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Jason McCreary:
Update PHP on Mac OS X
Sep 20, 2016 @ 10:15:26

Jason McCreary has posted an update to his guide for installing PHP on Mac OS X and replacing the version of PHP that comes with El Capitan (5.5) with a handy package manager more specific to PHP installations.

As noted in my posts on Installing Apache, PHP and MySQL on Mac OS X, OS X comes pre-installed with Apache and PHP. Unfortunately, as of Mac OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) the pre-installed version of PHP is still 5.5. As PHP 5.5 has reached end of life, I imagine the pre-installed version of PHP will be updated with Mac OS 10.12 (Sierra). However, it may only be PHP 5.6.

So what do you do if you want to upgrade or install a different PHP version on your Mac? Well, you could use Homebrew. But I found a pre-packaged alternative - PHP OSX.

With this package manager, the installation is only a few steps but he lists them out with a bit more detail to help you understand what's happening:

  • Installing PHP (your choice of version)
  • Configuring Apache (loading the php5 shared module)
  • Updating your PATH
  • Configuring PHP
tagged: osx update language version package simple installation tutorial

Link: http://jason.pureconcepts.net/2016/09/upgrade-php-mac-os-x/

Cloudways Blog:
How To Create Simple Rest API In Symfony 3.1
Aug 30, 2016 @ 12:59:10

The Cloudways blog has posted a new tutorial helping you get up and running quickly with a simple REST API written using the Symfony framework. In the article they not only explain how to create the API but also include a bit of REST theory for those not completely familiar with the terms and functionality involved.

Symfony is fast becoming the favourite framework among developers for rapid application development. And despite releasing Symfony 3.1 and 3.2 in the previous quarter, they are still introducing many changes and upgrades. If you’re still using the previous versions, you must upgrade Symfony Framework to the latest and stable version 3.1.

Yes! We know that Symfony is one of the best frameworks to develop rest API, so in this article we will make simple rest API in Symfony 3.1. I am assuming that you’ve already setup PHPstack application on Cloudways with Symfony installed, but if you haven’t, follow this installation guide.

They briefly talk about the REST HTTP verb types and what kind of actions they relate to. With that defined the tutorial then gets into the requirements including the installation of two bundles: JMSSerializerBundle and NelmioCorsBundle. From there examples of configuration changes, commands to make users and execute migrations on the local database are included. With this system set up they include sample code for each HTTP verb type letting you perform the actions on the User entity (create, read, update and delete).

tagged: symfony rest api simple tutorial introduction phpstack

Link: https://www.cloudways.com/blog/rest-api-in-symfony-3-1/

Alex Bowers:
Writing a Hello World PHP 7 Extension
Aug 25, 2016 @ 12:25:47

In a recent post to his site Alex Bowers shows you the steps involved in creating a "Hello World" PHP 7 extension with some basic output functionality - basically just echoing out a message.

He jumps right into the code and shows you how to:

  • set up the directory and initial files for the extension
  • write the test case first (a simple PHP file checking if it's loaded and can be used)
  • updating the config.m4 to allow for enabling the extension
  • the code for src/hello.h to define the function

The final piece is the code in the src/hello.c - the C code to define some structure for the PHP interpreter to understand and be able to execute the PHP_FUNCTION(hello_world). Finally he shows how to make the extension to install it, add it to your php.ini file as a shared module and re-run the test.

tagged: helloworld extension tutorial example simple php7

Link: https://zando.io/writing-a-hello-world-php-7-extension/

Laravel News:
Announcing Laravel Valet
May 06, 2016 @ 09:46:28

The Laravel News site Eric Barnes has a post about the latest addition to the Laravel ecosystem (that includes the framework, Envoyer and Homestead) - Laravel Valet.

Laravel Valet is the next generation development environment for Mac minimalists. No Vagrant, No Apache, No Nginx, No /etc/hosts file. “I wanted to have the convenience of php artisan serve without ever having to run php artisan serve“, Taylor said when asked why he created it.

Valet works by hooking into your Mac’s built-in PHP server then it utilizes DnsMasq to proxy all requests to the .dev TLD to sites on your local machine.

The post links to the official documentation and an article he's written up with a "first look" at the new tool.

tagged: laravel valet tool setup configure website simple opinionated

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/05/announcing-laravel-valet/

Edd Mann:
Mapping, Filtering and Reducing in PHP
Mar 03, 2016 @ 09:28:27

Edd Mann has a post to his site talking about the use of things like "map" and "reduce" in his own development and how to use it in PHP to help reduce data sets and filter them based on certain criteria.

Over the past couple of years I have transitioned from boilerplate-heavy, imperative code, to begin using the more intuitive map, filter and reduce higher-order functions. In this article I hope to highlight the transformation that occurs, along with simplification, when moving away from the imperative and onto the declarative. We shall be performing a simple process which transforms a collection of user entries into a filtered collection of their names. Although trivial in nature, it is a great place to highlight the power of the paradigm shift.

He starts with a simple array of data: a set of users with their respective IDs and names. He shows a typical approach, using a method that loops through the data to find only the "name" values. He then shows an alternative that makes use of PHP's own array_filter and array_reduce functions to perform the same operation with just a bit more internal handling.

tagged: filter reduce array arrayfilter arrayreduce example simple

Link: http://eddmann.com/posts/mapping-filtering-and-reducing-in-php/

Michelangelo van Dam:
PHP arrays - simple operations
Jan 06, 2016 @ 09:13:29

Michelangelo van Dam continues his series on some of the basics of PHP with another look at arrays (started in this article).

Like all things in life, we need to start with simple things. So, in order to understand what arrays are in PHP, we need to take a look at the PHP manual to read what it is all about. [...] The thing with PHP is that an array is probably one of the most used data structures in web applications build with PHP and used for a wide variety of purposes.

He covers the basics of:

  • storing multiple values in an array and pushing additional values onto the end
  • removing the last item added to the array
  • pulling the first element off of the array

In his next article, he plans on expanding this introduction to arrays by looking at associative arrays.

tagged: array introduction simple tutorial multiple shift pop

Link: http://www.dragonbe.com/2016/01/php-arrays-simple-operations.html

Hart KT:
Custom Events in Symfony2 Bundle
Oct 12, 2015 @ 11:10:58

Hari KT has a quick tutorial posted to his site showing you how to use custom events in Symfony bundles from start to finish.

In this tutorial we will create a custom event for symfony2 bundle. Assuming you have downloaded the symfony-standard distribution to play.

He starts by creating a simple bundle (HktEventBundle) and building out the matching event class, extending the base Symfony EventDispatcherEvent. He then shows how to dispatch a simple event from a controller, triggering a html.event.page_viewed event when the request is made to this default controller. He matches this with a listener that subscribes to the event (including a handler method) and the changes you'll need to make to your configuration to wire them all together.

tagged: symfony2 bundle custom event simple tutorial introduction

Link: http://harikt.com/blog/2015/10/11/custom-events-in-symfony2-bundle/

KnP University:
Introducing Guard: Symfony Security with a Smile
Jul 14, 2015 @ 09:15:05

The KNP University site has a post that talks about a new library they've created (and matching tutorial series) about an easier method to handle authentication in your Symfony applications: Guard.

Symfony’s authorization system - the stuff related to voters and roles - is awesome. It’s simple, it kicks butt, and it’s one of my favorite things, just behind fresh-baked cookies.

But then there’s that other part: authentication. This is how you login: maybe with a form or via OAuth, like Facebook login. This part is probably the single worst part of Symfony. It’s over-engineered, hard to customize and no fun to work with. [...] This problem was screaming for a solution. If we could make Symfony’s authentication system simple and fun, the whole security system would go from a pain, to a powerful tool.

The library they've created, Guard centralizes the authentication handling into one place (via an interface) and makes the basics of authentication handling simpler. In their tutorial they walk you through the use of Guard as a part of a bundle complete with examples of login form and API token authentication handling. He ends the post with a quick comment about a "secret goal" he has to try to have Guard included in symfony itself.

tagged: guard symfony authentication library bundle tutorial simple

Link: http://knpuniversity.com/blog/guard-authentication

Luciano Mammino:
Symfony security: authentication made simple (well, maybe!)
Jun 04, 2015 @ 10:36:41

Luciano Mammino has a quick post to his site with information that tries to help make Symfony authentication simple (well, maybe).

The Symfony2 security component has the fame of being one of the most complex in the framework. I tend to believe that's partially true, not because the component is really that complex, but because there are (really) a lot of concepts involved and it may be difficult to understand them all at once and have a clear vision as a whole.

[...] Going back to the Symfony2 security component, the point is that I found out difficult at first glance to get a clear idea of what is going on behind the scenes and what I need to write to create a custom authentication mechanism. So in this post I will try to collect few interesting resources that helped me understanding it better and a graph I drawn to resume what I learned.

He provides a good list to some of the other resources that helped him along the way including several blog posts and links to the Symfony "cookbooks" about creating custom providers. He also shares a graph showing the full flow of the Symfony authentication process including commentary about each step.

tagged: symfony authentication simple resources graph flow provider

Link: http://loige.co/symfony-security-authentication-made-simple/

PMG Blog:
Symfony from Scratch
May 21, 2015 @ 08:41:15

In the latest post to the PMG blog Chris Davis shows us how to create a Symfony application from scratch, that is without using the Symfony Standard repository/skeleton application.

The end goal here is to have an application that will send a simple Hello World message. So we’re going to cover the core framework stuff, but save things like templating, database access, ORMs, and forms for later. The goal here to see how to scaffold a Symfony app to better understand why symfony standard does what it does and where to deviate. We’ll end up with an app that uses the Symfony 3 directory structure.

Starting with the smallest "composer.json" he can (just symfony/symfony) he walks through the creation of the application one step at a time:

  • The Application Kernel
  • Handling Web Requests
  • What’s in a Bundle?
  • Stepping into Configuration
  • AppBundle
  • Hello, World

The end result is a simple page outputting a "Hello, World" message, but it gives you a good foundation to work from and understanding of the simplest pieces needed to make a Symfony application.

tagged: symfony scratch introduction simple application standard

Link: https://www.pmg.com/blog/symfony-from-scratch/