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QaFoo Blog:
Extracting Data Objects
Feb 10, 2017 @ 12:16:36

On the QaFoo blog they have a new post offering some advice on extracting functionality to data objects and reducing the complexity of your application's interfaces.

Extracting data objects from your code will make it easier to read and write, easier to test and more forward compatible. This post shows you the two most common cases where introducing a data object makes sense and how to do it.

The first case covers the extraction when a method ends up with too many parameters. We've all been there and remembering the correct order and values for each (not to mention optional vs required). By making use of value objects you can reduce that down to one or two parameters that act as self-contained "containers" for the same values. They illustrate with a refactor of "product" search criteria into a "ProductCriteria" object. The second example show a refactor away from using an array as an input value and providing a bit more structure with a "Checkout" value object instead.

The post ends with a helpful hint about migrating from one method to the other in legacy systems using a "shim" method to handle the new case right alongside the old one.

tagged: data object refactor simplicity parameters array

Link: https://qafoo.com/blog/096_refactoring_extract_data_objects.html

MyBuilder Tech Blog:
Designing Immutable Concepts with Transient Mutation in PHP
Dec 15, 2016 @ 09:46:11

The MyBuilder.com Tech blog has a new post from Edd Mann looking at designing immutable concepts in PHP with "transient mutation".

In a recent project we felt it beneficial to introduce the Money pattern. There are many good resources on this pattern, so I will delegate to those for further definition. We decided that encapsulating this into a immutable value object allowed for a cleaner API and removed the fear of any unexpected mutation bugs. However, we noticed a spike in memory and processor usage when wishing to perform many successive actions on such values i.e. summation.

In such a case, new ‘temporary’ Money objects would be instantiated upon each applied addition. As many of these objects were simply a stepping stone to generating the final result, they were just left for the Garbage collector to clean-up.

The idea of "transients" is something pulled from the Clojure language allowing for the mutation of the immutable object and returning a new immutable one....with with some controls, not free form mutation. He includes showing an example of a "Money" object that implements this concept including a "withMutable" method that handles a callback for the mutation operation.

tagged: immutable object transient mutation control tutorial

Link: http://tech.mybuilder.com/designing-immutable-concepts-with-transient-mutation-in-php/

QaFoo Blog:
Introduction To Page Objects
Sep 06, 2016 @ 11:03:17

The QaFoo blog has a post to their blog introducing page objects and how they're useful in functional testing to help provide a "decoupling" from the actual frontend.

A while ago we wrote about writing acceptance tests (end-to-end tests) with Mink and PHPUnit. While this is a great set of tools for various applications such tests tend be susceptible to changes in the frontend. And the way they break is often hard to debug, too. Today I will introduce you to Page Objects which can solve some of these problems.

The basic idea behind a Page Object is that you get an object oriented representation of your website. The Page Objects maps the HTML (or JSON) to an object oriented structure you can interact with and assert on. This is more initial work then than writing tests with PHPUnit and Mink directly, but it can be worth the effort.

They use the Mnk testing tool to simulate a browser and some previously shared functionality to lay the foundation. From there they write up a first test using a "Login" page object and processing the username/password handling of the page. They show how to implement a custom page object with a bit of additional logic and put it to use in processing the request. They also include an update when, for example, a site is switched from Twig templates to a React.js component and how the Page object would need to be refactored for the update.

tagged: page object functional test mink behat example tutorial

Link: https://qafoo.com/blog/089_introduction_to_page_objects.html

Adam Wathan:
Customizing Keys When Mapping Collections
Jul 19, 2016 @ 10:52:29

Adam Wathan has a new post to his site talking about mapping with collections and customizing the keys when injecting new data into your Laravel collections.

People often ask me, “how do I specify keys when I’m mapping a collection?”

It actually ends up being a pretty interesting topic, so I decided to cover it in a short screencast, as well as in written format below.

He shows how to translate a simple set of data into a much more slimmed down version. He points out that the "map" function could be used but it doesn't allow for setting keys. Instead he talks briefly about how the problem could be solved in Javascript (returning an object instead of an array) and how to use the "reduce" method to filter and reset the data as it goes through the array. He finishes out the post talking about learning from other languages, the "toAssoc" macro on Laravel collections and mapping the data back to an array with a custom macro.

tagged: customize key mapping collection laravel object javascript example screencast

Link: https://adamwathan.me/2016/07/14/customizing-keys-when-mapping-collections/

Stoimen Popov:
PHP: Don’t Call the Destructor Explicitly
Jun 27, 2016 @ 12:52:39

In a new post to his site Stoimen Popov makes the recommendation to not call the destructor explicitly in your code and provides some alternatives.

PHP 5 introduces a destructor concept similar to that of other object-oriented languages, such as C++” says the documentation for destructors. [...] Well, as you can not call the constructor explicitly [...] so we should not call the destructor explicitly. The problem is that I’ve seen this many times, but it’s a pity that this won’t destroy the object and it is still a valid PHP code.

He talks about __destruct and it's role in PHP's set of "magic methods" and what they exist to do. He then gets into a few examples of what code could look like that uses a destructor and the difference between normal handling calling the destructor explicitly. The main differences is that calling it explicitly does not destroy the object, it's basically like calling any other method. He does include an interesting method for destroying the object - setting it to null - and notes that the destructor fires then too. He also points out a few interesting things about cloning objects and how object references work when setting nulls as in the previous example.

tagged: destructor explicit call object destroy null tutorial

Link: http://www.stoimen.com/blog/2011/11/14/php-dont-call-the-destructor-explicitly/

Andrew Carter:
PSR-7 Objects Are Not Immutable
May 24, 2016 @ 10:28:05

Andrew Carter has written up a new post about PSR-7 objects (the PHP-FIG defined standard for handling requests and responses in PHP applications) and how the objects themselves are immutable.

What’s happening [in the provided example] is that the Zend Expressive framework is rendering the error page to the same object that you wrote your message to. Whilst the actual message object itself is immutable, the body stream that it references is not. Even when this object is cloned or “modified” (to become a new object) it will still use the same stream.

He explains a bit about what this means in a more practical sense and why the PSR-7 standard and why this happens (as defined after much discussion). Then he gets into a more recent debate happening in the PHP-FIG about PSR-7 middleware and the proposal for a standard structure in its creation. He points to some of the thoughts from Anthony Ferrara on the topic and an example from Woody Gilk showing an exception handler and how having the stream always appending content is a bad thing in that particular case.

tagged: psr7 object immutability output zendexpressive middleware stream

Link: http://andrewcarteruk.github.io/programming/2016/05/22/psr-7-is-not-immutable.html

Mark Ragazzo:
Immutable objects
May 04, 2016 @ 13:55:42

In a post to his site Mark Ragazzo looks at immutable objects - what they are and how they can be used in a PHP application with some "final" functionality.

In this short article we will see what immutable objects are and why we should consider to use them. Immutable object is an object that does not change its state after it was created. Immutable objects usually are very simple. You may already seen them as enum types or primitives like DateTimeImmutable.

Further in this article you will learn that making simple objects immutable may save significant amount of your time by making impossible to make certain types of mistakes.

He starts with a list of a few things to remember when implementing immutable objects (like using the "final" keyword) and problems that can come without them. He then gets into some examples, showing how to create immutable Address and Money objects and how to use them when you need to update/get values from the object. He also covers some common "accidental mutability" cases like leaking internal object references and inheritance problems.

tagged: immutable object introduction example mutability accidental tutorial

Link: https://ragazzo.github.io/immutability/oop/2016/05/03/immutability.html

Ibuildings Blog:
Programming Guidelines - Part 4: Messages
Feb 17, 2016 @ 11:19:17

Ibuildings has posted the fourth part of their "Programming Guidelines" series to their blog, sharing even more helpful hints and tips you can apply to your everyday development. In this new post author Matthias Noback talks about messaging in your application, not in output to the user but in the communication between parts of your system.

In the previous parts of this series we looked at how to get rid of complexity at the level of algorithms. After discussing the problem of nulls in your code, we looked at object lifecycles and how to encapsulate them properly. Now that we have objects that can be constructed and changed only in valid ways, we need to look at how they communicate with each other and how we can improve our code with regard to that aspect.

He then breaks up the rest of the article into a few sections:

  • Object communication
  • Message categories
  • Command/Query Separation Principle
  • Implementing commands
  • Queries
  • Documents
  • Command query responsibility segregation
  • Events

For each section a description of the topic is provided and a bit of sample code is included to help illustrate the change/functionality.

tagged: programming guideline part4 series message object tutorial

Link: https://www.ibuildings.nl/blog/2016/02/programming-guidelines-part-4-messages

Ibuildings Blog:
Programming Guidelines - Part 3: The Life and Death of Objects
Feb 02, 2016 @ 11:42:05

The Ibuildings blog has posted the latest part of their series looking at some general programming guidelines and principles that can help you in your own development work. In this latest article Matthias Noback talks about the "life and death of objects" in more detail including creating, updating and how they "die".

In the first part of this series we looked at ways to reduce the complexity of function bodies. The second part covered several strategies for reducing complexity even more, by getting rid of null in our code. In this article we'll zoom out a bit and look at how to properly organize the lifecycle of our objects, from creating them to changing them, letting them pass away and bringing them back from the dead.

He starts with a brief list of things that are true about objects (they live in memory, they hide implementation, etc) and some of the issues with poor object handling. He then gets into some of the basics: creating objects (meaningful & different ways), validating the input to constructors and methods and changing them to update properties and related objects. He also suggests preferring immutable objects and talks about value objects to help towards this goal. Finally he talks about the death of objects and some of the ways you can possibly "bring them back to life".

tagged: oop object detail introduction validate immutable valueobject revive lifecycle tutorial

Link: https://www.ibuildings.nl/blog/2016/02/programming-guidelines-part-3-the-life-and-death-objects

ThePHP.cc:
How to Validate Data
Nov 10, 2015 @ 10:18:52

In this post to thePHP.cc site Sebastian Bergmann looks at validation data, both in the sense of user input and the contents of objects you're application is currently working with.

Validating data seems to be one of the most important tasks of an application. After all, you cannot trust data from external sources. So let us have a look at how to efficiently implement data validation.

He gives an example of a user profile with requirements on the data it should contain. He focuses on the email address property as it's one of the easier options to validate (or is it). He walks through the usual progression from controller injection to setter injection of the value but wonders when the validation should happen to keep the Profile object from becoming invalid. He points out that simply having a validate method perform the checks isn't enough as it may not always be called correctly, leading to potentially invalid objects. Instead he recommends an alternative - using a validator object/tool in the setters of your object instance as the values are set. This prevents the object from getting into an unknown state and provides immediate feedback to the developer when something's wrong.

tagged: data validation object recommendation setter business rules

Link: https://thephp.cc/news/2015/11/how-to-validate-data