News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint PHP Blog:
4 Best Chart Generation Options with PHP Components
June 26, 2015 @ 08:30:29

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new article posted sharing four of the best charting libraries they've seen for use in your PHP applications. Options include both server and client side tools, making finding one for your situation easier.

Data is everywhere around us, but it is boring to deal with raw data alone. That's where visualization comes into the picture. [...] So, if you are dealing with data and are not already using some kind of charting component, there is a good chance that you are going to need one soon. That's the reason I decided to make a list of libraries that will make the task of visualizing data easier for you.

He starts with a brief comparison of the server side versus client side options, pointing out some high level advantages and disadvantages of each. He then gets into each of the libraries, giving an overview, an output example and some sample code to get you started:

  • Google Charts (Client Side)
  • FusionCharts (Client Side)
  • pChart (Server Side)
  • ChartLogix PHP Graphs (Server Side)

He ends with a wrapup of the options and links to two other possibilities you could also evaluate to find the best fit.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
chart generation option component top4 list example output code

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/4-best-chart-generation-options-php-components/

Stephan Hochdörfer:
Simple Logging Facade for PSR-3 loggers
June 17, 2015 @ 09:56:45

In his latest post Stephan Hochdörfer shares a library he's created to hopefully make it easier for developers to integrate PSR-3 compatible logging libraries into their code, a "logging facade" based on an idea from the Java world.

Lately I have seen more and more libraries picking up PSR-3 when it comes to logging. What a lot of libaries do wrong is that they depend on a concrete implementation of PSR-3, e.g. Mongolog instead of relying on the PSR-3 interface. From what I have seen this is because loggers get instantiated directly within the class. This is not a bad thing but it couples your code to a concrete implementation of PSR-3 which in turn means that there`s no interoperability.

The Java community solved the problem by creating a Simple Logging Facade library (SLF4) which I "ported" to PHP last week.

The library makes provides a simple static interface to setting the PSR-3 logger of your choice and fetching it from anywhere in your application. He includes an example of what the code would look like for a basic Monolog instance. He ends the post talking about this method for getting/setting the logger instance and how it compares to using other options like a dependency injection container or even just a manual call to a setter.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
logger facade factory psr3 monolog example library

Link: https://blog.bitexpert.de/blog/simple-logging-facade-for-psr-3-loggers/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PHP Authorization with JWT (JSON Web Tokens)
June 04, 2015 @ 09:51:17

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a tutorial posted showing you how to handle authorization with JWTs, JSON Web Tokens. These tokens provide a bit more context around the current session including things like when the token was issued and when it should time out.

If you like computer security topics, you will know that one of the most discussed and controversial topics is user authentication. Within its context, you will find a broad range of study areas, from new mechanisms to usability. It is, thus, to my surprise that JSON Web Tokens is a topic not often talked about, and I think it deserves to be in the spotlight today. We will see how easy it is to integrate it in an API authentication mechanism.

He starts with a comparison of JWTs and sessions, pointing out both similarities and differences between the two. He then gets into the official JWT specification (an approved RFC) that defines the structure and what a resulting JWT string looks like. He then moves on and shows how to integrate them with a current application via the php-jwt library. He helps you get the dependencies installed and sets up both the encoding and decoding methods. He integrates this with a simple frontend Javascript request to fetch content and push it into the page. This request verifies the JWT on receipt and returns 400 HTTP error codes if this fails.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
tutorial jwt jsonwebtoken phpjwt authorization example resource

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/php-authorization-jwt-json-web-tokens/

HHVM Blog:
Covariance, Contravariance, and super Type Constraints
May 29, 2015 @ 10:13:24

The HHVM blog has a new post that talks about covariance, contravariance, and super type constraints - enhancements to the previous generics handling in the Hack language.

Hack has recently enhanced its generics with two features: variance annotations and super type constraints. In this post, I'll explain how they work and why they were added.

They start with variance and how the idea of covariance (consistent type variance in class parameters) fits in. They include a code example showing how this typing works and some of the issues with following this covariance flow. Following this they talk about contravariance, the opposite of covariance, where the typing can be used as a parameter type but not a return type. They go on to talk about the idea of "super type constraints" and how they augment the current type constraint handling to provide improved type resolution. They end the post with a bit about how "super" relates to "as" constraints and a historical note about some hard-coded class names that are always resolved as either co- or contravariant by the typechecker.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
covariance contravariance super typeconstraints example history

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/9215/covariance-contravariance-and-super-type-constraints

Marc Aube:
Design Pattern Specification
May 25, 2015 @ 12:19:47

Marc Aube has a new post to his site that introduces you to the specification design pattern, a technique that's useful for ensuing the current state of an object is valid.

The specification pattern is a software design pattern used to codify business rules that state something about an object. These simple predicates determine if an object's state satisfies a certain business criteria. They can then be combined to form composite specifications using logical operators. Use a specification to encapsulate a business rule which does not belong inside entities or value objects, but is applied to them.

He suggests a few things the pattern could be useful for like validating the current state or define how an object should be created. He gives a few more "real world" examples and then gets into the code to create a custom specification. In his "CustomerIsPremium" spec he defines a single method on an interface to determine if the Customer given is correct. He then creates a class instance and encapsulates the logic inside its "isSatisfiedBy" method. He also includes a bit more complex example, showing how to create a composite specification for handling grouping like "and", "or" and "not" assertions. Finally he looks at how to build specifications that can be passed in and used as selection criteria. He does point out that this can leak database handling into the specification layer, however, and should really be avoided without a inversion of control method in place.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
specification designpattern pattern example composite select validate

Link: http://marcaube.ca/2015/05/specifications/

Anthony Ferrara:
Prefix Trees and Parsers
May 19, 2015 @ 10:13:18

Anthony Ferrara has a new post, following up from his previous look at tries and lexers, continuing along the path to apply what he learned to a HTTP routing system.

In my last post, Tries and Lexers, I talked about an experiment I was doing related to parsing of JavaScript code. By the end of the post I had shifted to wanting to build a HTTP router using the techniques that I learned. Let's continue where we left off...

He starts off with thinking that lexing and parsing the routes out into their respective tokens instead of breaking them up as many do (i.e. splitting on the slashes). He shows the results of this lexing and some parser code to handle these results and turn them into something useful. He did find that the current setup caused a lot of overhead (255 new states per character) so he optimizes the processing with a "default" trie but it was still pretty intensive.

He decided to go a different way at this point, opting for the radix tree structure instead. He includes the implementation of this tree for parsing the routes and his matching lexer updates. Finally he shows how to apply code generation to the results of these changes and how coming back to the "slash splitting" could help...

0 comments voice your opinion now!
lexer parser example prefix tree radixtree route matching slashes

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2015/05/prefix-trees-and-parsers.html

Simon Holywell:
Memoization or function cache
May 18, 2015 @ 11:09:17

Simon Holywell's latest post shares an interesting feature of PHP's static function handling that lets you cache the results of a function call to improve performance.

A little known feature of PHP's static keyword is that it allows for memoization or function caching. This is a process whereby a functions heavy lifting can be cached so that subsequent calls are faster. It is possible to store any value in a memoized way such as arrays or even objects. This is done without any external side effects - that is to say that the code calling the function will require no changes to support memoization.

He includes an example of this in action, showing the use of a "static" keyword on a variable over two function calls. He goes through and explains how it works and the flow of the simple function. He builds this up a bit and shows the same functionality in the handling (and parsing) of a JSON document. He then gets more into the "real world" usage of this kind of static handling, pointing out that it can be very useful for caching without the need for an external service (like memcache or redis). His final example shows the caching of a function call using the same method and dependent on the arguments provided.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
function cache static example tutorial memoization

Link: https://www.simonholywell.com/post/2015/05/memoization-or-function-cache/

Anthony Ferrara:
Tries and Lexers
May 18, 2015 @ 09:47:32

Anthony Ferrara has an interesting new post to his site talking about tries and lexers, two pieces of a puzzle that are used during script execution. In this case, he's tried his hand at writing a parser which, naturally, lead to needing a lexer.

Lately I have been playing around with a few experimental projects. The current one started when I tried to make a templating engine. Not just an ordinary one, but one that understood the context of a variable so it could encode/escape it properly. [...] So, while working on the templating engine, I needed to build a parser. Well, actually, I needed to build 4 parsers. [...] I decided to hand write this dual-mode parser. It went a lot easier than I expected. In a few hours, I had the prototype built which could fully parse Twig-style syntax (or a subset of it) including a more-or-less standards-compliant HTML parser. [...] But I ran into a problem. I didn't have a lexer...

He starts with a brief description of what a lexer is and provides a simple example of an expression and how it would be parsed into its tokens. He then talks about the trie, a method for "walking" the input and representing the results in a tree structure. He shows a simple implementation of it in PHP, iterating over a set of tokens and the array results it produces. He then takes this and expands it out a bit into a "lex" function that iterates over the string and compiles the found tokens.

From there he comes back to the subject of Javascript, pointing out that it's a lot looser than PHP in how it even just allows numbers to be defined. His testing showed a major issue though - memory consumption. He found that a regular expression method consumed too much and tried compiling out to classes instead (and found it much faster once the process was going).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
lexer parser example javascript tries tree data structure

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2015/05/tries-and-lexers.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
More Effective PHP Logging with Loggly
May 08, 2015 @ 11:54:13

The SitePoint PHP Blog has a new tutorial by Yones Rafie showing you how to log more effectively with Loggly, a remote log management service that's easy to connect to your PHP application. (Note: this post is sponsored by Loggly but it's still an interesting tool.)

When logging with PHP, we tend to use the error_log and trigger_error functions, or we can use an error handler to make the logging process more generic. [...] But what would you do if you had to log to multiple places at the same time, or you were sending logs to a given service depending on the error level? Rather than using built-in tools, it's often easier to use logging libraries.

They go on to talk about logging using a PSR-3 compliant logger and show how to integrate the Loggly service with your application via one of the most popular options, Monolog. The integration is made even easier by the fact that Monolog already comes with a LogglyHandler built-in. The post includes the code you'll need to implement the logger, how to integrate it with a Laravel application, setting it up on Heroku and and a tour of the Loggly features for filtering, searching and examples of the graphs showing query results. Loggly is free to try out, so you can see if it will work for your application before making the commitment.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
loggly logging psr3 monolog tutorial error laravel heroku interface example

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/effective-php-logging-loggly/

Propser Otemuyiwa:
Developing a Micro-Service with Lumen
May 07, 2015 @ 09:55:57

Propser Otemuyiwa has a quick new post to his site showing you how to make a micro-service with Lumen, the recently introduced microframework from the creators of Laravel.

I introduced Lumen to you all in my previous post. Today we'll be creating a simple microservice with Lumen. [...] So, the idea is to build a microservice that showcases your Developer Evangelist status based on the number of public repos you have on Github. The assumption here is that the more publicly available repos you have on github, the more you support the idea of Open source..giving back to the community.

He walks you through the full process:

  • Creating the Lumen project
  • Serving up the new application
  • Enabling Eloquent and the .env handling
  • Adding a single index route

He then fills in the route handling with a bit of code to pull from GitHub and get the number of public repositories a user has and assigns them a "rank" based on that.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
microservice microframework lumen tutorial github example introduction project

Link: http://prosperotemuyiwa.com/developing-a-micro-service-with-lumen/


Community Events

Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


symfony community application conference list podcast api php7 example interview introduction laravel series composer framework language project opinion yii2 part2

All content copyright, 2015 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework