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Dawn Casey:
Things Developers Say
June 05, 2014 @ 09:13:45

In this new post from Dawn Casey (wife of the infamous Keith Casey) she talks about some of her "growing pains" around becoming a new developer and the learning process. She's come up against some interesting problems in the course of her learning, both good and frustrating.

In the course of my learning development (seven months at this point) I've heard quite a few things from other veteran developers, all of whom were trying to be helpful. Or I'd ask a question and get one of these things in response because it makes sense to *them*…they don't realize I have no point of reference. [...] I'm frustrated because they can't explain whatever it is I don't understand..mostly because I don't understand exactly what it is I'm not understanding.

Her frustration comes not only from not being able to ask the right questions, but also from being a "blind deaf alien" thrown into the world of development. She point out an issue common to those trying to get into programming: the wealth of information one needs to know before getting started. She also mentions another common problem, particularly for new developers (or those looking to improve one certain skill): the sometimes unhelpful nature of other, more experienced developers. While some are happy to help and guide you through the learning process, there's others that will just toss you a tutorial link and call it a day.

Here's the gist of what I'm saying: There is so much back-knowledge needed to be a web developer today that many are derailed for months trying to learn everything they need to know before they can learn anything at all. PLEASE REMEMBER THIS!!
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Link: http://sdawncasey.wordpress.com/2014/06/04/things-developers-say/

Reddit.com:
Frameworks, is the learning curve too steep
October 04, 2013 @ 12:58:17

Over on Reddit.com there's a great conversation happening after the poster asked if the learning curve is too steep for most of the PHP frameworks these days.

Does anyone else find the learning curve for most frameworks just too steep, so many times I've started a project and within a day or 2 I just think fuck it and start again with raw php, I just seem to be so much faster that way. But I know, well I think I know because everyone else says, frameworks speed up development, so how do I get over the initial learning curve, so I can get on with the project and not get stuck in laravel/symphony/yii/framework-of-the-month documentation?

There's a lot of comments on the post (100+ at the time of this posting) with a good range of opinions including things like:

  • it's not that the framework learning curve is too high, it's that the learning curve of PHP is too shallow
  • It might seem too steep to those not familiar with the concepts behind frameworks
  • Learning some of the basic design patterns to figure out how a framework works
  • Frameworks seem to be more useful when it's a larger project with a larger team

Want to contribute to the discussion? Head over here and add your opinions.

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Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/1nno0q/frameworks_is_the_learning_curve_too_steep/

Anna Filina:
Like Athletes, Developers Need Practice Before Performing
March 22, 2013 @ 13:51:55

Anna Filina has a new post to her site today suggesting that developers are like athletes, they need to practice before they can be good at what they do.

Think of a developer as an athlete. He or she is aiming for a medal in a competition. A figure skater can't just perform a triple axel in the Olympics after seeing it done on television. This requires a lot of practice, so that when the time comes, the performance is flawless. Of course, programming doesn't have to be flawless. One must remain pragmatic, yet it still requires practice before a concept can be safely implemented without breaking the project or missing deadlines. Who will pay for that practice?

She relates the development manager to the coach of a sports team, being the one that guides the developers into being all they can be and trying out new ideas in the process. She also recommends making use of idle time between projects to prototype, do R&D and learn in general.

Developers need a sandbox. If you don't give it to them, you can end up with one of the following issues. Your entire project could become a sandbox, making it unstable. [...] If you want your developers to get better, allow time for practice, not just learning. It's necessary, easy to do when planned and provides countless benefits to your company. Let me know how that advice worked out for you.
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Chris Hartjes:
The Birth of Grumpy Learning
December 03, 2012 @ 12:51:45

Chris Hartjes (aka "The Grumpy Programmer") has made a name for himself in the PHP community as a big proponent of testing of all sorts in web applications. He's taking things to the next level with his own "Grumpy Learning" grouping.

As I also create more products I need a place for them all to live. I have books, and now a course I can teach and I am planning on producing screencasts for sale as well. With that in mind, I am happy to announce I have created Grumpy Learning, an umbrella site for all my training and teaching efforts to hang from.

His first book covered writing testable application, his second book looks more specifically at using PHPUnit. His latest offering is a PHP Testing Bootcamp - a three-session guided look at some of the concepts he shares not only in his books but also from his own experience (January 3rd, 10th & 17th).

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Ian Barber's Blog:
Linear Regression in PHP (part 2)
October 19, 2011 @ 12:40:16

In a previous post Ian Barber started looking at code you could use to determine linear regression in PHP. In part two he restructures the code into a more manageable class rather than the mostly procedural process it was before.

In the last post we had a simple stepping algorithm, and a gradient descent implementation, for fitting a line to a set of points with one variable and one 'outcome'. As I mentioned though, it's fairly straightforward to extend that to multiple variables, and even to curves, rather than just straight lines. For this example I've reorganised the code slightly into a class to make life a little easier, but the main changes are just the hypothesis and learn functions.

He restructures the learning method to make it easier to reuse and includes a "scale data" method to compensate for irregularities in the data and compute the variance.

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Ken Guest's Blog:
Book Review Learning Facebook Application Development
August 29, 2008 @ 07:51:20

Ken Guest has posted a book review today of an offering from Packt Publishing, Learning Facebook Application Development (by Hasin Hayder and Dr Mark Alexander Bain).

The book was published prior to Facebook's facelift but this doesn't really impact on the usefulness of the book. An overview of FBML, FQL, FBJS (a restricted subset of JavaScript and enforced for security reasons) are given along with information on how to use the test consoles, publish to news feeds, some multimedia aspects of what can be done in Facebook applications and more.

He notes that the book focuses on a PHP5-only world for developing the apps and opts for MySQL as the database of choice. Overall, he found it useful - more so than the online documentation, especially for beginners.

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Kae Verens' Blog:
Book Review Learning PHP Data Objects
June 09, 2008 @ 10:22:25

Kae Verens has posted a review of another of Packt Publishing's PHP-related offerings, "Learning PHP Data Objects" by Dennis Popel (published in Aug 2007).

Learning PHP Data Objects, by Dennis Popel, is an introduction to PDO, which walks through the building of a believable test example - a library manager for your home library. [...] I really couldn't find very much about this book that I didn't like. Ignoring the appendices, the book is 154 pages purely devoted to teaching PDO through examples, including error handling, working with BLOBs, even the creation of the M in MVC (Models).

The review mentions Models, Active Record and how the book creates a Library manager application that includes the use of prepared statements and transactions.

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Rob Allen's Blog:
A review of "Learning PHP Data Objects"
May 05, 2008 @ 13:44:10

Rob Allen has posted a review of the Packt Publishing book "Learning PHP Data Objects" over on his blog today:

Packt Publishing recently sent me a couple of books to review. This post is about the second one I received, Learning PHP Data Objects by Dennis Popel. I was excited to receive this book as PDO underlies a lot of the Zend_Db_Adapter objects that I use in my day to day programming. It seemed like a good idea that I should know more about it.

He provides some good detail of what the book covers (chapter by chapter) as well as a summary including his recommendation for who should use the book and how they can best enjoy its contents.

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Zend Developer Zone:
Book Review Learning PHP Data Objects
December 28, 2007 @ 07:58:00

The Zend Developer Zone has posted a review of Packt Publishing's "Learning PHP Data Objects" book writen up by Akash Mehta.

In Learning PHP Data Objects, the author Dennis Popel examines this new [database access] system and explains how to begin using PDO in development as a replacement for typical database drivers. The book is an excellent introduction to the data abstraction layer and also provides essential insight into the inner workings of database interaction with PHP.

Akash talks briefly about the history of PDO and what it can be used for first, then gets into the contents of the book (things like the intro chapters and the quality of the writing). The thing he thinks makes the bok stand out, though, is the examples and sample code that reflect both simple methods and more complex issues PDO developers might run into.

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Derick Rethans' Blog:
PHP5. Wprowadzenie
July 24, 2006 @ 06:04:20

David Sklar has a quick mention of him recieving a Polish tranlation of his book, "Learning PHP5".

I just received a copy of PHP5. Wprowadzenie, the Polish translation of Learning PHP 5.

He also jokes about one of the code listings in the book, trying to figure out what "Kurczak generała O'Tso" might be.

If you would like to order this translation of the book, you can pick it up at helion.pl.

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