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Master Zend Framework:
HowTo Use Child and Segment Routes to Build Simple Routing Tables
April 03, 2014 @ 11:15:05

Matthew Setter has a new post to his Master Zend Framework site today showing you how to use child and segment routes to create a routing table in your Zend Framework v2 application. These routes are "sub-routes" underneath a main route defined in the main router configuration.

Routing is one of the key requirements in modern applications, especially in Zend Framework 2; but they shouldn't be overly-complicated. Today, we're going to look at how to build a routing table, simply and easily using child and segment routes. [...] But how would we do that? Gladly, it's quite simply, using a combination of [the] two route types: Segment and Child Routes. I've made a complete example, which's available in this Gist. Feel free to skip straight to that. But otherwise, let's step through the annotated version together.

He sets the stage with an example in a "writing pipeline" application that helps him predict his income from his freelance writing. He describes the main controllers and the routing configurations they might share. In his example code, he shows how to define the routes and modify them to use segments and child routes to handle constraints. There's also a section about extracting out the segments from the route.

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child segment routes tutorial routing zendframework2

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/tutorial/child-and-segment-routes

Rob Allen's Blog:
Access view variables in another view model
April 03, 2012 @ 12:53:37

In this new post to his blog Rob Allen shows you how to access the view variables from another ViewModel.

Unlike Zend Framework 1, the view layer in Zend Framework 2 separates the variables assigned to each view model. This means that when you are in the layout view script, you don't automatically have access to variables that were assigned the the action's view model and vice versa.

He includes snippets of code with an example controller and a sample view that fetches a value from a child ViewModel instance. He also shows how to access layout and configuration values in the view.

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view model variables other scope child viewmodel zendframework2


Re-Cycled Air Blog:
PHP Dark Arts Daemonizing a Process
October 29, 2010 @ 11:02:36

On the Re-Cycled Air blog Jack Slingerland has posted another in his "Dark Arts" series looking at some of the lesser used PHP features. This time he focuses in on daemonizing a process by forking it off into the background.

One of the many things you don't often do with PHP (actually, I'm not sure you do this much with any language) is daemonize a process. A daemon is program that runs in the background (read more here). On Unix systems, processes are usually created by forking the init process and then manipulating the process to your liking. To create a daemon though, you need to get the init process to adopt your process. To do that, as soon as you fork the parent process, you kill the parent. Since you child process is parent-less, the init process generally adopts it. Once that happens, your process has been daemonized.

He uses the pcntl_fork function to spawn off the child process, detach it from a terminal window, create a ".pid" file so the system knows about it and then, of course, have the child script do something.

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daemon process child parent tutorial


Padraic Brady's Blog:
Mysteries Of Asynchronous Processing w/PHP - Pt 3 Spawned Child Processes
October 01, 2009 @ 12:35:23

Padraic Brady has posted part three of his look at asynchronous processing in PHP applications today. The previous two parts introduced you to the topic and got you ready to work with child processes in a Zend Framework application. This latest part gets into the code showing how to fork the processes and handle communication between them.

With the theory heavy portion of the series out of the way, we can begin to explore the various implementation possibilities. In this part, we will examine implementing Asynchronous Processing using a child process, i.e. a separate PHP process we create from our application during a request. We'll analyse this implementation option before introducing the source code so we may understand its advantages and disadvantages.

He looks at both the advantages and disadvantages of processing with child processes and suggests a method to get a handle on the processes rather than just spawning new processes - forking. Some basic code examples are included, using the popen function to open the new child process and a Zend Framework example.

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spawn child process asynchronous tutorial


Evert Pot's Blog:
Lighttpd + PHP fastcgi woes
September 10, 2008 @ 12:55:05

Recently Evert Pot has been having some issues with setting up lighttpd and PHP (fastcgi) for one of his web servers:

In trying to get more out of our webservers using a Lighttpd and PHP-FastCGI setup, I've come across some major issues that make it difficult to use. I hope this post will warn people of some of the bugs they might encounter and workaround that might need to be implemented until some of these are fixed.

He ran up against two problems - that the parent PHP-CGI process spawns off the configured number of children correctly but with the lighttpd server is killed, they don't get released and that, once you hit full capacity for the PHP backend lighttpd starts serving up 500 errors.

In the comments for the post several others have offered some advice on things that might help (like different config settings and even using XCache to prevent the 500s issue from coming up again).

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lighttpd fastcgi problem capacity error child orphaned


Jani Hartikainen's Blog:
Understanding Doctrine's NestedSet feature
September 02, 2008 @ 10:29:56

On his CodeUtopia blog Jani Hartikainen gives an inside look at a feature of Doctrine, nested sets.

The Doctrine library comes with a feature called nested set, which makes saving trees in a database easy. However, it's quite easy to accidentally cause a lot of extra unneeded queries if not being careful. Here are some pointers to keep in mind while working with the nested set, and some example queries to make understanding it easier.

He gives an example, showing how to get rows from the database - parent and child - and some optimization tips to keep things light. There's also some pros and cons included for doing it either way (the standard fetching or using the more optimized versions).

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doctrine nestedset feature fetch database row parent child


Daniel Cousineau's Blog:
Displaying N-Deep Trees (Remember Your Algorithms Course?)
August 07, 2008 @ 12:03:23

On his Tower of Power blog Daniel Cousineau has written up a look at using a more detailed categorization method than just a parent/child relationship on your data - Tree Traversals.

If the software calls for only 2 levels of categorization (Parent and Child only), a simple nested for loop will suffice. However, software requirements change and you'll soon find yourself up shit creek without a paddle if you need to support 3 or 4 levels of nesting. [...] To those who's training is less formal (most web developers I meet have practical training, not formal), I'll help you out: Tree Traversals (or if you are completely lost, Recursion).

He creates a recursive function that, when passed in a category set with different types in it, can handle each of them and then calls itself again with the new child data. His sample code creates url out of a set of categories.

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tree category recursion tutorial parent child loop treetraversal


DevShed:
Defining Public and Protected Methods with Member Visibility in PHP 5
June 12, 2008 @ 07:51:13

DevShed continues their series looking at variable scoping in PHP5 classes with this new look at using the public and protected keywords to "restrict member visibility".

Now that you know what will be treated in this fourth chapter of the series, it's time to learn how to declare and implement public and protected methods with PHP 5 classes. Of course, as always I'm going to address this useful topic by using a hands-on approach, which means that there's a bunch of code samples ahead, waiting patiently for you.

They talk about calling methods globally first and then move into the keyword restrictions. They show the difference between a public method/variable and a protected one, including how to get at the protected members from a child class.

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tutorial php5 protected member visibility public child


DevShed:
Parsing Child Nodes with the DOM XML extension in PHP 5
April 08, 2008 @ 09:47:48

Alejandro Gervasio has finished up his series on DevShed looking at working with the DOM extension in PHP5 with this new article, a look at parsing child nodes.

In this last chapter of the series, I'm going to teach you how to handle the child nodes of an XML document by way of two simple methods, called hasChildNode() and removeChild() respectively. So let's not waste any more time in preliminaries and learn how to use them in a helpful way.

They review some of the concepts mentioned previously before moving ahead to the use of the hasChildNodes and removeChild methods to check for children and get rid of only certain ones.

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dom xml php5 tutorial child node haschildnodes removechild


Arnold Daniels' Blog:
A dark corner of PHP class casting
February 20, 2008 @ 12:08:00

In this blog entry Arnold Daniels talks about an issue he had in the past (needing a bit more functionality than the PEAR DB library could offer) and how he ended up solving it with what he calls a "dark corner" of PHP - class casting.

PHP has a function serialize, which can create a hash from any type of variable, scalars, array, but objects as well. Using the unserialize function, PHP can recreate the variable from the serialized hashed. If we look at how an object is serialized, we see only the properties and the class name are stored.

His method allows for class manipulation via changes to the serialized class information (like changing the value of the name parameter). His "casttoclass()" function makes changing this value simple.

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