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Delicious Brains:
Announcing serializededitor.com: A Visual Editor for PHP Serialized Data
Jun 28, 2017 @ 09:22:23

On the Delicious Brains site there's a new post from Gilbert Pellegram announcing serializededitor.com, an editor specifically designed to help visually edit serialized PHP data.

I recently built a command line daemon in PHP to emulate AWS SQSD for the purposes of testing in Mergebot. As it turns out, one of the benefits of building a large, complex product like Mergebot is that there are pieces of the system that we need to build for the project that might be of use to other developers.

Today, we’re launching that system piece, a free online visual editor for PHP serialized data as serializededitor.com.

In this article, I’ll explain how and why we built this “side” project and how I overcame some of the challenges I faced when building this project.

He starts off with the problem they were trying to solve when creating the editor, mostly centered around determining the differences between two pieces of serialized data. They found something similar to what they were wanting but it didn't provide the "easy editiing" functionality they wanted. He then goes through some of the issues they bumped up against along the way: working with the data and PHP's unserialize, the creation of their own parser, the work to create the Vue.js frontend and re-serializing the data once complete.

They've also open sourced the project over on GitHub so you can clone it locally and contribute back.

tagged: serialized data editor project introduction github vuejs

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/announcing-serializededitor-com-visual-editor-php-serialized-data/

Sam Greenwood:
Event Sourcing for the Rest of Us
Jun 27, 2017 @ 12:15:20

In this recent post to his site Sam Greenwood gives a high level overview of functionality that's becoming more popular and widely used - event sourcing. His post is a guide to event sourcing "for the rest of us" that aren't familiar with it but want to get an understanding of what it's all about.

Event sourcing can be described as storing the events that happened in your system in the order they happened, in some kind of store. These events are then replayed to recreate state in your system, rather than just having a single row in a table, using event sourcing, you have a full history of actions that happened in your system, and how your state got to the given point that it is in.

He uses a single entity in his illustration, showing how the changes would be put into an EventStore repository (possibly stored in something like this). He then sets up his event system for "members" and shows how to apply the different associated events. This is then sent to the repository for handling and saving to whatever data source you have defined.

tagged: eventsourcing introduction tutorial member event example

Link: https://www.samgreenwood.me/event-sourcing-for-the-rest-of-us/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
There’s a Gender Extension for PHP
Jun 26, 2017 @ 13:58:25

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new post from editor Bruno Skvorc sharing information about a "gender" extension for PHP that tries to guess the gender of a first name.

Recently, I ventured into a section of the PHP manual which lists extensions that are used to help with Human Language and Character Encoding. I had never looked at them as a whole – while dealing with gettext, for example, I always kind of landed directly on it and ignored the rest. Well, of those others, there’s one that caught my eye – especially in this day and age given the various controversies – the Gender extension.

This extension, in short, tries to guess the gender of first names. As its introduction says: "Gender PHP extension is a port of the gender.c program originally written by Joerg Michael. The main purpose is to find out the gender of firstnames. The current database contains >40000 firstnames from 54 countries."

This is interesting beyond the fact that the author is kinda called George Michael. In fact, there are many aspects of this extension that are quite baffling.

He then walks through some examples of putting the extension to use, evaluating various names in different languages and gauging the results. The extension allows for definite answers (is male/female), relative results, unisex, a "couple" or, when all else fails, erroring or giving a "not found" result. It also can check for "nicknames" for common names. He walks you through getting it installed and shows other functionality for getting similar names and checking for nicknames, showing code examples and the resulting output.

tagged: gender extension language tutorial introduction install example

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/theres-a-gender-extension-for-php/

Zend Framework:
Convert objects to arrays and back with zend-hydrator
Jun 21, 2017 @ 11:32:01

The Zend Framework blog has posted another in their series of component spotlights, focusing in on a single component of the framework and its use. In this latest article they cover the zend-hydrator component, useful for converting objects to arrays and back.

APIs are all the rage these days, and a tremendous number of them are being written in PHP. When APIs were first gaining popularity, this seemed like a match made in heaven: query the database, pass the results to json_encode(), and voilà! API payload! In reverse, it's json_decode(), pass the data to the database, and done!

Modern day professional PHP, however, is skewing towards usage of value objects and entities, but we're still creating APIs. [...] Zend Framework's answer to that question is zend-hydrator. Hydrators can extract an associative array of data from an object, and hydrate an object from an associative array of data.

They start with the command to get the zend-hydrator package installed (and a dependency they'll need for their examples, zend-filter). A code example is included that shows how to convert a "book" object to an array using the ReflectionHydrator. Next is an example of switching it back, changing the array of data back into a book object. Next comes the integration with zend-filter, showing how to filter values out of objects/arrays you might not want in the end result by adding the filter to the hydrator. Also included are examples of modifying data (strategies), filtering on property names, delegation of the translation based on object type and a few other features included in the component that could be helpful.

tagged: zendframework component zendhydrator tutorial introduction filter translate

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-06-21-zend-hydrator.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Validate input using zend-validator
Jun 14, 2017 @ 11:25:36

The Zend Framework blog has continued their series spotlighting various components of the framework with their latest installment. In this latest tutorial they cover the zend-validator component used to validate data against a set of rules for correctness.

In our previous post, we covered zend-filter, The filters in zend-filter are generally used to pre-filter or normalize incoming data. This is all well and good, but we still don't know if the data is valid. That's where zend-validator comes in.

The post starts with showing how to get the component installed via Composer and the optional dependency of the zend-service-manager component (to handle the use of ValidatorChain functionality). Code is included showing the interface the validators all conform to and an example of the validator in use. It then covers some of the built-in validation options and how to build up a validator "chain" of multiple checks. It also shows how to break the validation if one fails, setting priority (order of execution), evaluating values in certain contexts and registering your own custom validators.

tagged: zendvalidator zendframework validation tutorial introduction component series

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-06-13-zend-validator.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Filter input using zend-filter
Jun 09, 2017 @ 10:58:19

The Zend Framework blog has posted a new tutorial covering a single component of the framework. In this latest article ZF lead developer Matthew Weier O'Phinney covers the zend-filter component for filtering input from your users.

When securing your website, the mantra is "Filter input, escape output." We previously covered escaping output with our post on zend-escaper. We're now going to turn to filtering input.

Filtering input is rather complex and spans a number of practices: filtering/normalizing input [and] validating input. For now, we're going to look at the first item, filtering and normalizing input, using the component zend-filter.

He shows you how to get the component installed, via Composer, and talks about some of the dependencies it needs, optional and required. Since they'll be using the "FilterChain" functionality, he also requires that. He moves into the code, showing the interface required for a validator to work (basically just defining a "filter" method). He talks about some of the common filtered included and how to refactor custom validation handling into a FilterChain performing the same operations. He ends with another example of reading from a file and how to use it on an array of values, each line as a string from the file.

tagged: zendframework component tutorial introduction zendfilter input

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-06-08-zend-filter.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Re-Introducing Symfony Console – CLI PHP for the Uninitiated!
May 25, 2017 @ 11:38:02

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from author Claudio Ribeiro that wants to re-introduce you to the Symfony Console package, a component of the larger Symfony framework that makes it easier to create and work with command-line PHP scripts.

As software developers, we often feel the need to resort to command line tools. These kinds of tools are helpful when we need to do a sort of recurring task like migrating data, performing imports, or creating cron jobs.

The Symfony Console component tool provides us with a simple framework to create our own command line tools. Unlike many components in Symfony, this is a standalone package and is used by the likes of Laravel‘s Artisan and many other famous PHP packages.

The tutorial then walks you through the installation process, via Composer, and the creation of a new command. With this simple base created, he then adds in actual functionality, building out a command to hash and verify a password string. They show how to use the command and an example of its output. Next up, he creates another command example, this time verifying the password hash provided as an argument. The tutorial wraps up with a look at testing your console comamnds with PHPUnit tests via the included CommandTester functionality.

tagged: symfony console commandline cli package component tutorial introduction

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/re-introducing-symfony-console-cli-php-uninitiated/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Re-Introducing Composer – the Cornerstone of Modern PHP Apps
May 22, 2017 @ 11:54:48

If you've been developing any kind of PHP applications lately, chances are you've at least heard of Composer. This package manager has dramatically changed the way we develop in PHP but there are still some out there wondering what all the fuss is about. In this tutorial from SitePoint author Claudio Ribeiro (re-)introduces this powerful tool and provides some basics of its use.

In this article, we will tackle the basics of Composer, and what makes it such a powerful and useful tool.

Before we go into detail, there are two things that we need to have in mind: what Composer is [and] what Composer is not. [...] Essentially, Composer allows you to declare and manage every dependency of your PHP projects.

He then walks you through the installation of the tool, running it either globally or locally (per-project). He lists out some of the basic commands, what they're for and helps you on your way to installing your first package: PHPUnit. He also covers the special "vendor" folder Composer creates, how autoloading works, various configuration values and installing packages globally rather than just locally. He then talks about the other side of the PHP package ecosystem: Packagist including how to submit packages and set up your own package's composer.json so it can be pulled in correctly.

tagged: composer introduction basics tutorial package packagist

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/re-introducing-composer/

Dotkernel.com:
What is PSR-7 and How to Use It
May 22, 2017 @ 10:18:50

On of the standards that have come out of the PHP-FIG (PHP Framework Interoperability Group) in the past few years has been PSR-7, a standards definition for working with HTTP requests and responses as PHP objects. While those that have worked with most of the PHP frameworks out there may be familiar with the concept, it can be confusing if you're just getting started with the idea. In this post on the Dotkernel site they introduce PSR-7, talking about its goals and what it defines to help bring everyone on the same page for HTTP requests.

PSR-7 is a set of common interfaces defined by PHP Framework Interop Group. These interfaces are representing HTTP messages, and URIs for use when communicating trough HTTP.

Any web application using this set of interfaces is a PSR-7 application.

They start off by defining (and linking to) the different interfaces involved in the PSR-7 specification (the spec doesn't define functionality, only the structure). From there the tutorial uses the Zend Diactoros component to illustrate an implementation of the PSR-7 structure. They cover two of the main tasks when working with HTTP requests/responses: working with the headers and fetching/writing to the body.

tagged: psr7 phpfig standard http request response introduction

Link: https://www.dotkernel.com/dotkernel3/what-is-psr-7-and-how-to-use-it/

TutsPlus.com:
What Is WP-CLI? A Beginner’s Guide
May 18, 2017 @ 10:35:31

The TutsPlus.com site has posted a new tutorial introducing you to the WordPress command line tool, the WP-CLI.

WP-CLI has been around for quite some time now (circa 2011) and has steadily gained momentum in the WordPress developer community. But what is it exactly, and how can you use it in your WordPress workflow?

The idea behind WP-CLI is that it allows you to interact with, and manage, WordPress sites via a command line interface. According to the official documentation, it's a command line alternative to using the traditional WordPress admin user interface.

They starts by explaining some of what the tool can do and help you get it installed either manually (on Mac or Windows) or more automatically for the DesktopServer users out there. The tutorial then goes through the basics of using the wp command line tool including getting a listing of current settings, showing the version installed and getting a list of currently installed plugins and themes. It also shows how to install new plugins, list posts, pages and comments currently in the system. The post ends with some additional resources where you can get more information about the WP-CLI tool and its features.

tagged: wordpress wpcli tool commandline introduction tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/what-is-wp-cli-a-beginners-guide--cms-28649