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SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Read Big Files with PHP (Without Killing Your Server)
Nov 21, 2017 @ 13:19:27

On the SitePoint PHP blog, there's a tutorial posted showing you how to deal with large files without "killing your server". In this case, it's not about the upload process but about the handling of large files on the server side.

It’s not often that we, as PHP developers, need to worry about memory management. The PHP engine does a stellar job of cleaning up after us, and the web server model of short-lived execution contexts means even the sloppiest code has no long-lasting effects.

There are rare times when we may need to step outside of this comfortable boundary — like when we’re trying to run Composer for a large project on the smallest VPS we can create, or when we need to read large files on an equally small server. It’s the latter problem we’ll look at in this tutorial.

They start off by describing how they plan to measure the success of the improved file handling, mostly around the memory usage required to work with the file. It then gets into some of the options available including:

  • reading files line by line
  • piping between files
  • using filters

The last option, the filters, seems to be the best one. He uses this one and customizes the handling with different configurations and custom protocols. All related code is included in the post and is avaialble on GitHub.

tagged: read big file memory consumption filter stream tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/performant-reading-big-files-php/

Laravel News:
Using Named Routes in a Lumen Test
Nov 21, 2017 @ 12:56:49

On the Laravel News site there's a quick tutorial posted showing you how to use named routes in Lumen in writing tests for your application.

When writing tests in Lumen, I recently discovered that the route() helper doesn’t work with tests out-of-the-box.

I prefer to define named routes and make requests against them in my tests. If you follow the Lumen documentation, the typical way that you make a request for a test [of the return of a JSON endpoint results in an error message]. [...] If you inspect things a little closer, you can see the issue: [...] Interestingly, the route doesn’t look quite right, and the router is returning the / route. It looks like the localhost part of the request isn’t being set, and the route isn’t matching. We can fix that by bootstrapping the request as Laravel does.

The post then walks you through the manual process of bootstrapping things so that routes are correctly resolved. This includes changes to the code for the base test case to handle the "boot" and set the path value for the request correctly.

tagged: named lumen route test request boot base testing tutorial

Link: https://laravel-news.com/using-named-routes-lumen-test

Sergey Zhuk:
Building ReactPHP Memcached Client: Unit-Testing Promises
Nov 21, 2017 @ 11:43:32

Sergey Zhuk has posted the latest part of his "Building a ReactPHP Memcache client" series to his site today. In this latest article, part four of the series, he focuses on unit testing the client as he's developed it so far.

This is the last article from the series about building from scratch a streaming Memcached PHP client for ReactPHP ecosystem. The library is already released and published, you can find it on GitHub. In the previous article, we have completely finished with the source code for async Memcached ReactPHP client. And now it’s time to start testing it.

He then walks through some of the steps to create the tests for the client, made a little more difficult by its asynchronous handling. He shows how to use Mockery to create tests that evaluate the results of the promises from the client, starting with a simple check on the return of a version call. The post goes on to show testing for other parts of the client and includes all of the code and commands you'll need to execute them in your own environment.

tagged: reactphp memcached client asynchronous tutorial series part4

Link: http://sergeyzhuk.me/2017/11/20/memcached-reactphp-p4/

TutsPlus.com:
Gates and Policies in Laravel
Nov 20, 2017 @ 12:46:28

On the TutsPlus.com site there's a new tutorial posted for the Laravel users out there covering a few pieces of the authorization features of the framework. The tutorial covers "gates" and "policies", introducing some of their basic concepts and providing example code to implement your own.

Today, we're going to discuss the authorization system of the Laravel web framework. The Laravel framework implements authorization in the form of gates and policies. After an introduction to gates and policies, I'll demonstrate the concepts by implementing a custom example.

I assume that you're already aware of the built-in Laravel authentication system as that's something essential in order to understand the concept of authorization. Obviously, the authorization system works in conjunction with the authentication system in order to identify the legitimate user session.

The article starts by introducing some of the basic approaches the framework takes to authorization handling and where gates and polices fit in. It then gets into the details of each including example code showing how to define them based on the interfaces provided. The tutorial then shows how to put them to use in a simple application, applying them at both the controller and view level.

tagged: laravel tutorial gate policy authorization custom introduction

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/gates-and-policies-in-laravel--cms-29780

Master Zend Framework:
What Does It Take To Start Using Zend Expressive?
Nov 20, 2017 @ 11:23:17

On the Master Zend Framework site Matthew Setter has posted a new tutorial showing you what it takes to get started using Zend Expressive. The article is more about the environment the framework would live in (well, the application written with it) than the actual framework itself.

Ever thought that it's hard to get started with Zend Expressive? Ever think you need to know Vagrant, Ansible, Docker, Puppet, Linux, and more? Nope, you don't! In this post, I'm going to show you that, while these tools can help, if you’re just getting started with the framework (such as learning about it), you don't need them.

I want to be clear, before we go any further, that I’m not talking about doing fully-fledged development. [...] So what I’m talking about here is when you’re just starting out and getting a feel for Zend Expressive, right up to building a test application. I’m not talking about a fully-fledged, deployed application that requires copious tests, one backed by a CI/CD pipeline.

He then talks a bit about the history of Zend Framework and how one of Expressive's goals it to help take some of the sting out of using it. Following this he covers some of the possible tooling you could use including two environment tools: Docker (useful but not required) and Vagrant (handy but also not a must). Finally he gets to the actual requirement - a version of PHP 7 installed on the system. He shows how it, along with its included web server, can be used in development to host an Expressive site by itself.

tagged: zendexpressive zendframework tool environment tutorial docker vagrant

Link: https://www.masterzendframework.com/what-does-it-take-to-get-started-with-zend-expressive/

Mark Baker:
Extending final Classes and Methods by manipulating the AST
Nov 20, 2017 @ 10:38:32

Mark Baker has an interesting post to his site where he shares a suggestion for making it easier to create unit tests for some of the more difficult parts of your unit tests. In the article he shows how to extend final classes and methods by manipulating the AST (abstract syntax tree structure) of the current code under test.

We know that we should always write unit tests for our code, and mock dependencies; but that isn’t always easy when we need to mock classes define as final, or that contain final methods. This isn’t normally a problem when we’re only working with classes within our own libraries and applications, because we control whether they are final or not, and we can type-hint these dependencies to interfaces. However, when the dependencies that we use are from external libraries, we lose that control; and it can become harder to test our own classes if we do need to mock final classes and they haven’t been built to interfaces.

He talks about how one tool, Mockery, allows some of this with its functionality but can still cause issues when mocks are passed instead of actual class instances. He then starts on a solution he has been trying to implement - a mocking library that makes use of the PHP_Parser package to make it possible to modify the structure of the code itself, not just put a wrapper (mock) around it. He includes a bit of code showing how to use that and the BetterReflection library to do some class introspection, locate files for testing and how to the tool to "de-finalize" a class (make it no longer "final").

tagged: extend class method manipulate ast testing unittest final mockery tutorial

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/11/19/extending-final-classes-and-methods-by-manipulating-the-ast/

Alison Gianotto:
So You Ran Composer as Root...
Nov 15, 2017 @ 10:50:09

Alison Gianotto has an article posted to her since basically answering the "now what?" question resulting from you running Composer as root on your system.

Composer is a PHP dependency manager that’s used in just about any modern PHP application, and it works similarly to how Bundler works for Ruby.

Even though Composer itself gives you a warning about not running it as root, lots of people disregard this warning and run it as root anyway. We run into this issue a lot on my open source asset management project, Snipe-IT, so I figured I’d write up how to fix this if you inadvertently (or advertently) ran composer as root.

She starts by describing the difference between "installing Composer as root" and "running the Composer install as root" (two very different things). She points out that, while Composer tries to prevent the second but permissions errors sometimes cause people to move forward as root anyway, despite the warning. She then shows how to fix the permissions issues so it can be run as a normal user, updating the files in .composer for the root account and re-running the install.

tagged: composer root permission fix tutorial cache

Link: https://snipe.net/2017/11/15/so-you-ran-composer-as-root/

Rob Allen:
Implementing CORS in Zend Expressive
Nov 15, 2017 @ 09:20:13

In a new post to his site Rob Allen shows you how to implement CORS in a Zend Expressive application through the use of a simple middleware wrapper that sends the appropriate headers.

On a recent project, I needed to implement CORS support for my Expressive API. The easiest way to do this is to use Mike Tuupola's PSR-7 CORS Middleware.

As this is a standard Slim-Style PSR-7 middleware implementation, we need to wrap it for Expressive, so we make a factory. [...] We then register this in our AppConfigProvider::getDependencies() by adding to the factories key.

He includes the code and configuration changes required to make it all work and includes example output of a request (with headers) from a curl call to the API. He also includes a section on working with JSON error responses and ProblemDetails for when there are issues related to the current CORS policy definition.

tagged: cors tutorial zendexpressive middleware json error problemdetails

Link: https://akrabat.com/implementing-tuupola-cors-in-expressive/

Symfony Finland:
Attaching React.js to a template rendered on the server with Twig
Nov 13, 2017 @ 09:27:49

On the Symfony Finland blog there's a new tutorial posted sharing the results of their effort to get React.js to play nice with Twig, a popular PHP templating library, via a server-side generated template.

React.js is a JavaScript view library that allows developers to create interfaces is a structured way based on a hierarchical component structure. React can either create the DOM structure from scratch, or attach to an existing one rendered by the server to speed up the first load.

If you create Twig templates that match the React rendering, you can take advantage of this feature without a complicated rendering setup.

While there were other methods created to try to solve the problem (rendering the React.js template on the server side) they show a better way via React.js 16 and Twig templates. Code is included showing how to create a simple React application, and how to hook in Twig via a "hydrate" call to pull in the content. React.js has a bit of an issue by default but a little extra work on the Twig side fixes that (see the post for the solution on that one).

tagged: reactjs template render twig serverside inject content tutorial

Link: https://symfony.fi/entry/attaching-react-js-to-a-template-rendered-on-the-server-with-twig

TutsPlus.com:
How to Create a Custom Authentication Guard in Laravel
Nov 10, 2017 @ 11:53:25

In the TutsPlus.com site there's a tutorial posted showing you how to create a custom guard in Laravel by building on top of the current system to integrate it with a MongoDB database.

In this article, we’re going to cover the authentication system in the Laravel framework. The main aim of this article is to create a custom authentication guard by extending the core authentication system.

Laravel provides a very solid authentication system in the core that makes the implementation of basic authentication a breeze. [...] Moreover, the system itself is designed in such a way that you could extend it and plug in your custom authentication adapters as well. That’s what we'll discuss in detail throughout this article.

The article then starts out with a brief description of the two parts of the system: "guards" and "providers". It then provides the list of files that will be involved and where they belong in the overall structure. From there it's on to the configuration changes and code required to make the link to the MongoDB database and the creation of the User model and authentication provider. Next comes the code to create the guard and what's required to tie it all together and make the full system work. The tutorial wraps up with an example of testing this new guard via a simple controller call.

tagged: laravel tutorial guard authentication user framework mongodb

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-create-a-custom-authentication-guard-in-laravel--cms-29667