-lead functionality PhpStorm offers?

He starts with some of his recent experience with the editor and some of the things he's (happily) found it can do he didn't know before. He includes a screenshot of a multi-pane view, explains what each is and what he can do with them. He points out that this example is Markdown documents but it can just as easily be used for code too. Finally he talks about the subject any PHPStorm user wants to know about, the IntelliSense functionality. Unfortunately, while there are some tools he mentions that can do similar things, they don't provide the context PHPStorm can deliver.

He ends the post with an interesting question: is IntelliSense the right approach? He wonders if having more context is a better answer rather than just the auto-complete handling IntelliSense offers.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
vim editor replacement phpstorm opinion autcomplete context screenshot

Link: http://www.matthewsetter.com/can-vim-ever-replace-phpstorm/

Evert Pot:
The problem with password_hash()
February 25, 2015 @ 10:51:04

Evert Pot has shared some of his thoughts about why he has a problem with password_hash (and friends). His thoughts are initially about this particular feature but they're actually wider than that.

The initial introduction and rfc for these functions made me uneasy, and I felt like a lone voice against many in that I thought something bad was happening. I felt that they should not be added to the PHP engine. I think that we should not extend the PHP engine, when it's possible to write the same API in userland, or there are significant benefits to do it in PHP, such as performance. Since the heavy lifting of the password functions is done by underlying libraries that are already exposed to userland-PHP, it didn't make sense to me to expose it as well in the core.

He includes a list of things he sees as drawbacks for new C-based functionality in PHP including the fact that it extends the "PHP specification" and forces other projects to implement it (like HHVM). He does include a few positives, though, such as the increased visibility and legitimacy, but still thinks they don't outweigh the negatives.

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password hash core language c implementation opinion userland

Link: http://evertpot.com/password-hash-ew/

Magenticians:
On Magento 2 being "open source" - the post-mortem
February 23, 2015 @ 10:12:02

On the Magenticians site there's a new post that provides an update of sorts, a post-mortem really, about their opinion of the "open source-ness" of the Magento product and project.

Little less than four months ago, we published an opinion-piece regarding Magento 2 and why we thought it wasn't really holding up to the mindset of being an open source project. In four months, a lot has changed. [...] Magento 2 was (and still is) being marketed as a new platform which not only refreshes the entire code base, but also improves handling of the community its feedback and involvement. [...] Most of the original critique was therefore that, though by definition Magento 2 is an open source project, all the rest which should naturally come with "being open source", severely lacked. It is one of our best read articles and linked from a dozen of websites; a timely status update is in its place.

They go on to update some of their original comments and note that things "feel more like open source" with changes including direct pushes to GitHub (not mirrored) and better external communication. They point out a few other smaller things including their developer hub, updated developer documentation and more informative blog posts about the project/project.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
magento opensource postmorten improvements opinion project product

Link: http://magenticians.com/magento-2-open-source-post-mortem

Reddit.com:
So, what is PHP's nature? Anyone actually know exactly what it is?
February 13, 2015 @ 11:58:01

In this recent post to the /r/php subreddit on Reddit.com, the question is asked "what is the nature of PHP?" and how it relates to what features make it into the language and which don't.

I've heard many times that a proposed RFC/new feature got rejected by PHP internals in voting phase, since 'it does not fit the nature of PHP'. But the question is, what is PHP's nature? Does it even have a nature at all? If yes, is there a standard or guideline of what fits in PHP's nature? I think its very confusing, isnt it? Anyone actually have some insights in this?

In the comments other users provide a wide range of opinions including:

  • "I would recommend taking those types of comments with a grain of salt. PHP's nature is a very subjective topic, as you can tell by the other comments."
  • "PHP was made to make dynamic web pages at a time when webpages contained minimal dynamic content. It was made at a time when web pages doesn't required a programming language to generate."
  • "Easy to pick up and make a website for weak devs/prototypes (easy to abuse). Much of the hate for PHP is because this abuse is possible and exploited often."
  • "As someone mentioned, nobody who does any sort of web development today can ignore Javascript and they will typically be switching back and forth between Javascript and PHP every couple of minutes. This is our target user these days and as such this syntax is appropriate I think."

Check out the full post for more opinions or to voice your own!

0 comments voice your opinion now!
nature language opinion reddit

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2vmh3o/so_what_is_phps_nature_anyone_actually_know/

Anthony Ferrara:
Scalar Types and PHP
February 12, 2015 @ 11:25:47

Anthony Ferrara has tossed his own hat into the ring around the debate that's been going about the RFC for scalar type hints in PHP. In his post he agrees with (most of) the suggestions made in the proposal around strict, weak and the "compromise" of mixed typing.

There's currently a proposal that's under vote to add Pascal Martin's excellent post about it. What I want to talk about is more of an opinion. Why I believe this is the correct approach to the problem.

He starts off talking about the "all strict" angle that some suggested as the proper approach then moves into the "weak argument" explaining the difference between the two. He shares a bit of history around the problems detecting subtle bugs caused by typing issues and how it is definitely a problem that needs solving. Finally, he talks about the mixed-typing compromise and provides some code samples showing a common bug that can happen with weak typing.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
scalar type hint rfc opinion example weak compromise mixedtype

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2015/02/scalar-types-and-php.html

Pascal Martin:
In favor of RFC "Scalar Type Hints"
February 09, 2015 @ 09:40:18

Pascal Martin has a new post today sharing some of his thoughts around one of the currently proposed PHP RFCs for < href="http://blog.pascal-martin.fr/post/in-favor-of-rfc-scalar-type-hints.html">scalar type hinting. PHP has had type hints for custom objects and some things like arrays but this proposal would add in additional ones for things like "string", "int" and "float".

The Scalar Type Hints RFC for PHP 7 has first been initialized in December 2014. It went on with version 0.2 at the middle of January 2015, after changing several major ideas, and is now in version 0.3, integrating return types, as RFC Return Type Declarations has been accepted a few days ago. [...] I've been following this RFC (and the previous ones) with some interest, and, as I've taken some time to play with it a bit last week, building PHP from the sources of the corresponding Git branch, I'll try summarizing here why I think it is interesting. Please note this is my personal opinion.

He starts with a look at what the proposal entails around these new scalar type hints and why he thinks they're a good idea. He looks at some of the things that PHP's current weak typing allows and how it has made the language very flexible as a result. He also shows how the proposal suggests the use of the "declare" function to define a strict typing constant to essentially turn on the checking only where needed. He provides a few code snippet example including object/method handling, setting a custom error handler and which of the calls work in which typing method. He finishes the post looking at the "per-file" idea of enabling the strict typing checks and some of his confusion around the point. He also talks about return types, the directives that are proposed to enable the feature and the current status of the RFC.

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scalar type hint rfc summary proposal php7 opinion overview

Link: http://blog.pascal-martin.fr/post/in-favor-of-rfc-scalar-type-hints.html

Piotr Pasich:
ClassManager - You shall not pass
January 30, 2015 @ 11:42:55

Piotr Pasich has shared some thoughts on naming in his latest post to his site today. In it he talks about one of the "hardest things in computer science" (naming things) and makes some recommendations to help you make naming in your code more effective.

Precise names for classes is notoriously difficult. Done right, it makes code more self-documenting and provides a vocabulary for reasoning about code at a higher level of abstraction. There are a couple simple tips&tricks to make the names more readable: do not abbreviate, do not add any extra informations (underscore, type), avoid single letter prefixes, etc etc.

But what if you already know and use those rules and you still want to improve naming in your code? I assume that you care, you're not selfish and you think about elses when you write the code. You ask one of the most important question to yourself, during architecture implementation - how the fellow sitting next to will behave while reading the code.

He's broken up the remainder of the post into different sections, each with a high level recommendation and some follow up description:

  • Ask somebody else
  • Does it have a single responsibility you can name?
  • Simple Superclass Name
  • Qualified Subclass Name
  • Adding 'Interface' word

He ends with a few names to avoid (like *Manager, *Helper or *Handler) to help prevent ambiguity. He reinforces providing meaning in your naming and making it easier for others to understand what's going on.

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classmanager naming opinion recommendation avoid meaning

Link: http://piotrpasich.com/classmanager-you-shall-not-pass/

Michael Kimsal:
Purpose of Benchmarking Framework Speed
January 30, 2015 @ 09:53:57

In his new post Michael Kimsal shares some of his thoughts about framework benchmarking especially in the context of speed.

I've followed the techempower benchmarks, and every now and then I check out benchmarks of various projects (usually PHP) to see what the relative state of things are. Inevitably, someone points out that "these aren't testing anything 'real world' - they're useless!". Usually it's from someone who's favorite framework has 'lost'. I used to think along the same lines; namely that "hello world" benchmarks don't measure anything useful. I don't hold quite the same position anymore, and I'll explain why.

He goes on to talk about the purpose of using a framework and what kind of functionality they should provide. The usefulness of a framework is measured in what tools it provides and how easy it makes them to use. Benchmarks are only about speed, performance and overhead.

What those benchmark results are telling you is "this is about the fastest this framework's request cycle can be invoked while doing essentially nothing". [...] These benchmarks are largely about establishing that baseline expectation of performance. I'd say that they're not always necessarily presented that way, but this is largely the fault of the readers.

He refutes some of the common arguments about increasing performance of an application using a framework (like "just throw hardware at it"). He points out that, even with other improvements, it may come to a point where your framework of choice has become too slow and you need to move on. Think about maintainability too, though, and what you're switching from or to when considering making a move.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
benchmark framework speed purpose opinion feature maintainability scalability

Link: http://michaelkimsal.com/blog/purpose-of-framework-benchmarking-speed/

Paul Jones:
MVC and ADR are User-Interface Patterns, Not Application Architectures
January 26, 2015 @ 11:51:26

In response to a recent post from Anthony Ferrara about MVC Paul Jones suggests that Anthony's view that it and related structures "all pretend to be application architectures" is false.

The central mistake I think Anthony makes is near the end of this post, where he states (in talking about MVC, ADR, et al.) that "All Pretend To Be Application Architectures." That assertion strikes me as incorrect. While it may be that developers using MVC may mistakenly think of MVC as an application architecture, the pattern description itself makes no such claim. Indeed, Fowler categorizes MVC as a "Web Presentation Pattern" and not as an "Application Architecture" per se. [...] Fowler's categorization and description of MVC define it pretty clearly as a user interface pattern. ADR, as a refinement of MVC, is likewise a user interface pattern.

He goes on to talk more about the ADR (Action-Domain-Responder) pattern, how it's more of a user interface pattern as well and how that relates to using it for HTTP requests. He suggests that the definition from Anthony may be a bit too broad and proposes the alternative "All Are User Interface Patterns, Not Entire Application Architectures" to be a bit more specific.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
opinion adr actiondomainresponder mvc modelviewcontroller deisgnpattern userinterface

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6079

Reddit.com:
What changes would you like to see in PHP 7?
January 20, 2015 @ 12:51:08

In the /r/php subreddit on Reddit.com a question was posed to the community: What changes would you like to see in PHP 7?. So far there's 80+ answers with a wide variety of responses.

As well as massive performance improvements, PHP 7's change / feature list is already looking great. You can find most of the features that have been accepted or are under discussion on the PHP Dev Wiki: RFCs section. But what changes would make a difference to you? What would you really like to see make it in (already suggested or a new suggestion)?

Here's just a few of the suggestions made by fellow Reddit users:

  • fixing inconsistencies in naming
  • sandboxed eval
  • a complete rework of the standard library
  • the introduction of generics
  • adding enum functionality
  • type aliasing
  • stack traces for fatal errors

Check out the full post for more ideas and feedback from other members of the community too. It's an interesting list of suggestions, some that are even already in the works.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
php7 changes reddit opinion community language feature improvement

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2sx5x3/what_changes_would_you_like_to_see_in_php_7/


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