News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 02.01.2015
February 01, 2015 @ 08:09:47

Recent releases from the Packagist:
0 comments voice your opinion now!



Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 01.31.2015
January 31, 2015 @ 08:08:23

Recent releases from the Packagist:
0 comments voice your opinion now!



Piotr Pasich:
ClassManager - You shall not pass
January 30, 2015 @ 11:42:55

Piotr Pasich has shared some thoughts on naming in his latest post to his site today. In it he talks about one of the "hardest things in computer science" (naming things) and makes some recommendations to help you make naming in your code more effective.

Precise names for classes is notoriously difficult. Done right, it makes code more self-documenting and provides a vocabulary for reasoning about code at a higher level of abstraction. There are a couple simple tips&tricks to make the names more readable: do not abbreviate, do not add any extra informations (underscore, type), avoid single letter prefixes, etc etc.

But what if you already know and use those rules and you still want to improve naming in your code? I assume that you care, you're not selfish and you think about elses when you write the code. You ask one of the most important question to yourself, during architecture implementation - how the fellow sitting next to will behave while reading the code.

He's broken up the remainder of the post into different sections, each with a high level recommendation and some follow up description:

  • Ask somebody else
  • Does it have a single responsibility you can name?
  • Simple Superclass Name
  • Qualified Subclass Name
  • Adding 'Interface' word

He ends with a few names to avoid (like *Manager, *Helper or *Handler) to help prevent ambiguity. He reinforces providing meaning in your naming and making it easier for others to understand what's going on.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
classmanager naming opinion recommendation avoid meaning

Link: http://piotrpasich.com/classmanager-you-shall-not-pass/

Laravel News:
Easy Image Processing in Laravel with Glide
January 30, 2015 @ 10:06:41

On the Laravel News site there's a new post sharing a video tutorial of how to use the Glide image handling library with your Laravel-based application.

Glide is a new package by Jonathan Reinink which is an on-demand image manipulation library. In this video he shows you how to set it up and the basic usage in Laravel 5.

In the tutorial Jonathan walks you through an introduction to the library and how it wraps around the Intervention image handling. He creates a basic application that, when an image endpoint is called, output the image with any given configuration options (like height and width). Glide is one of many packages making up The PHP League.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
laravel image processing glide library thephpleague screencast video

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2015/01/using-glide-laravel/

Michael Kimsal:
Purpose of Benchmarking Framework Speed
January 30, 2015 @ 09:53:57

In his new post Michael Kimsal shares some of his thoughts about framework benchmarking especially in the context of speed.

I've followed the techempower benchmarks, and every now and then I check out benchmarks of various projects (usually PHP) to see what the relative state of things are. Inevitably, someone points out that "these aren't testing anything 'real world' - they're useless!". Usually it's from someone who's favorite framework has 'lost'. I used to think along the same lines; namely that "hello world" benchmarks don't measure anything useful. I don't hold quite the same position anymore, and I'll explain why.

He goes on to talk about the purpose of using a framework and what kind of functionality they should provide. The usefulness of a framework is measured in what tools it provides and how easy it makes them to use. Benchmarks are only about speed, performance and overhead.

What those benchmark results are telling you is "this is about the fastest this framework's request cycle can be invoked while doing essentially nothing". [...] These benchmarks are largely about establishing that baseline expectation of performance. I'd say that they're not always necessarily presented that way, but this is largely the fault of the readers.

He refutes some of the common arguments about increasing performance of an application using a framework (like "just throw hardware at it"). He points out that, even with other improvements, it may come to a point where your framework of choice has become too slow and you need to move on. Think about maintainability too, though, and what you're switching from or to when considering making a move.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
benchmark framework speed purpose opinion feature maintainability scalability

Link: http://michaelkimsal.com/blog/purpose-of-framework-benchmarking-speed/

Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 01.30.2015
January 30, 2015 @ 08:08:07

Recent releases from the Packagist:
0 comments voice your opinion now!




Three Devs & A Maybe Podcast:
Episode #56 The SOLID Podcast
January 29, 2015 @ 12:20:03

In the latest show from the Three Devs & A Maybe podcast hosts Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann talk about a wide range of topics with a focus on the SOLID development principles.

This week we have a three developer podcast with discussion on a host of topics. We kick off with how Fraser has enjoyed building his first bonus slot game, written entirely in JavaScript and HTML5. Preprocessors are a huge part of the JavaScript ecosystem at this time, with so many to choose from we discuss a couple of the more popular ones. This leads on to Photoshop discussion, ReactJS, the cool features present in ES6 and how you can use them today with transpilers. Following this we move on to the SOLID principles, the overuse of inheritance, technical debt and the concept of Over-DRY vs. Software Value. This then takes us on to a strange 'rubber duck' example Edd conjured up to help try and explain the Liskov substitution and Interface segregation principles. Finally, we discuss Edd's media server setup and how he has got it to a staged that he is finally happy with it.

Other topics include things like:

You can listen to the latest show either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 of the episode. Also, be sure to subscribe to their feed of you enjoy the show!

0 comments voice your opinion now!
threedevsandamaybe podcast ep56 solid development principles

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/the-solid-podcast/

Community News:
Announcing the Pacific Northwest PHP Conference (Seattle, WA)
January 29, 2015 @ 11:53:08

The Seattle PHP User Group has decided to follow along with the example set by many other PHP user groups in the past several years. They have officially announced the Pacific Northwest PHP Conference and a Kickstarter campaign to help raise the funding to help make it a reality.

The Seattle PHP User Group (SeaPHP) has been around for over 10 years. We love PHP, and we want to build up our local PHP community even further by hosting a PHP developer conference here in Seattle-the technology hub of the Pacific Northwest and cloud computing capital of the world. We invite PHP developers everywhere, and of all skill levels, to come learn, network, and hack together with us in the Emerald City at the first Pacific Northwest PHP Conference (PNWPHP).

The goal of the campaign is to raise some of the initial funding needed to generate more interest for the event, presell tickets and even attract sponsors. The conference itself is planned for September 11th and 12th of 2015 there in Seattle, Washington at the Impact Hub coworking space. If you'd like more information about the conference and updates as they come along, be sure to subscribe to their mailing list and consider helping the PHP conference community grow and contribute today!

0 comments voice your opinion now!
kickstarter campaign pacific northwest conference pnwphp15 contribute

Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/seattlephp/pacific-northwest-php-conference-pnwphp

Voices of the ElePHPant:
Interview with Jacob Mather
January 29, 2015 @ 10:41:29

The Voices of the ElePHPant podcast has posted their latest episode in their interviews with members of the PHP community. In this latest show host Cal Evans talks with Jacob Mather, a co-organizer of the San Francisco PHP Meetup group.

They talk some about Jacob's more recent migration into the world of devops and what he enjoys about it. He talks about the work he does to make sure the developers don't have to worry as much about the environment. They also talk about his involvement in the SF.PHP user group and some of the exciting things they're doing.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the interview, be sure to subscribe to their feed.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
voicesoftheelephpant community interview jacobmather sfphp usergroup

Link: http://voicesoftheelephpant.com/2015/01/28/interview-with-jacob-mather/


Community Events





Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


language api interview list introduction composer opinion tool framework series community release conference configure symfony laravel voicesoftheelephpant unittest podcast version

All content copyright, 2015 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework