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Nikola Poša:
Factory as a Service
Feb 19, 2018 @ 10:53:16

In a post to his site Nikola Poša looks at a method that can be used to provide a slightly different object from a dependency injection container based on other criteria: making use of a factory as a service.

Dependency Injection Containers are a great invention - when used the right way, they allow us to keep our factories and assembly logic of services outside the core business logic of our application.

By default, a service created is shared, meaning that exactly the same instance will be returned whenever service is retrieved from a container. This is a desired behaviour in most of the cases. [...] Yet certain use cases may require services to be created conditionally during runtime, such as for example based on the value of a parameter resolved from the current request.

He first covers some of the anti-patterns that could be used to resolve this issue: a setter method on the returned object, using a service manager or creating a static factory instead. He offers a solution to the problem that makes use of a factory inside of the DI container. This factory then uses configuration values from the container to set up the object and return it.

tagged: factory service dependency injection tutorial database connection

Link: https://blog.nikolaposa.in.rs/2018/02/16/factory-as-a-service/

Matt Allan:
Writing Protobuf Services in PHP
Jan 29, 2018 @ 10:56:12

Matt Allan has a new post to his site sharing some of his experience in using PHP to write Protobuf services. Protobuf (short for "protocol buffers") are a language-agnostic data structure that allows for easy serialization.

Lately I’ve been investigating Protobuf as a replacement for JSON RPC services. If you aren’t familiar with Protobuf, it’s a language neutral serialization format from Google. It’s most commonly associated with Google’s RPC framework gRPC but it can be used standalone too. In this guide we are going to build a simple calculator RPC service using nothing but the Protobuf compiler and PHP.

The post starts by creating a ".proto" file, defining the structure of the data to be consumed. He includes the definition for the service itself, showing how to define a basic "Calculator" service with "add" and "subtract" methods. From there he defines the request and response formats for the data. The definitions are then compiled and classes are generated from the definitions. Switching to the PHP side, he sets up Composer autoloading and pulls in the google/protobuf package. Next comes the PHP code to work with the service and serving it up via the built-in server. Finally, he shares the code to create a client for the service and uses it to make some requests.

tagged: protobuf service protocolbuffer google tutorial webservice

Link: http://mattallan.org/posts/protobuf-php-services/

Pineco.de:
Simple PDF Rendering with Laravel
Dec 06, 2017 @ 10:48:37

On the Pineco.de site they've posted a tutorial showing you how to use the Laravel framework to generate PDFs with content provided from the system. To accomplish the content-to-PDF conversion, they make use of the dompdf library.

PDF generation is a core feature when our app contains invoicing or services that require a downloadable version of an information schema. Like in many other situations, a simple solution would do it instead of a full-featured package. Let’s see how to render PDFs easily.

Once the package is pulled in via Composer they add in a custom configuration to handle some of the basic settings including the paths to the fonts, the paper size and what DPI to use to render the final product. With that in place the post starts in on creating the custom PDF service, extending the Dompdf class and adding in a bit more Laravel-specific functionality for the service. After explaining this code they move on to updating the container to include the service via a provider and show the creation of a simple PDF controller. This controller uses the service to generate PDF output from the data in their invoice object and stream the results directly back to the client.

tagged: pdf rendering laravel dompdf tutorial service provider

Link: https://pineco.de/simple-pdf-rendering-laravel/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Let’s Compare: RunCloud vs Forge vs ServerPilot
Sep 26, 2017 @ 12:27:01

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new post that compares three deployment tools to help you manage your VPS servers: RunCloud vs Forge vs ServerPilot.

When your website or web application has outgrown your shared hosting account, it is time to move it to the cloud, or into a virtual private server (VPS). [...] However, I can recall when I wanted to move my website to Amazon Web Services a few years ago, and it took me days to deploy the server and get it ready with PHP, MySQL and Apache.

Fortunately, that is not the case today as we have the help of some cool tools and third party services. I took a look at three similar services – RunCloud, ServerPilot and Laravel Forge – and compared them to see which performs best.

The post then walks through each service showing how to set up an account and talking about the pros and cons. Screenshots are included showing the UI and the steps you'll need to set up servers and providers. The post ends with a look at performance tests on the resulting VPSes including information like time of request completion, response time and successful/failed transactions. These results show a clear leader as far as performance results - Laravel Forge - but there are some reminders that performance is only part of what you should consider when selecting a service.

tagged: service comparison vps management runcloud forge serverpilot

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/lets-compare-runcloud-vs-forge-vs-serverpilot/

Peter Lafferty:
HTTP Request Validation With Silex
Sep 18, 2017 @ 12:15:48

On his Medium blog Peter Lafferty has written up a post showing you a method for HTTP request validation in Silex, the microframework from the creators of Symfony.

This article covers three validation scenarios: routes, query strings [and] POST with a JSON body.

He starts with a simple Silex application that creates a "RESTful" API with endpoints providing emojis back when queried (three endpoints). He then uses this to show how to validate:

  • routes for their expected values in the URL
  • using a ValidatorService provider to build a set of assertions (GET request)
  • using the same service to create assertions for the JSON content of a POST request

All code required is included in the post including the correct handling of the emoji output via a UTF-8 JSON response handler.

tagged: http validation silex tutorial service assert url get post

Link: https://medium.com/@peter.lafferty/http-request-validation-with-silex-9ebd7fb37f37

TutsPlus.com:
How to Register & Use Laravel Service Providers
Jul 20, 2017 @ 14:08:19

On the TutsPlus.com site they've posted a new tutorial showing you how to register and use service providers in Laravel and how it relates to the service container functionality.

If you've ever come across the Laravel framework, it's highly unlikely that you haven't heard of service containers and service providers. In fact, they're the backbone of the Laravel framework and do all the heavy lifting when you launch an instance of any Laravel application.

In this article, we're going to have a glimpse of what the service container is all about, and following that we'll discuss the service provider in detail. In the course of this article, I'll also demonstrate how to create a custom service provider in Laravel.

The article starts with an overview of the service container and service providers, describing what they are and providing some example code/configuration to clarify the concepts. It then gets into the creation of your own custom service provider. In their case they create a provider that doesn't really do anything but it does help to show how to make it, register it and put it to use in a controller.

tagged: tutorial register use laravel service provider serviceprovider container

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-register-use-laravel-service-providers--cms-28966

Cal Evans:
Mautic Step 1 – Configuring an Email Service Provider
Jun 26, 2017 @ 10:30:17

Cal Evans has continued his series covering Mautic, the PHP based self-hosted marketing automation platform. This is step one in the process with his previous post in the series introducing Mautic and why he's trying it out.

This is the second post in a series titled “My Journey into Mautic”. If you are starting here, you might get an incomplete picture, you may want to check out the previous articles.

There are two things that really confuse me about Mautic, properly configuring an Email Service Provider (ESP), and segmenting & tagging. We’ll tackle the latter one in a later post, but the former is an important topic. It is also one that I do not fully understand. What is presented here is what I have learned through trial and error. it my be partially or wholly incorrect. If you find something that I’ve gotten wrong, please, by all means, correct me in the comments.

He starts by defining what an ESP service is and what it's useful for. While he had done the self-hosted email server in the past, he recommends paying for a service these days, deciding for his needs on Mailgun. He covers the difference between transactional and broadcast emails followed by the setup process he followed to get Mailgun up and working with his Mautic install.

tagged: series mautic marketing automation selfhosted platform tutorial email service provider

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2017/06/25/mautic-step-1-configuring-an-email-service-provider/

Symfony Blog:
The new Symfony 3.3 Service Configuration Changes Explained
May 23, 2017 @ 10:15:27

On the Symfony blog, there's an article posted by Ryan Weaver helping to explain the new service configuration changes that are included with version 3.3 of the framework.

In less than 2 weeks, Symfony 3.3 will be released. It comes with a lot of new stuff, but there is one feature that stands out: the new service configuration. I am very excited about these changes: they're designed to accelerate development, make Symfony easier to learn and encourage best-practices (e.g. injecting specific dependencies instead of using $container->get())... without sacrificing predictability and stability.

The post includes an example of what the new configuration file format will look like and briefly explains some of the changes. For those interested in a more in-depth look, they also link to this page in the Symfony documentation that goes through the changes step by step. It covers the autowiring by default, autoload of services, controllers being registered as services and more. If you're planning on making the move up to v3.3 when it's released (or sometime after) definitely check out this guide to make the transition easier.

tagged: symfony framework service configuration changes explained documentation

Link: http://symfony.com/doc/master/service_container/3.3-di-changes.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a Social Network with Laravel and Stream? Easy!
Apr 19, 2017 @ 13:53:03

Christopher Vundi has continued his series covering the integration of Laravel and the Stream service in this new tutorial. In the first post he showed how to add "follow" handling to the application, complete with a real-time stream event when it happens. In this new post he uses some of the same handling to enhance this to a larger "social network" type application.

In the previous post, we saw how to add the follow functionality to a Laravel app. We also looked at how to configure our app to use Stream. This part will focus on: configuring our models in order to make it possible to track activities, the different types of feeds that Stream provides, getting feeds from Stream [and] rendering the different types of feeds in a view.

He starts in with the "activity field" functionality, a base level object that stores each event that happens in the system and is then relayed to Stream. Then, using the included "feed manager" in the Stream package, he shows how to use built-in feeds and add in a custom feed for follow and unfollow events. The tutorial then walks through the output process of the events, handling of the updates from Stream and routing those back out to the waiting news feed on the frontend.

tagged: social network follow event stream streamio service tutorial series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/building-social-network-laravel-stream-easy/

Adam Culp:
Easy Docker dev environments for PHP with CloudEstuary
Apr 17, 2017 @ 15:14:09

Adam Culp has written up a new post to his site showing you how to use the CloudEstuary service to easily create Docker development environments for your day to day work.

Lately I’ve been messing around with Docker, and specifically with containerizing PHP applications to perform quick services, such as static analysis of PHP code, compatibility of existing PHP code to specific versions of PHP, and performing security checks on PHP libraries included in my projects. However, I’ve not created a development environment for my projects using Docker.

[...] But today I found another way [besides using Vagrant]. A way to easily create PHP development environments with Docker. The fine folks at CloudEstuary have created an easy to use web-based tool to create PHP development environments (yml files) for use with Docker-compose.

He then walks you through the process of creating a new environment, selecting the framework to be installed by default and other "add-ons" to be include (it also allows for the addition of workers). After clicking on the "Generate Docker Compose" button the service spits out the YAML configuration file you can then use to create the environment. There's a few tweaks he recommends making to the config and, finally, the command to use the configuration and bring the environment up.

tagged: docker cloudestuary service compose tutorial configuration

Link: http://www.geekyboy.com/archives/1321