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Rob Allen:
Slim's route cache file
May 31, 2017 @ 09:35:15

In a new post to his site Rob Allen talks about how you can speed up the routing in your Slim framework based application using the route cache file.

When you have a lot of routes, that have parameters, consider using the router's cache file to speed up performance.

To do this, you set the routerCacheFile setting to a valid file name. The next time the app is run, then the file is created which contains an associative array with data that means that the router doesn't need to recompile the regular expressions that it uses.

He gives an example of how to enable the setting and makes the recommendation that it's only used in production. He includes a simple example that defines "25 groups, each with 4000 routes, each of which has a placeholder parameter with a constraint." The first run on a route responds in 2.7 seconds but, once the cache file is created, it drops down to just 263 milliseconds - a major improvement.

tagged: slim route cache file tutorial example performance

Link: https://akrabat.com/slims-route-cache-file/

Zend Framework Blog:
Caching middleware with Expressive
Apr 19, 2017 @ 12:12:32

On the Zend Framework blog Enrico Zimuel has posted a tutorial showing you how to use middleware caching in Zend Expressive to help increase the overall performance of your application.

Performance is one of the key feature for web application. Using a middleware architecture makes it very simple to implement a caching system in PHP.

The general idea is to store the response output of a URL in a file (or in memory, using memcached) and use it for subsequent requests. In this way we can bypass the execution of the previous middlewares starting from the second request.

Of course, this technique can only be applied for static contents, that does not require update for each HTTP request.

He shows how to implement the "cachable" middleware, starting with a version that caches the return content based on the URL requested. He then shows how to configure the caching system to specify settings like path, lifetime and the enabled/disabled state. This is stored as a PHP configuration where the autoloader can get to it and the class as a dependency on the middleware itself.

tagged: cache middleware output zendexpressive tutorial response content

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-04-19-caching-middleware.html

Laravel News:
Utilizing Laravel’s Cache with Query Params
Apr 04, 2017 @ 09:27:53

On the Laravel News site there's a quick tutorial posted showing you how to use Laravel's query cache with query params to help increase the performance of your application by caching query responses.

Laravel provides a very intuitive and useful means of caching the responses of your projects, whatever your project is (RESTful API, Web Platform, etc.). In general, Laravel can store in the cache system whatever data you send (HTML, JSON, collections, Eloquent instances, and similar) accordingly with a provided expiration time.

[...] The question here is “How does Laravel determine when to store data?”

They give an example of saving a "remember" key value to the cache manually using the "remember" method on the Cache facade. He then talks about what happens internally when the "remember" method is called to know if the data was previously cached. It then moves into the caching of data based on URL values and how query params would confuse things and not provide much benefit to the caching. Thanks to some internal handling the caching ignores the query params and returns the same data as before. This is an issue if you want the updated data but is relatively easily solved with a bit of code to sort the params and normalize the URL being used as the "remember" key.

tagged: laravel cache query params tutorial sort normalize

Link: https://laravel-news.com/cache-query-params

Laravel News:
Route improvements are coming to Laravel 5.4
Dec 07, 2016 @ 10:12:31

The Laravel News site has a quick new post about some routing improvements that are coming in the next larger release of the framework , Laravel v5.4:

As Laravel 5.4 development continues, two new improvements are coming to your routes, better route caching for large applications and fluently registering routes.

The route caching updates will help performance with larger applications, reducing the parsing time required to locate and push a request to the right location. The "fluent" route improvements basically allow for the definition of some things, like middleware or route names, as a part of the route definition rather than after the fact. Examples of this are included in the post.

tagged: laravel routing improvement v54 cache fluent registration

Link: https://laravel-news.com/route-improvements

Matt Stauffer:
The new cache() global helper in Laravel 5.3
Jul 08, 2016 @ 11:11:28

Matt Stauffer has continued his series covering some of the new features in Laravel v5.3 with this look at the cache helper, a new feature introduced to help make working with your cached data easier.

As I was writing my book I noticed a pattern in the global helper functions like session() and, in some ways, cookie(). There are three primary functions that they can perform: get a value, put a value, or return an instance of their backing service.

[...] I mentioned that it seems like there should be a cache() helper, and before I could even think much more about it, Jeffrey (Way) had already written one up. So! Behold! The global cache() helper, new in Laravel 5.3.

He includes code samples showing the helper in action. It's a simplified helper so the main functionality is basically the same as the session and cookie helpers: read, write and return an instance of the CacheManager.

tagged: cache global helper laravel cachemanager overview

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/the-new-cache-global-helper-in-laravel-5-3

Symfony Finland:
Cache enhancements in Symfony 3.1 and 3.2: PSR-6 and tag invalidation
Jun 23, 2016 @ 09:17:04

On the Symfony Finland site there's a post talking about caching enhancements in Symfony 3.1 & 3.2 using the PSR-6 structure as defined by the PHP-FIG standard.

Symfony 3.1 was the first version of the new Symfony3 family to offer new features. The first 3.0 release had feature parity with the last of the Symfony2 series. Symfony 3.1 was launched in May 2016, with a moderate list of added individual features, but one that was a big step in terms of caching: [an] implementation of the cache PSR (PSR-6). The new component is also automatically wired in FrameworkBundle and Symfony Standard Edition."

He talks about how following the PSR-6 standard allows for caching tools to only need to worry about the underlying implementation, not the interface. The post also talks about a new feature coming in Symfony 3.2 around caching: cache tagging. This allows you to "link" cache entries together using tags as related items. One potential use of this is invalidating cache records linked to a specific resource or page in the application without having to check each entry.

tagged: symfony cache invalidation tagging psr6 phpfig

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/cache-enhancements-in-symfony-3-1-and-3-2-psr-6-and-tag-invalidation

Liip Blog:
Let’s debug in Drupal 8 !
Jun 20, 2016 @ 09:23:37

In a new post to the Liip blog Karine Chor shares some helpful Drupal 8 debugging tips and things you can do to determine what you code is doing "under the covers".

It has been nearly 7 months since Drupal 8 first release and as a developer, I am still in the learning process. It can be hard sometimes to know what is going wrong with your code and how to solve it. I will tell you about few things to know on how to develop and debug Drupal 8 projects and continue learning, learning and learning !

Her tips cover topics like:

  • Disabling cache
  • Displaying errors
  • Creating log messages
  • Debugging Twig templates
  • Profiling pages

The post ends with a section covering use of the the Drupal command line tool to provide even more real-time debugging functionality.

tagged: debugging drupal8 commandline cache error log twig profiler tutorial

Link: https://blog.liip.ch/archive/2016/06/20/lets-debug-drupal-8.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
We’re Building a Marvel Catalog Reader! Avengers, Assemble!
May 16, 2016 @ 13:23:08

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've shared a tutorial covering the construction of a Marvel Catalog Reader that hooks in to the Marvel API for its data.

In this tutorial, we’re going to take a look at the Marvel API, a tool provided by Marvel for developers to get access to the 70-plus years of Marvel comics data. First, we’ll walk through the steps in which one can acquire the keys needed to make requests to the API. Then, we’ll look at the tools we can use to test out the API. Finally, we’re going to build a website that uses the API.

They start out on the API side of things, showing you how to sign up for an account, get your token information and include a note about using the API (rate limiting and referencing the source of the images). There's a mention and example of working with the interactive API documentation and the first part of the code you'll need to make the connection. They then get into the construction of the site itself using the Laravel framework and a simple caching command. This is used to store the results from a query made via a Guzzle client. The focus then shifts to the frontend where they create the HomeController and define both the main endpoint and two others: one for viewing a specific comic and the other for the character listing. The tutorial continues on showing you how to handle the (paginated) responses from each of the calls and push the results into a cache record. Finally, they create the matching views of the API query results and some example screenshots of the results.

tagged: marvel api tutorial laravel frontend cache reader guzzle

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/were-building-a-marvel-catalog-reader-avengers-assemble/

Loïc Faugeron:
Super Speed Symfony - nginx
Apr 20, 2016 @ 10:48:49

Loïc Faugeron has continued his series about speeding up Symfony applications and getting the best overall performance you can. In this new post he gets into more detail about tuning a Nginx web server (with PHP-FPM) and the web server's own caching features.

HTTP frameworks, such as Symfony, allow us to build applications that have the potential to achieve Super Speed.

We've already seen a first way to do so (by turning it into a HTTP server), another way would be to put a reverse proxy in front of it. In this article we'll take a Symfony application and demonstrate how to do so using nginx.

He starts by helping you get Nginx and PHP-FPM all set up and running on a Unix-based system (installed via apt-get). He provides a simple configuration including the user to run as and a virtual host for the application. There's a few command line checks to ensure it's working correctly and a bit of benchmarking as a baseline for the performance testing later. He then gets to the caching functionality and gives some of the basics on how it works inside of Nginx itself. He includes a basic caching configuration (caching to files) and adding this to the already created virtual host. Finally he includes sample Symfony code to send the "Cache-Control" header with every request and runs the benchmarks again (resulting in about 140x faster than without the cache).

tagged: tutorial nginx performance symfony speed phpfpm setup configuration cache cachecontrol

Link: https://gnugat.github.io/2016/04/20/super-speed-sf-nginx.html

Nginx.com:
Maximizing PHP 7 Performance with NGINX, Part I: Web Serving and Caching
Feb 29, 2016 @ 13:55:10

On the Nginx.com site they've posted the first part of a series showing you how to maximize your performance with PHP 7 and this already speedy web server.

PHP is the most popular way to create a server-side Web application, with roughly 80% market share. (ASP.net is a distant second, and Java an even more distant third.) [...] Now the PHP team is releasing a new version, PHP 7 – more than a decade after the introduction of PHP 5. During this time, usage of the web and the demands on websites have both increased exponentially.

[...] This blog post is the first in a two-part series about maximizing the performance of your websites that use PHP 7. Here we focus on upgrading to PHP 7, implementing open source NGINX or NGINX Plus as your web server software, rewriting URLs (necessary for requests to be handled properly), caching static files, and caching dynamic files (also called application caching or microcaching).

They start by looking at why "PHP hits a wall" in its execution in high load situations, stepping through the process it follows to handle each request. They also share some of the common ways PHP developers have combatted these issues including more hardware, better server software and multi-server setups. They then get into the actual tips themselves:

  • Tip 1. Upgrade to PHP 7
  • Tip 2. Choose Open Source NGINX or NGINX Plus
  • Tip 3. Convert Apache Configuration to NGINX Syntax
  • Tip 4. Implement Static File Caching
  • Tip 5. Implement Microcaching

For each tip there's a summary with more information on why they make the suggestion and, for some, how to make the transition happen. In the next part of the series they'll get into reverse proxy servers and a multi-server Nginx implementation to boost performance even more.

tagged: performance php7 nginx series part1 maximize tutorial static cache apache conversion

Link: https://www.nginx.com/blog/maximizing-php-7-performance-with-nginx-part-i-web-serving-and-caching/