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Marc Morera:
Composer Install in CI
Sep 29, 2015 @ 10:48:38

In this post to his site Marc Morera talks about Composer dependencies and an issue that can come up with two things: having a large number of dependencies and minimum PHP version requirements (and when they change).

Any final project needs a lot of dependencies, and even if your composer.json file is small, you may need a dependency with a lot of dependencies. [...] Computing the real dependencies in my environment seems a great solution, right? I run composer update in my computer, I update the composer.lock version in the repository, and then I only need to do composer install. What I reduce here is the computing time of all recursive dependencies from 20+ minutes to less than 5 minutes. [...] Why this is a bad solution?

He explains that some projects will change the PHP version requirement in a minor version, potentially causing your build to break on other versions without you changing anything. He points out that there's "no good solution" he sees but does recommend good upkeep of your composer.json as a composer update is the best course of action. He also makes recommendations to the library developers about keeping requirements scope as wide as possible and only defining specifics when the project is finalized.

tagged: composer install continuous integration update dependencies

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2015/09/28/composer-install-in-ci/

Barry vd. Heuvel:
Using local repositories to easily install private Magento extensions with Compose
Sep 22, 2015 @ 09:02:26

In a post over on Medium.com Barry vd. Heuvel shows you how to use a recently added feature of Composer, the ability to use local repositories, to install Magento extensions quickly and easily.

I’m a fan of using Composer (in- and outside Magento), so I like to use that option. This works great for free packages listed on Magento connect or Firegento Packages, because you can just require the packages and run composer update. [...] This is all great for public packages, which are download through the Firegento repository. But what about private packages? Ideally we could also use Composer for the packages we purchase. [...] In this blog I’d like to explain how to tackle these 2 problems, so you can keep using the Composer workflow.

He walks you through the two steps you'll need to set up the module so it can be installed via Composer: creating a mapping (package.xml) and the composer.json. For the first he recommends using the Magerun modman tool to help with this. Creating/updating thecomposer.json file to work with the extensions is relatively easy. He makes use of the "path repositories" functionality to points the package at the "extensions/" directory using wildcards in the path name to allow for inclusion of all extensions without having to list each one (see this PR). Finally, to help make the process a bit more clear, he walks through a full example using the Amasty module.

tagged: magento composer install local repository extension packagexml tutorial

Link: https://medium.com/@barryvdh/using-local-repositories-to-easily-install-private-magento-extensions-with-composer-7eb966dec23e

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Fixing Version Issues When Running Composer from a Branch
Sep 11, 2015 @ 10:55:04

Matthew Weier O'Phinney has posted an article to his site showing you how to fix version issues in branches when using Composer packages and libraries in your applications.

For the Zend Framework component repositories, we occasionally need to backport changes to the 2.4 LTS releases. This requires checking out a branch based off the last LTS tag, applying patches (often with edits to translate PHP 5.5 syntax to PHP 5.3), and running tests against PHP 5.3 and 5.4.

Of course, to run the tests, you need the correct set of dependencies installed. If you have any component dependencies, that means running a composer update to ensure that you get the 2.4 versions of those components. And that's where my story begins.

He talks about some of the issues he's come across when testing components and Composer, not understanding that the environment has changed, does not load the correct versions of the necessary libraries. He first tried to fix the dependencies himself, adjusting the version numbers required but with no luck. Finally he stumbled across something on the Composer site that helped: the ability to define a "root version" environment variable that made it adhere to the versions he needed.

tagged: composer dependency branch issue incompatible environment variable

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2015-09-09-composer-root.html

How to create a PSR-4 PHP package
Sep 09, 2015 @ 10:55:01

In a tutorial posted to the Cullit.com site Philip Brown shows you how to create a PSR-4 compliant package that can be installed quickly and easily through Composer. The PSR-4 standard is a part of the set of standards defined by the PHP Framework Interoperability Group (PHP-FIG) to help make it easier to work with libraries and tools across frameworks and platforms. The PSR-4 standard replaces the slightly more complex PSR-0 to define a pattern for autoloading files.

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a tutorial on the general principles behind building PHP packages. In that article I mentioned the PSR-4 standard for creating PHP packages. In this tutorial I’m going to walk you through setting up the structure of a PHP package. By having an agreed upon structure for PHP packages we make our code a lot more interchangeable and reusable for the greater Open Source community.

He starts with the basics, creating a simple "nacho" directory in a git repository and introducing Composer (and the composer.json) briefly. He also talks about the "dotfiles" that are included with the use of Composer including a sample Travis-CI configuration. He then gets into the code and shows how to use namespaces, relate them to the directory names for autoloading and even writing a simple test or two. From there he talks about documentation and, finally, pushing the package up to GitHub and adding it to Packagist for others to download.

tagged: psr4 package composer packagist autoload tutorial beginner

Link: http://culttt.com/2014/05/07/create-psr-4-php-package/

Dayle Rees:
PHP: The Composer Lock File
Aug 24, 2015 @ 09:17:10

Dayle Rees has a post to his site help to demystify the composer.lock file for the Composer users out there - what it's for, how it works and why you may or may not want to have it in version control.

Everywhere that I go, conference, the supermarket, the dentist, building sites, people always ask me about the Composer lock file. It's a mystery that seems to cause confusion all across the globe. Well, boys and girls, I'm here today to de-mystify the lock file once and for all.

He starts with a new project and some simple dependencies (three of them), two with specific versions defined and one with a wildcard. Once a composer install is run, the packages are downloaded and the composer.lock file is created. He talks about the contents of the lock file and how they relate to the version of the library Composer has installed, the exact version to be precise. He then gets to the question many wonder about the lock file - should I commit it to my version control system? He suggests that, if you need exact versions installed, then yes. This helps keep versions the same across the board of a team and ensures other people working with the library are using compatible library versions. He ends the post talking about how to use the lock file (install vs update) and what changes could be made in one versus the other.

tagged: composer lock file composerlock indepth update install tutorial

Link: http://daylerees.com/the-composer-lock-file/

Andrew Embler:
Q&A: Using Composer in a concrete5 Package
Aug 21, 2015 @ 11:30:46

Andrew Embler has posted a guide to his site showing you how to use Composer with concrete5 to integrate third party libraries quickly and easily. concrete5 is an open source content management system under the MIT license and is flexible and easy to extend.

Let's say I'm creating a statistics package and I want to use LavaCharts in it. For those who don't know, LavaCharts is a PHP library that abstracts Google's JavaScript Chart API to PHP. Instead of writing JavaScript, you build your charts with object-oriented PHP. It's nice. LavaCharts is available through Composer, so I'll include it that way.

He uses this particular package as an example, showing you how to create the composer.json file to include the LavaCharts library and run Composer to install it. He then shows the integration of the package with the concrete5 CMS instance, including the Composer autoloader in the "on start" handling. From there it's just a matter of referencing the library via its namespace and using it to populate and generate the resulting chart.

tagged: composer lavacharts tutorial integration library package concrete5 cms

Link: http://andrewembler.com/2015/08/q-using-composer-concrete5-package/

Eric Barnes:
How to set up your Mac for local PHP Development
Aug 05, 2015 @ 10:48:14

Eric Barnes has posted a guide to helping you set up (as he sees it) a good PHP development environment on your Mac that includes Homebrew for package management, Composer, Vagrant and the Laravel Homestead VM for project hosting.

This past weekend I decided it was finally time to wipe my Macbook’s hard drive and start fresh. I have used it daily for several years now and still had artifacts from when I used Mamp. Since then Vagrant has turned to my local server of choice and one of the reasons is how clean you can keep your machine by utilizing it.

After finishing the new Mac OS X install it felt like a new beginning. So clean, so minimal. [...] This go around I wanted to keep it as minimal as possible and only install things I know I need and use. This tutorial covers how I set up my Mac for local PHP Development.

His list of software includes the previously mentioned four as well as the ZSH shell replacing the default bash and, obviously, PHP itself installed via Homebrew.

tagged: osx mac local development homestead composer zsh vagrant homebrew

Link: http://ericlbarnes.com/set-mac-local-php-development/

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
Composer cache on Travis
Jul 29, 2015 @ 08:46:52

Cees-Jan Kiewiet has posted an article covering the cache directive on The popular Travis-CI continuous integration service and how it can have an effect on your builds.

Ever since the Test lowest, current, and highest possible on Travis post I wanted to dive into caching composers cache and vendor on Travis. My experiments started the day after that post.

He starts with an example of a simple .travis.yml build configuration that includes the cache directive, showing the caching of entire directories. He points out that, while this can speed up builds, it also comes with a few problems - one being that cache inconsistencies could cause unintended side effects when major changes are made. He points out that most of these risks are worth the gain, though. He's seen a gain of around 40 seconds for a normally 50 second job.

tagged: composer travisci cache configuration caveats

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/07/composer-cache-on-travis/

Three Devs & A Maybe:
Episode 70 - Composer, Monolog and Symfony2 with Jordi Boggiano
Jul 06, 2015 @ 08:37:24

The Three Devs & A Maybe podcast has posted a new episode (#70) featuring Composer and Jordi Boggiano, the creator and lead developer on the project.

This week we are joined by Jordi Boggiano, Composer (Dependency Manager for PHP) lead and Symfony2 core developer. We begin discussion with how he got into software development, touching on his involvement with Symfony2 before its official release. This topic leads us on to chat about why Composer was developed and how much it has grown in popularity. Jordi then discusses some of the changes he would make if he had the chance, along with what the Toran Proxy is. Finally, we discuss Composer performance and the popular Monolog package that he has developed.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 of the show. If you enjoy the episode, be sure to subscribe to their feed or follow them on Twitter to get the info on the latest episodes as they're released.

tagged: threedevsandamaybe podcast ep70 jordiboggiano composer monolog symfony2

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/composer-monolog-and-symfony2-with-jordi-boggiano/

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
Test lowest, current, and highest possible on Travis
Jul 01, 2015 @ 10:57:50

In a new post to his site Cees-Jan Kiewiet talking about "highest" and "lowest" versions of Composer-installed libraries and testing them in Travis-CI builds.

During DPC I've had a talk with Rafael about making sure you test all your possible versions, lowest, current, and highest. The talk was ignited by the infamous composer.lock file (whether to commit it or not).

He goes on to show how you can set up a multiple-version build with the help of the "dependencies" environment variable in your ".travis.yml" configuration file. These are then used in "before_script" commands that tell the Composer install which versions to load. He includes a screenshot of the resulting build and ends with a reminder from Jordi Boggiano (lead developer of Composer) about the resources a build like this takes up and not to do it very often.

tagged: lowest highest library version composer install travisci build

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/06/test-lowest-current-and-highest-possible-on-travis/