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Esben Petersen:
A modern REST API in Laravel 5 Part 1: Structure
Mar 09, 2017 @ 10:44:56

Esben Petersen has kicked off his series on creating a modern REST framework in Laravel 5 with part one in the series. This first tutorial focuses on the setup of the application using a "folders by component" approach.

Over time when your API grows in size it also grows in complexity. Many moving parts work together in order for it to function. If you do not employ a scaleable structure you will have a hard time maintaining your API. New additions will cause side effects and breakage in other places etc.

It is important to realize in software development no singular structure is the mother of all structures. It is important to build a toolbox of patterns which you can employ given different situations. This article will serve as an opinionated piece on how such a structure could look.

The tutorial covers structure on three different levels (patterns): application flow, project folder structure and resource folder structure. For each level they cover some of the basic concepts involved and share code showing how it could be implemented including controllers, repositories, middleware and fitting it all into a a resource folder structure.

tagged: laravel rest api laravel5 tutorial series part1 structure

Link: http://esbenp.github.io/2016/04/11/modern-rest-api-laravel-part-1/

Nikola Poša:
Testing conventions
Feb 17, 2017 @ 10:31:32

In a new post to his site Nikola Poša has suggested some testing conventions he's worked up over his time in development across projects.

Testing is an essential aspect of development, and test code should be treated the same way with regard to defining and using coding conventions and standards.

This time I would like to share few conventions that I follow when writing unit tests in particular, some of which I adopted only recently.

He breaks it down into three main sections:

  • Structure (file locations and namespacing)
  • Naming (files and testing methods)
  • Arrange-Act-Assert with exceptions and test doubles

Example code is included showing the concepts and implementation of the suggested convention, just to name a few.

tagged: testing convention tutorial structure naming arrange act assert

Link: http://blog.nikolaposa.in.rs/2017/02/13/testing-conventions/

Nikola Poša:
On structuring PHP projects
Jan 17, 2017 @ 10:17:18

Nikola Poša has shared some advice form his own experience on structuring PHP projects and some alternatives to some of the typical structures seen across many packages and applications.

An indispensable part of every programming project is how you structure it, which involves organizing files and sources into directories, naming conventions, and similar. As your application grows, so does the need for structuring it in way that it is easy to manage and maintain.

In most cases, structure of an average PHP-based application is dictated or influenced by the framework that is being used, which is something I'm opposed to. With no intention to be intrusive and without any bias towards specific framework, I'll share with you how I think about organizing my PHP projects.

He starts with a common directory structure seen in a wide range of projects in a framework agnostic way. He mentions the PHP-PDS project that tries to promote this same structure but also provides some alternatives:

  • grouping by archetype
  • grouping by feature
  • splitting out domain and general-purpose code

For each he provides an example of the directory structure and explains the rationale behind it a bit.

tagged: project structure applications grouping archetype feature domain

Link: http://blog.nikolaposa.in.rs/2017/01/16/on-structuring-php-projects/

Stefan Koopmanschap:
Best practices on bundles in Symfony
Dec 29, 2016 @ 10:53:39

Stefan Koopmanschap has a new post to his site sharing some best practices with bundles in Symfony including structure of both the bundle and the application it lives in.

On one of my recent commutes I started listening to the Sound of Symfony podcast. As I had just discovered that one, I decided to listen to their most recent episode, which is on best practices for bundles. I quite disagreed with what was being said in the podcast. I started voicing my disagreement on Twitter but quickly decided that 140 characters is not enough to really explain my disagreement. So here's a blogpost.

He starts by talking about some of the current "best practices" documentation (like this book) and the parts of it he disagrees with. He talks about the use of the AppBundle, the general structure of a Symfony project and the use of bundles to provide better structure to your own code. He covers the placement of you code (your "domain") and the integration of the idea of bounded contexts. He finishes the post with some of his own experience with various frameworks and both good and bad project structures - and how sometimes the default framework structure isn't really what's needed.

tagged: symfony bestpractice bundles structure application opinion soundofsymfony

Link: http://leftontheweb.com/blog/2016/12/29/best-practices-on-bundles-symfony/

Paul Jones:
Package Development Standards: "pds/skeleton" Now Open For Review!
Dec 16, 2016 @ 10:54:14

Paul Jones has a post to his site with a proposal for a standard structure for PHP packages to help provide consistency across the PHP package ecosystem. His proposal - the Package Development Standards initiative - defines the structure of the repository instead of conventions to be used in the package itself (like naming or object structure).

The new pds/skeleton (and the related research) for public review. If you are a package author, you are invited to post your comments and criticisms of the publication as issues on the relevant Github repository.

The pds/skeleton publication describes a set of standard top-level PHP package directories and files. If you are an author of more than three packages on Packagist, chances are you already follow the standard! That’s because PDS initiative researches the PHP package ecosystem to recognize commonly adopted development practices.

He's putting it out there for public review for now until he can get some feedback from the community on the structure and recommendations made. He also recommends going a head and adding "pds/skeleton" to your "require-dev" section to indicate your compliance to the suggestions he's presented.

tagged: package structure repository standard definition opinion composer

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6457

Phil Sturgeon:
PHP-FIG: 3.0 or Rebrand
Aug 31, 2016 @ 10:38:01

Phil Sturgeon has a new post to his site giving a brief overview of the state of the PHP-FIG, the v3.0 proposal that's been put out and sharing some of his own thoughts on both.

I was involved in the PHP-FIG since 2012, and I have seen every conversation, been part of every decision, and know the reasoning for a lot of stuff, regardless of the result and my person preferences. Being so involved with this group for so long, I have a fair bit of context that other people are lacking.

The latest of about four large conversations in the FIG is: whether or not a new organization should take its place. Seeing it framed in this way is odd, because I'm not sure anyone is literally proposing that.

Phil covers some of the background behind the PHP-FIG group including some of the original goals and how it grew well beyond the "framework" part of its name. He talks about some of the reasons he sees that the group has stayed around. Then he gets into the FIG v3.0 proposal - a relaunch of the group with a different structure and different way of getting things done (after learning from some of the mistakes in the current group). He also talks about the other elephant (elePHPant?) in the room: whether this new structure calls for a new group to be formed or if the PHP-FIG should just adapt and move on.

It will be interesting to see how this all shakes out in the end but the PHP-FIG group has, undoubtedly, helped to usher in a lot of the "modern PHP" work we see in the community now especially when it comes to things like Composer, logger structure and middleware handling.

tagged: phpfig v3 proposal organization structure framework psr

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/php/2016/08/30/php-fig-3-0-or-rebrand/

Magium Blog:
3 Best Practices for Selenium Testing when Constructing Your Page
Feb 17, 2016 @ 09:55:26

In a new post to the Magium site Kevin Schroeder shares three helpful tips you can use for the Selenium testing of your application based on some of his recent development on the project.

Having spent now about two months building out Magium there are a couple of things that are worth sharing as I’ve been working through several different versions of Magento. These practices (best practices?) may or may not be “officialized” by the Overlords of the Internet but what I have found is that I have the most trouble when these practices are not executed.

The basic premise behind each of these is that the quickest path to the most specific element is best.

His three tips avoid things like long XPath expressions to locate single items and favor consistency and simplicity:

  • Wrap ALL text in an HTML element – leave no orphaned text
  • If an element has function, identify it.
  • Group data using classes and IDs

He ends the post with a reminder that a well-structured page not only helps with testing but is also a good goal to strive for related to maintainability.

tagged: selenium testing magento tips top3 structure

Link: http://magiumlib.com/blog/3-best-practices-for-selenium-testing-when-constructing-your-page/

Davey Shafik:
The Visibility Debate
Feb 16, 2016 @ 10:43:04

Davey Shafik has a post to his site with some of his thoughts about the "visibility debate" - essentially when the different method/property visibility types make the most sense.

A lot has been said about when to use public/private/protected. Some say that you should never use private, while others say you should never use protected.

About the only thing that people can seem to agree on is that public should be used with caution. That your versioning should be based around your public API, and you have a responsibility to maintain that API. The issue is mainly around the maintenance responsibility of protected vs private. Given that other developers can depend upon protected, it can effectively be considered to have the same overhead as your public API.

He shares some of his own reasoning behind how he uses the different levels in his own code. He touches on each of the different levels, sharing when and how he thinks it should be used to keep a well-structured, consistent API for your library or application.

tagged: visibility opinion public private protected api structure consistency

Link: https://daveyshafik.com/archives/69929-the-visibility-debate.html

Rudi Theunissen:
Efficient data structures for PHP 7
Feb 09, 2016 @ 10:49:37

In this recent article over on Medium.com Rudi Theunissen looks at more efficient data structures for PHP 7 and the introduction of a library that wants to help replace some of the current functionality and dependencies on things like arrays.

PHP has one data structure to rule them all. The array is a complex, flexible, master-of-none, hybrid data structure, combining the behaviour of a list and a linked map. But we use it for everything, because PHP is pragmatic.

[...] The recent release of PHP 7 caused a lot of excitement in the PHP community. We couldn't wait to start using the new features and get a taste of the ~2x performance boost. One of the reasons why it runs that much faster is because the array was redesigned. But it’s still the same structure, “optimised for everything; optimised for nothing” with room for improvement.

He starts with a brief mention of some of the current topics around data structures - the SPL functionality, why fixing them would be difficult and, finally, introducing the library that seeks to supersede them. The remainder of the post goes through the pieces of functionality the library offers and explains how each works including videos and graphs of the performance results:

  • Collection
  • Sequence
  • Vector
  • Deque
  • Stack
  • Queue and PriorityQueue
  • Hashable
  • Map
  • Set

He also answers some of the most common questions he's gotten about the library including the level of testing, documentation for the project and why he structured certain elements and features how he did.

tagged: data structure php7 library ds spl optimized video code

Link: https://medium.com/@rtheunissen/efficient-data-structures-for-php-7-9dda7af674cd#.xg74fpxwg

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Appserver – Server Configuration, Dir Structure and Threads
Feb 01, 2016 @ 09:25:05

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series looking at the features of the appserver.io project in this second post covering its server configuration, directory structure and how it handles threads during processing.

In the first part of our Appserver series, we discussed the very high level differences of Appserver’s architecture to standard web server stacks and got you up and running with an Appserver instance.

[...] In this part, we will be exploring the Appserver architecture a bit more in depth. We will go through the concepts of the different contexts and the parts of Appserver you get out of the box, which cover some of the ground most of the popular PHP frameworks offer. We will also configure the web server and look into an application’s structure. Once we are finished, you should have a fair understanding about Appserver’s contexts in relation to threading, the web server, and its setup.

They start with the threading functionality, showing how "contexts" come in to play and how the code executes as long as this context is alive. The post then gets into some of the code-related differences with using appserver such as extra annotation handling and AOP (aspect oriented programming) practices. From there they get into the tech behind the scenes: configuring the web server, setting up a virtual host and pointing it at the sample application. Finally they talk about the servlet engine and the server's directory structure underneath.

tagged: appserverio project opensource server configuration directory structure thread processsing

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/appserver-server-configuration-dir-structure-and-threads/