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Three Devs & A Maybe Podcast:
The Big Five-Zero
November 21, 2014 @ 09:23:30

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast has released their latest episode, #50! In the Big Five-Zero hosts Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann talk about a wide range of topics including web unicorns, application composition and the state of CodeIgniter 3.

This week we celebrate the 50th episode of the podcast in style, by... not even remembering it is the 50th episode till half way through (whoops). We start off discussion with our differing views on working from home, web unicorns and running shoes. Leading on from this, we bring up a couple of news topics that have been making the rounds in the PHP world recently - along with a proposed Unix command-line series that Mick is keen to do. We then move on to some of the great feedback we have received from you guys this past week, and somehow this leads to Edd rambling on about the Unix philosophy/application composition again. Finally, we discuss the state of CodeIgniter 3, how Git works under-the-hood and Objective-C/Swift's memory management model.

Other topics mentioned in this episode include:

You can listen to this latest episode either via the in-page player or by downloading the full mp3. If you enjoy the show, consider subscribing to their feed too.

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threedevsandamaybe podcast ep50 news unix codeigniter3 git objectivec swift

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/the-big-five-zero/

Three Devs & A Maybe Podcast:
I Want You Back
November 10, 2014 @ 09:19:34

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast is back with their latest episode hosted by Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann. In episode #48, "I Want You Back", they talk about a wide range of topics including currency, git and passwords.

Two weeks in the making, we are finally back with another podcast installment. This week we touch upon the Unix philosophy, client drama, and shiny new MacBook Pros. We then move on to discuss the security concerns that have arisen from the introduction of contactless payment systems. Leading on from this we talk about the YubiKey and how it can be used to provide two-factor authentication, for services such as LastPass. Finally, we close with how 'tombstoning' your code trumps the dreaded commenting out every time.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed to get the latest episodes as their released!

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threedevsandamaybe podcast ep48 security yubikey git currency

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/i-want-you-back/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Deploy Your Website Using Laravel and Git
September 08, 2014 @ 09:28:50

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial by James Dow showing you how to use git and Laravel for application deployment. This isn't just about deploying a Laravel application, though. It includes a method for automating processes once the deployment is complete.

You can't be a successful web developer without using some sort of deployment workflow for your websites. It doesn't matter how good or bad your workflow might be. If you can't get your website up to production then your client will never pay you for your hard work. [...] I wanted something that was as easy as pushing a repository with Git. More important, I wanted to be in full control when pushing content live. I was able to find a similar workflow that used Git to handle the file transferring. On top of that I found out I could also use the PHP framework Laravel to automate the more repetitive tasks.

He starts with the server side of things, showing you how to get the git repository created and structured. He then configures Laravel with a "remote" connection for the production server so it can reach out and execute the tasks. Finally he shows how to make the route (/deploy) that's executed when the route is called. In his example route he sets up a SSH request to the production server that changes to the web server root and makes a "git pull" request to get the latest code. It's an interesting use for something like Laravel, but I wonder if it's a good fit for the deployment need. This kind of thing could pretty easily be replaced with a small shell script.

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deployment laravel tutorial git ssh

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/deploy-website-using-laravel-git/

SitePoint Web Blog:
Understanding Version Control with Diffs
May 23, 2014 @ 10:53:30

If you're relatively new to using version control, there may be one technique you've yet to get a grip on. In this new post on SitePoint.com's Web blog they introduce you to using the "diff" functionality to discover differences between versions of code.

Every project is made up of countless little changes. With a little luck, they will finally form a website, an app, or some other product. Your version control system keeps track of these changes. But only once you understand how to read them will you be able to track your project's progress. Using the example of Git, the popular version control system, this article will help you understand these changes.

They include several screenshots and line-by-line descriptions of what each part of the output of the "git diff" command is. There's also a brief description of what each of the sections contains and how to inspect both committed and non-committed changes. There's even a link to a list of other applications that may help provide a clearer picture of the changes rather than just the command line output.

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versioncontrol diff git introduction commit branch

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/understanding-version-control-diffs

Zumba Engineering Blog:
Enforce code standards with composer, git hooks, and phpcs
April 15, 2014 @ 09:13:48

The Zumba Engineering blog has a new post looking at a way you can control code quality and standards with the help of Composer, git hooks and the PHP Code Sniffer (phpcs) tools.

Maintaining code quality on projects where there are many developers contributing is a tough assignment. How many times have you tried to contribute to an open-source project only to find the maintainer rejecting your pull request on the grounds of some invisible coding standard? [...] Luckily there are tools that can assist maintainers. In this post, I'll be going over how to use composer, git hooks, and phpcs to enforce code quality rules.

These three technologies are combined together to make a more seamless experience for the developer while keeping the code quality high. Their method makes use of the "scripts" (post-install-cmd) feature of Composer to, after the installation of all packages, set up a git hook script that will run the phpcs checks on pre-commit. It's a pretty simple shell script that kicks back any errors it might find before the user can commit their changes.

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code standards composer git hook phpcs codesniffer install precommit

Link: http://engineering.zumba.com/2014/04/14/control-code-quality

Lorna Mitchell:
Using Composer Without GitIgnoring Vendor/
March 12, 2014 @ 12:45:23

In her latest post Lorna Mitchell looks at a method, when using Composer and git, to fix an issue around subdirectories that are git repositories and git thinking they should be submodules instead.

Recent additions to the joind.in API have introduced some new dependencies so we decided we'd start using Composer to manage these - but we don't want to run composer unsupervised. I'm sure this will bring the rain of "just run composer install, it's probably mostly almost safe" criticism, but actually it's quite tricky to run Composer without excluding vendor/ from source control so I thought I'd share how we did it so that anyone who wants to do so can learn from my experience!

She starts by describing the usual use of Composer - making the "composer.json", running the install and see the "vendor" directory being added. When she tried to check in the dependencies, git gave her an error about wanting them to be submodules. Instead, she figured out a way to add a line to the .gitignore to have it disregard the "vendor/.git" directory, making it work as expected.

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composer vendor install gitignore git

Link: http://www.lornajane.net/posts/2014/using-composer-without-gitignoring

Kevin van Zonneveld:
It's Almost 2014 and We Are Still Committing Broken Code
December 30, 2013 @ 09:19:28

Kevin van Zonneveld has a new post that, while not PHP specific, does have a handy script that will help you stop committing broken code.

Whatever the reason, it's almost 2014 and we are still committing broken code. This needs to stop because best case: Travis or Jenkins prevent those errors from hitting production and it's frustrating to go back and revert/redo that stuff. A waste of your time and state of mind, you were already working on other things. Worst case: your error goes unnoticed and hits production.

To help resolve the problem, he suggests using the "hook" system common to most version control software. In his specific example, he shows the use of a pre-commit hook that fires off a bash script on the files being committed. He includes the full code for this bash script that includes a check for PHP scripts using the built in PHP linter (the "-l" option on the command line). He also includes the commands and updates you'll need to make to get it installed on git.

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git precommit hook syntax error bash script tutorial

Link: http://kvz.io/blog/2013/12/29/one-git-commit-hook-to-rule-them-all/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Git Hooks for Fun and Profit
September 25, 2013 @ 12:45:21

If you're a git user (you do use git, right?), there's a powerful feature that can help perform some automatic actions in your repositories - git hooks. In this new post to the SitePoint PHP blog, Timothy Boronczyk introduces you to them and how to set them up.

When certain commands are run, Git searches the .git/hooks directory for suitable hook scripts which are then executed if found. You'll find a small set of example scripts there (you can activate them by renaming them to remove the .sample prefix and setting their executable bit), and a complete list of hooks can be found in the githooks(5) man page. This article suggests a handful of hooks which can streamline development and help improve your efficiency.

He gives four different examples of checks based on the state of the commit (like pre-commit or post-commit):

  • Lint Checks
  • Spell-Check Commit Messages
  • Checking Standards
  • Automatically Run Composer

Each comes with the example code needed to implement them and some description about what they're doing.

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git hooks introduction example lint spelling standards composer

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/git-hooks-fun-profit

Zend Framework Blog:
Zend Framework 1 is Migrating to Git!
March 28, 2013 @ 09:29:23

The Zend Framework project has announced a major move for the framework's development - the Zend Framework v1 repositories will be moving from Subversion to Git over the next year or so.

Since its inception, Zend Framework 1 has used Subversion for versioning. However, as we approach its end-of-life (which will occur 12-18 months from the time this post is written), and as our experience with ZF2 processes becomes more familiar, we -- the Zend team and the Community Review team -- feel that we can better support ZF1 via GitHub. As such, we will be migrating the ZF1 Subversion repository to GitHub this week. Please read on for details!

The post details the steps that'll be taken during the process including the changing of the location of the "master" branch (and how to change svn to point to it) and the updates to the integration of the Dojo libraries. They also talk some about the "extras" repository and how things will work with the Issue Tracker and pull requests in the future.

The repository and issues migration is the first step in a series of planned migrations. We also plan to eventually migrate our wiki to GitHub; this will allow us to offload functionality from the main ZF website, and also consolidate all development-related functionality (other than the mailing list) in a central location.
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zendframework1 git migration subversion github


NetTuts.com:
Setting Up A Staging Environment
February 15, 2013 @ 10:49:39

On NetTuts.com today Gabriel Manricks walks you through setting up a staging environment using Vagrant to install and setup a virtual machine running Apache 2 and PHP 5.4.

Creating a staging environment is specific to your production environment. There is no magic solution that works in every situation. But most cases follow a similar pattern, and I'll cover all the key points as we go along. It's fair to assume that most people deploy their apps with some kind of versioning tool (like GIT). [...] Besides GIT, you have to think about the languages, software, and "special" features your production servers offer.

All of the commands and configuration files you'll need to make the automatic setup work are included in the article. It's based on a Debian (Squeeze) base image and uses packages to install the needed software. They also install other PHP extensions like mycrypt, GD, curl, APC and database support (MySQL, SQLite and Postgres). They help you get Apache set up to serve the application and work with git and its hooks to push the code and run Composer.

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staging environment tutorial vagrant git apache deployment hooks



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