Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Hackermoon.com:
Why you should learn Symfony in 2017
Jul 18, 2017 @ 12:39:09

On the Hackermoon site there's a new post from developer advocate Mickaël Andrieu sharing a few reasons why he thinks you should learn Symfony in 2017 if you haven't already.

In 2011, when I started my studies in computer sciences I learned the PHP using symfony 1.3, and I realized my very first student project on the beta of Symfony 2. At the time, we were moving from a fully integrated full stack framework with a back office provided to a framework that followed what was found in the Java community: besides, many components of Symfony2 were strongly inspired by JEE.

PHP 5.3 had just come out and with it the ability to start designing object-oriented correctly. [...] Large Open Source projects have started to migrate on Symfony components: if it was not first, SensioLabs has talked a lot about Drupal8 because it is one of the biggest CMS on the market. EzPublish, PHPBB, PrestaShop and many others followed, some with a full stack framework approach and others by incorporating only a few software bricks.

He then talks about the "vibrant and mature ecosystem", listing some of the packages that use Symfony components. He also looks forward to the next major iteration of the framework: Symfony Flex. He ends with his reasoning why you should learn Symfony if you haven't worked with it (or at least how it handles common things like requests and services).

tagged: learn symfony framework ecosystem future symfonyflex opinion

Link: https://hackernoon.com/why-you-should-learn-symfony-in-2017-e0cf564f0b21

Zend Framework Blog:
Zend Framework and PHP 7.1
Jun 07, 2017 @ 12:18:45

On the Zend Framework blog Matthew Weier O'Phinney has a new post covering the state of the Zend Framework project and how it relates to PHP 7.1.

When we announced Zend Framework 3 last year, one of the changes was setting the minimum supported PHP version to 5.6. Our initial plan was to support 5.6 until it reaches end-of-life, which occurs 31 December 2018.

PHP 5.6, however, stopped receiving active support almost five months ago, on 19 Jan 2017. This means that it is no longer receiving bugfixes, only critical security fixes. As such, a number of contributors have been pushing for us to up our minimum supported version to support only actively supported PHP versions, which would mean only PHP 7 versions.

[...] Our view is that the new features in PHP 7 will allow us to simplify our code dramatically, reduce bugs (primarily by increasing type safety), make our code more easily maintainable (less code required to check types; less repetitive code), provide stronger and more predictable interfaces to our users, and simultaneously provide users access to more and better language features.

He also talks briefly about their thoughts about HHVM support and if it makes sense to keep moving forward with it (given the small percentage of their user base). He then lays out a plan for the framework moving forward that includes the release of PHP 7.1+ only components and security patches on 5.6 versions until end of life.

tagged: zendframework php71 version future roadmap php56 hhvm project

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-06-06-zf-php-7-1.html

Symfony Finland:
What's in store for PHP performance?
Oct 18, 2016 @ 10:20:51

On the Symfony Finland blog there's a new post looking ahead at what they see in store for PHP's performance in a post-PHP 7.0.x world.

PHP 7.0 made significant improvements in terms of performance and memory use for real applications. Many applications deliver twice the throughput with much less memory just without any changes to the application code.

But with networked API driven architectures individual response times are increasingly critical for end-user experience. Luckily, there are quite a few unbeaten paths for regarding PHP performance.

These other "unbeaten paths" they mention include a trend towards using asynchronous patterns and the use of application servers (long running PHP processes). There's also mentions of JIT (just in time) compilation, defined request and response objects and the improvement of other possible PHP runtimes.

tagged: language future performance improvement opinion

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/whats-in-store-for-php-performance

SitePoint PHP Blog:
The past, Present and Future of the PHP-FIG
Sep 16, 2016 @ 13:17:40

On the SitePoint PHP blog Larry Garfield, a member of the PHP-FIG group, has written up an article covering the past, present and future of the PHP-FIG. In it he tries to give readers a perspective on where the group came from, some of the growth they've seen along the way and, finally, the proposal for PHP-FIG 3.0 - a restructuring of the organization based on things they've learned so far.

The PHP Framework Interoperability Group (PHP-FIG, or just FIG for short) is at a crossroads. Many electrons have been sacrificed talking about FIG’s tribulations of late, but sadly much of it has been FUD, with little effort spent on the positive. At SitePoint’s invitation, I’d like to offer a more positive outlook on FIG and the PHP community, and demonstrate why FIG can, and should, continue to have a positive impact on the PHP ecosystem.

He starts with where the group began (an "uncomfortable beginning") at php[tek] 2015 and the proposal/passing of the PSR-0 autoloading specification soon after. He then gets into the "slow but steady growth" the group had over the next several years and some of the groups that became involved (not just framework projects either). He covers some of the other PSRs created/passed, the impact they've made on the community and the growing pains they've gone through. He ends the post talking about the PHP-FIG 3.0 proposal and some of the support, opposition and discussion that has come along with that.

tagged: phpfig article past present future organization framework interoperability phpfig3

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/the-past-present-and-future-of-the-php-fig/

Jason McCreary:
Laravel Shift - 1,000 applications upgraded
Sep 14, 2016 @ 10:27:41

Jason McCreary, the developer behind the Laravel Shift upgrade service, has posted a retrospective of his work on the project and some of the things he's learned along the way. The service just recently topped 1000 applications upgraded.

Less than a year ago I created Laravel Shift. While not my first product, it is my first software as a service (SaaS). If you’re not familiar with Laravel Shift or interested in the backstory check out the Q&A on Laravel News or listen to the interview on Full Stack Radio.

In this post, I want to focus more on reaching the milestone of 1,000 Laravel applications upgraded. This may not sound like many, however for my first SaaS product it marks the achievement of my stretch goal. So allow me to share the most important decision, biggest challenge, and what the future holds for Laravel Shift.

He starts with a section talking about the difference between a "project" and a "product" targeted at developers who, usually, have more than one project going at a time. He talks about his decision to move Shift to a "product" and some of the hurdles he hit because of being "a developer, not a marketer". He finishes the post looking ahead to things coming with the service and the announcement of "human services" being offered to get a live person involved in the upgrade of your Laravel application.

tagged: laravel shift service retrospective future plans 1k upgrade milestone

Link: http://jason.pureconcepts.net/2016/09/laravel-shift-1000-applications-upgraded/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Do PHP and IoT Have a Future Together?
Jul 05, 2016 @ 09:54:23

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a post from editor Bruno Skvorc wondering if PHP and IoT have a future together. The "Internet of Things" (IoT) is a technology sector that has been growing by leaps and bounds over the past few years as more and more devices become internet-aware and connected.

It’s IoT Week at SitePoint! [...] A whole week of mostly IoT resources on every channel and, yes, that includes PHP. What? “PHP and IoT!? Surely you’re mistaken!”, you must be thinking. No, dear reader. PHP and IoT go well together – better than one might expect.

In this post, we’ll list some getting started resources. Throughout the remainder of the week, we’ll have some amazing hands on posts for you – everything from creating a drinks machine with PHP, to a real life alarm when a door in Minecraft opens (yes, really!) – and that’s just on our channel. Be sure to check out the others, too!

The remainder of the post is then broken down into two sections: hardware and software/tutorials. In each there's plenty of links to articles, libraries, pieces of IoT hardware (low level, not consumer) and various PHP libraries that can help you get integrated quickly.

tagged: future internetofthings iot hardware software libraries listing

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/do-php-and-iot-have-a-future-together/

PHP Roundtable:
041: The PHP-FIG: Past, Present & Future
Mar 10, 2016 @ 09:17:10

The PHP Rountable podcast, hosted by Sammy Kaye Powers has published their latest episode - Episode #41: The PHP-FIG: Past, Present & Future.

The PHP-FIG has really helped the PHP community get onboard the collaboration train with really great standards like the PSR-4 autoloading standard and the PSR-7 HTTP message interfaces.

We discuss PSR-0 through PSR-13 and the process they go through to become standards. We also discuss where the FIG came from and the possible big changes coming to the organization soon.

This episode features a large group of guests, all related to the PHP-FIG in some way:

You can watch this episode either through the in-page video player or directly over on Youtube. Be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates on when the latest episodes are being recorded and are released.

tagged: phproundtable podcast ep41 phpfig past present future video

Link: https://www.phproundtable.com/episode/the-php-framework-interop-group-past-present-future

Cloudways Blog:
Zeev Suraski, Co-Founder Of Zend Technologies, Talks About Future Of PHP
Dec 02, 2015 @ 11:18:35

The Cloudways blog has posted an interview with Zeev Suraski, one of the founders of Zend Technologies and large contributor to the PHP 3 release.

Zeev Suraski needs no introduction. He is the Co-founder of Zend Technologies and is credited for some exceptional work around development during his career. In 1997, he created PHP 3 with his friend, Andi Gutmans. The name Zend is basically derived from Zeev and Andi.

Zeev’s contribution to PHP can never be ignored because it was his efforts from his early days that actually resulted in more than 20 million PHP based websites. He made significant contributions in writing the Zend engine and is also a member of Apache Software Foundation. I had the honor of interviewing Zeev, where he shared his experiences and thoughts.

In the interview Zeev answers questions about:

  • how he got started with PHP and why he became "a PHP guy"
  • his story about how he got into programming in general
  • the work he and Andi did for PHP 3
  • his opinion on PHP frameworks
  • his view of PHP moving forward including PHP 7

There's plenty more great content here so if you've ever wondered some about the history of the language and where Zeev fits in it all I'd suggest giving it a read.

tagged: cloudways zeevsuraski zend zendtechnologies interview future language

Link: http://www.cloudways.com/blog/zend-co-founder-zeev-suraski-interview/

Zend Developer Zone:
PHP 7 and Beyond: The Future of PHP – Anthony Ferrara at PHP World
Nov 25, 2015 @ 11:56:26

On the Zend Developer Zone they've posted about a presentation given by Anthony Ferrara at this year's php[world] conference that just wrapped up in Washington, D.C. In it he talks about the future of PHP, PHP 7 and beyond.

PHPWorld was a great conference. If you didn’t attend, you missed a lot. Several of the keynotes just rocked the house including both Lorna Mitchell and Tessa Mero. The highlight for me however was Anthony Ferrara’s closing keynote, “PHP 7 and Beyond: The Future of PHP”. Anthony is a Core developer but also a vibrant member of the community.

Anthony is a good friend of mine but this is the first time I have ever had the chance to see him deliver a keynote talk. I do hope it won’t be the last. The recording of Anthony’s talk is embedded below the storify. I highly recommend watching it.

He (Cal Evans) includes his set of live tweets from during the presentation as well as an embedded version of the video if you'd like to watch the entire thing. It was also posted to YouTube if you prefer to watch it there.

tagged: phpworld15 anthonyferrara php7 beyond keynote future language community

Link: http://devzone.zend.com/6927/php-7-and-beyond-the-future-of-php-anthony-ferrara-at-php-world/

Sound of Symfony Podcast:
Episode 9 - The past and future of Symfony
Nov 23, 2015 @ 11:19:01

The Sound of Symfony podcast is back today with their latest episodes and some special changes - Episode #9: The past and future of Symfony.

Sound of Symfony is back from its unplanned hiatus and launching a new format. We're also switching things up, and add two new co-hosts, Ryan Weaver and Jared Farrish.

This episode's topic is "How has Symfony kept up".

Topics mentioned in this episode include the NelmioApiDocBundle, the HATEOAS library from William Durand and a pull request for dynamic environment variables to Symfony. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 of the episode directly. Be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for the latest updates as new episodes are released.

tagged: soundofsymfony podcast ep9 past future framework ryanweaver jaredfarrish

Link: http://www.soundofsymfony.com/episode/episode-9