News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with FigDice
November 21, 2014 @ 12:19:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series highlighting the FigDice template rendering system. In this latest article Lukas White focuses on FigDice's ability to "pull" data into templates as needed rather than having it injected.

Amongst the many templating systems out there, most work in pretty much the same way; variables are "injected" using some syntax or another, be it curly braces, percentage signs or whatever that library's convention happens to be. They'll usually have basic control structures, such as if...then and, of course, iteration. FigDice, however, takes an altogether different approach. Inspired by PHPTAL - the subject of a future article - it gives the view layer the responsibility of "pulling" in the data it requires, rather than relying on controllers to assemble and "push" it into the templates.

He walks you through the installation of the tool (via Composer) and how to create a basic FigDice view to work with (including template loading). He uses a sample Silex-based application for his examples, making a layout with the FigDice additions to the attributes. He then shows how to make the template for the main index page with a "mute" region for the include logic. He shows how to include this basic template into the view and render it directly as output. Next he shows how to integrate data with the template, pulling in "tweets" from an array dataset via a loop (walk) and a factory to provide the template the data.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
figdice template tutorial series part2 data integration

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-figdice/

Paul Jones:
Action-Domain-Responder and the "Domain Payload" Pattern
October 01, 2014 @ 10:16:11

Paul Jones has a new post with more information about his proposed "Action-Domain-Responder" design pattern (a replacement for the typical MVC) and suggests a new piece, the Domain Payload pattern. This pattern would use a domain payload object to wrap the data and provide the responder with additional handling and context.

In Action-Domain-Responder the Action passes input to the Domain layer, which then returns some data for the Action to pass to the Responder. In simple scenarios, it might be enough for the Responder to inspect the data to determine how it should present that data. In more complex scenarios, though, it would make more sense for the Domain to pass back the data in a way that indicates the status of the data. Instead of the Responder inspecting the Domain results, the Domain should tell us what kind of results they are.

He shows a code example of this Domain Payload object in action, starting with some typical MVC code and refactoring it along the way into an ADR structure. He shifts from a typical model into a more domain-driven approach and describes the wrapping of the data in the payload, context for the contents (even just a class name helps) and how those relate to the actual output. You can find the resulting code in this example over on Paul's GitHub account.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
action domain responder mvc adr payload wrapper context data

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6043

Sameer Borate:
Data cleaning in PHP applications
September 22, 2014 @ 09:41:56

Sameer Borate has a new post today showing the use of a "cleaner" library to help sanitize the data input to your application. In this tutorial he introduces you to Mr Clean, an "extendible PHP Data Cleaner".

Scrubbers or data cleaners are an important part of the data transformation process. Whenever you are involved in some data import or export process, data scrubbers can help you clean and standardize your data elements before storing. There are many libraries that help in sanitizing and cleaning data. One such I recently found is mr-clean; it is a extendible PHP Data Cleaner that you can use in your PHP applications to clean heterogeneous data before storing it in your database or other persistent storage like CSV files.

He walks you through the installation (via Composer) and the creation of an instance of the main "cleaner" object. He then provides a few examples of some data scrubbing features it offers:

  • Basic scrubbing (trim, stripping HTML tags, etc)
  • Booleans
  • Filtering HTML
  • Stripping CSS attributes
  • Nullify
  • Null if repeated
  • Strip Phone Number
  • Pre/Post scrubbing handling

He finishes up the post with a look at creating a custom scrubber class, an "only numeric" handler that replaces any character that's not a number in a string with an empty string (removing it).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
data cleaning mrclean library introduction tutorial

Link: http://www.codediesel.com/data/data-cleaning-in-php-applications/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Build a Database with Eloquent, Faker and Flysystem
August 28, 2014 @ 11:55:09

In the latest post to the SitePoint PHP blog Aleksander Koko continues with his series about creating an application with PHP and EmberJS with a look at building databases. In the first part of the series he introduced the main toolset and set up a simple Laravel application inside of a Homestead instance. This latest post builds on that platform.

In this part, we will create the structure of the database. We will create the tables using migrations and seed the database using seeders. Also, you will learn how to grab some random images from LoremPixel and put them on the filesystem using Flysystem. You'll also be adding some randomly generated data using the Faker library. Much like with part 1, you can download this part's code from github.

He shows you how to get all the needed libraries installed and run the migrate command to create the needed tables. He also helps you set up a Dropbox application so you can use their API and configure the application with your API settings. Next he modifies the migrations and seeds the sample data. Next up he makes the models for each of the tables and integrates Faker to populate them with better seed data, making seeder classes to handle some of the more custom logic.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
database eloquent faker flysystem dropbox seed data tutorial emberjs

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/build-database-eloquent-faker-flysystem/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Data Validation in Laravel - Introduction & Custom Validators
August 12, 2014 @ 13:59:16

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the first two parts of a new series looking at how to do data validation in Laravel, a popular PHP framework. Laravel comes with a set of included validators that can easily be used to check incoming data. This article series introduces them and the features they can provide.

If an app was a world then data would be its currency. Every app, no matter what its purpose, deals in data. And almost every type of app works with user input, which means it expects some data from users and acts on it accordingly. But that data needs to be validated to make sure it is of correct type and a user (with nefarious intent) is not trying to break or crack into your app. Which, if you are making an application which requires user input, is why you would need to write code to validate that data as well before you do anything with it.

In the first part of the series they start with an example of doing validation the "old way". They reproduce this same validation using the Laravel validators and show how to introduce it as a service to the overall application. Their "RocketCandy" validation service can then handle the same validations and make for a cleaner interface in the calling script. It's refactored even more to include exceptions when the validation fails and the HTML for outputting the error messages thrown. Unit tests are also included to ensure things are working as they should.

In the second part of the series they build on the examples from part one and introduce custom validators. An example of validation around dashes, spaces and alphanumeric data is included (using regular expressions) and how they can be defined as custom validation rules.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
data validation laravel introduction custom validator framework

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/series/data-validation-in-laravel-the-right-way/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Diffbot Crawling with Visual Machine Learning
August 01, 2014 @ 11:37:12

On the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc has posted a tutorial showing you how to use the Diffbot service to extract data from any page. He introduces both the service itself and walks you through a simple request via Guzzle.

Have you ever wondered how social networks do URL previews so well when you share links? How do they know which images to grab, whom to cite as an author, or which tags to attach to the preview? Is it all crawling with complex regexes over source code? Actually, more often than not, it isn't. [...] If you want to build a URL preview snippet or a news aggregator, there are many automatic crawlers available online, both proprietary and open source, but you seldom find something as niche as visual machine learning. This is exactly what Diffbot is - a "visual learning robot" which renders a URL you request in full and then visually extracts data, helping itself with some metadata from the page source as needed.

He uses a combination of a Laravel installation (via a Homestead instance) and a Guzzle request using a fetched token. The service offers a 10k call limit on a 7 day free trial, so you can sign up and grab your token there. He includes code for an example request fetching a SitePoint page and parsing out the tags. He also briefly looks at the custom handling diffbot allows based on CSS-type rules.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
diffbot parse data service api guzzle homestead tutorial introduction

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/diffbot-crawling-visual-machine-learning/

NetTuts.com:
Understanding and Working with Relationships Between Data in WordPress
August 01, 2014 @ 09:21:54

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series looking at the "guts" of a typical WordPress installation. In the first part they gave an overview of the structure and contents of the various database tables. In this second part they get more into the relationships between them.

In the first part of this series on data in WordPress, I gave an overview of the WordPress database tables, and which tables are used to store what kind of data. In this second part, I'll outline how WordPress manages the relationships between that data. As you'll see, WordPress uses three kinds of data relationship - one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. I'll look at each of these and what they mean for your WordPress site.

He goes through each of the relationship types and includes examples from the WordPress database to illustrate them. He then gets into a bit more depth, talking about the specifics of some relationships like: posts-to-users, posts-to-comments, comment-to-comment and the structure of the many-to-many relationships too.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
wordpress series data database relationship tutorial part2

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-and-working-with-relationships-between-data-in-wordpress--cms-20632

NetTuts.com:
Understanding and Working with Data in WordPress
July 29, 2014 @ 11:28:05

On NetTuts.com there's a new post for those new to WordPress (or just wanting to figure out more about the internals of the tool) showing how some of the data is structured and how to work with it.

Most WordPress users never come into direct contact with the database and may not even be aware that it's constantly working to populate their site. When WordPress serves up any kind of page, be that the home page, a single post or page or an archive, it's accessing the database to bring up content that editors and administrators have added to the site. In this series of tutorials I'll look in detail at different aspects of the WordPress database.

This post is the first in the series and provides an overview of the database and what kinds of information each one contains. They talk about content types and provide the table structure and relations in a handy graphical form (an ERD). They then go through each of the tables and describe what the data is including link tables, joining the content in different places.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
data wordpress introduction database table erd overview

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-and-working-with-data-in-wordpress--cms-20567

NetTuts.com:
Best Practices When Working With Sensitive Data Securing Your Application
July 21, 2014 @ 10:27:07

The NetTuts.com site has a new tutorial posted today sharing some tips about working with sensitive data in your applications and steps to secure it.

In my previous article, I showed you how to protect your server from attacks and malicious software. This part will focus completely on the third layer of security - your application itself. So here, I will show you techniques that you can use to protect your application from attacks and intrusions.

There's three main topics covered here, each with a few subpoints and some code examples:

  • Using a Database
  • Use a Salt When Hashing
  • POSIX: Drop Privileges When You Don't Need Them
0 comments voice your opinion now!
secure data application tutorial sensitive

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/best-practices-when-working-with-sensitive-data-securing-your-application--cms-21719

Timoh's Blog:
PHP data encryption cheatsheet
June 17, 2014 @ 10:52:44

Timoh has published a data encryption cheatsheet to his blog today. It's "a short guide" to help you prevent some of the more common encryption-related problems in your application, specifically around symmetric data encryption.

This cheatsheet assumes a "client-server" situation, which is probably a typical case with PHP applications. Naturally the recommendations given here are not the "only possible way" to handle data encryption in PHP, but this cheatsheet aims to be straightforward and tries to leave less room for mistakes and (possibly confusing) choices.

The cheatsheet includes information on topics like:

  • Encryption algorithm / mode of operation / nonce (initializing vector)
  • Encryption and authentication keys
  • Key stretching
  • Key storage and management
  • Data compression

It's jam-packed full of great information, so definitely check it out if you're doing any kind of encryption in PHP.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
data encryption cheatsheet common mistakes

Link: https://timoh6.github.io/2014/06/16/PHP-data-encryption-cheatsheet.html


Community Events





Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


podcast composer voicesoftheelephpant symfony community introduction tool mvc language release library framework update series security opinion interview package version laravel

All content copyright, 2014 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework