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SitePoint Web Blog:
Heroku Alternative: Deploy Apps with Dokku on DigitalOcean
Jun 29, 2016 @ 10:28:54

On the SitePoint Web blog there's a new tutorial showing you how to deploy applications with Dokku on DigitalOcean in the same way that you might with Heroku.

When Heroku announced their (quite reasonable) new limits for free apps, I realized that I would have to find another source of hosting for all the small, low-traffic projects that I currently have running on Heroku. [...] Since I have such an unreasonable number of apps running on Heroku, I thought it was high time to try out Dokku. Dokku is a Heroku-like tool that allows you to deploy complex apps by simply pushing with Git.

They start with some of the differences between the Heroku setup and Dokku, mostly that Dokku uses Docker for the deployment and configuration. They then show you how to create a Dokku server on DigitalOcean: setting up the domain, making the application and deploying the app with a push and other datastore plugins.

tagged: heroku dokku digitalocean deploy application tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/heroku-alternative-deploy-apps-dokku-digitalocean/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!
Jun 28, 2016 @ 12:13:15

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted a new tutorial looking at the combination of Symfony applications (well, one specific one) and Vagrant to optimize it for the best performance possible.

In this short tutorial, we’ll set up Sulu, a new Symfony based CMS, and optimize it on a Vagrant environment. Why a dedicated tutorial handling this? Besides the fact that Sulu has a rather complex initialization procedure, it is based on Symfony which is infamously slow on virtual machines with shared filesystems, and thus needs additional optimizations post-install. The performance hacks in this post, while Sulu-specific, can be applied to any Symfony application to make it faster on Vagrant.

The rest of the post walks you through the steps to get the box set up and the Sulu application up and running:

  • New Box and Folder Sharing
  • App Type and Vagrant Boot (configuration)
  • Installing Sulu

Then they get into the speed improvements and "hacks" to make the overall system perform better. They make updates to the log/cache directory fetching, moving the "vendors" folder into the VM (non-synced) and enabling the APC caching on autoloading. The tutorial also includes a few helpful troubleshooting tips of things to check if a problem does happen to pop up.

tagged: tutorial symfony application vagrant sulucms performance

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/symfony-on-vagrant-performance-hacks-sulucms-case-study/

TutsPlus.com:
Internationalizing WordPress Projects: The Introduction
Jun 28, 2016 @ 10:38:01

The TutsPlus.com site has kicked off a new set of posts today with he first part of their series covering internationalization in WordPress applications.

A few years ago, I wrote about the process of internationalizing WordPress-based projects. Though I think there are some times when tutorials don't necessarily need updating, refreshing, or revisiting, there are other times in which we can all benefit from revisiting the topic.

After all, software changes from year to year, and we also gain experience as we continue to work with a given piece of software. WordPress is no different.

They'll be covering what internationalization is, how it works within WordPress, the difference between internationalization and localization and more. In this first part of the series, though, they briefly cover some of the functions and functionality you might see as a part of WordPress already to make internationalization possible.

tagged: internationalization wordpress tutorial series part1 introduction

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/internationalizing-wordpress-projects-the-introduction--cms-26636

Stoimen Popov:
PHP: Don’t Call the Destructor Explicitly
Jun 27, 2016 @ 12:52:39

In a new post to his site Stoimen Popov makes the recommendation to not call the destructor explicitly in your code and provides some alternatives.

PHP 5 introduces a destructor concept similar to that of other object-oriented languages, such as C++” says the documentation for destructors. [...] Well, as you can not call the constructor explicitly [...] so we should not call the destructor explicitly. The problem is that I’ve seen this many times, but it’s a pity that this won’t destroy the object and it is still a valid PHP code.

He talks about __destruct and it's role in PHP's set of "magic methods" and what they exist to do. He then gets into a few examples of what code could look like that uses a destructor and the difference between normal handling calling the destructor explicitly. The main differences is that calling it explicitly does not destroy the object, it's basically like calling any other method. He does include an interesting method for destroying the object - setting it to null - and notes that the destructor fires then too. He also points out a few interesting things about cloning objects and how object references work when setting nulls as in the previous example.

tagged: destructor explicit call object destroy null tutorial

Link: http://www.stoimen.com/blog/2011/11/14/php-dont-call-the-destructor-explicitly/

Alejandro Celaya:
Dispatch REST-like requests with a single controller class in Zend Expressive
Jun 27, 2016 @ 10:21:25

In a new post to his site Alejandro Celaya shows you how to dispatch REST-like requests in Zend Expressive using a single-controller method.

I was digging into Zend Expressive and how to use controllers that allow me to share dependencies between different routes, instead of having to use different middlewares every time. Abdul wrote a great article on this subject that you can find here, which also became part of Expressive's cookbook some time later.

This is a perfect approach that easily allows to reuse some code, but then I thought how to do something similar in a rest environment, having a single class with different dispatchable methods that will be called depending on the request's HTTP method. This is a possible solution based on ZF2's AbstractRestfulController.

He starts by creating an AbstractRestController class to handle the basics of the REST handling, essentially matching verbs to their actions. He then extends this with a RestUserController class that overrides the necessary methods for only the HTTP verbs you want to change. He then shows how to register the route so it can be used by any request verb type (GET, POST, PUT, etc).

tagged: zendexpressive tutorial rest request verb http zendframework2 abstractcontroller

Link: http://blog.alejandrocelaya.com/2016/06/24/dispatch-rest-like-requests-with-a-single-controller-class-in-zend-expressive/

Richard Bagshaw:
Prophecy
Jun 24, 2016 @ 09:11:01

Richard Bagshaw has a post to his site sharing some of his experience with the Prophecy testing tool and how it compares to Mockery for creating test doubles (mocks and stubs).

For a while now I have been using Mockery as my test double framework of choice, however recently I have been taking a look at Prophecy as an alternative.

[...] "Prophecy is a highly opinionated yet very powerful and flexible PHP object mocking framework. Though initially it was created to fulfil phpspec2 needs, it is flexible enough to be used inside any testing framework out there with minimal effort."

He then gets into some basic usage of the tool - creating a basic mock, assigning expectations and behaviors and performing the test. He steps through each line of the example explaining what's happening and what can be expected as a result. He ends the post with some final thoughts comparing Prophecy to the normal PHPUnit mocking tools and points out several other features it makes easier to work with as well.

tagged: prophecy unittest doubles mock stub example introduction tutorial

Link: http://www.richardbagshaw.co.uk/prophecy/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Using Halite for Privacy and Two-Way Encryption of Emails
Jun 23, 2016 @ 11:18:17

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted showing you how to use the Halite package to encrypt the contents of emails. The Halite library sits on top of the libsodium functionality to provide tested, hardened cryptographic results.

Cryptography is a complex matter. In fact, there is one golden rule: "Don’t implement cryptography yourself." The reason for this is that so many things can go wrong while implementing it, the slightest error can generate a vulnerability and if you look away, your precious data can be read by someone else.

[...] Some libraries out there implement cryptography primitives and operations, and leave a lot of decisions to the developer. [...] Nevertheless, there is one library that stands out from the rest for its simplicity and takes a lot of responsibility from the developer on the best practices, in addition to using the libsodium library. In this article we are going to explore Halite.

The tutorial then starts of helping you get the libsodium package installed on your system (assuming it's unix-based). They then start on the sample application - a basic "email" client able to send/receive messages between users. They set up RESTful endpoints to get the messages, use the Doctrine ORM for a database interface and show the use of the Halite Crypto class to encrypt/decrypt the message contents.

tagged: halite privacy twoway encryption email message tutorial libsodium

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/using-halite-for-privacy-and-two-way-encryption-of-emails/

Torben Köhn:
PHP Generators – A Guide and Tutorial
Jun 22, 2016 @ 13:45:44

For those that may have heard about generators but aren't too familiar with them or what they do, Torben Köhn has posted a great introduction to them and their functionality.

In my in-depth guide about iterators I talked about what iterators are exactly and how you can use them. At the end I told you that I’ll also write one for generators. Here it is.

First off, if you don’t know what an iterator is and you’d not be able to explain to someone else what it is, you will not have much fun with this because you won’t exactly recognize the use-cases. I suggest you read my iterator-guide first. After this, don’t get scared off by some confusing words used here, I’ll try to clarify every single one.

He breaks up the rest of the post into different sections, each walking you through different aspects of generators:

  • What is a generator?
  • The yield-keyword
  • Iterating a generator
  • Yielding keys
  • Yielding in a loop
  • An infinite generator

He wraps up the post sharing some real use-cases for generators to help you understand them with a bit more practical application (including stacking them, file system handling and co-routines).

tagged: generators tutorial introduction guide beginner

Link: http://tk.talesoft.io/2016/06/06/php-generators-a-guide-and-tutorial/

Sherif Ramadan:
Bloom Filters in PHP
Jun 22, 2016 @ 10:56:26

On his site Sherif Ramadan has posted an interesting tutorial covering implementing bloom filters in PHP. Bloom filters are data structures that make it easier to determine if something is a member of a set.

Let's imagine you have built a music app like Spotify. You've finally grown this thing to sizeable amount of users and you have a decent number of titles in your content library. Let's also say this app has social elements to it so your users can connect with their facebook friends or twitter followers. Now, let's say each time your users play a song in your app you want to ask the question Which of this user's friends have NOT listened to this song yet? The intention being that you may recommend that song to them if they haven't listened to it.

One solution to this problem is to use a data structure known as a bloom filter. A bloom filter is basically a very space-efficient hash set with probabilistic tendency. If you aren't familiar with a hash set or sets in general, let's do a quick review of what they mean.

He goes on to explain what a bloom filter is and how it differs from normal sets, hash sets and hash maps. He then introduces some of the basic concepts involved in creating and using bloom filters. To help make things clearer, he provides a "contrived example" using lightbulbs and the probably that they've been turned on. From there he starts to get into something more practical, something more in the world of PHP. He includes a basic Bloomfilter class example and some of the results (performance) of using it over something like in_array (especially for large data sets).

tagged: bloom filter example tutorial introduction probability set

Link: http://phpden.info/Bloom-filters-in-PHP

NetTuts.com:
Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using the WordPress Rules
Jun 21, 2016 @ 13:21:45

The TutsPlus.com site continues their series covering the use of the PHP_CodeSniffer tool with WordPress in this latest post. In this new tutorial they show you how to install and use the WordPress-specific coding "sniffs".

If you're just joining the series, we've been discussing the topic of code smells, how to refactor them, and tools that are available to help us automate some of the monotony that comes with doing so, especially within PHP programming.

[...] If you've made it this far, I assume you're a WordPress developer, and you're interested in getting PHP CodeSniffer configured such that it can sniff out any problems in your code as it relates to the WordPress Coding Standards. That's good! Because in the remainder of this article, that's exactly what we're going to cover.

The tutorial helps you install the WordPress sniffs and how to add them to the standards supported by your local phpcs installation. The command to execute them against your WordPress plugin is included as well as example output and how to refactor those issues away.

tagged: phpcodesniffer smells tutorial wordpress install setup

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-php-codesniffer-with-wordpress-installing-and-using-the-wordpress-rules--cms-26443