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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introduction to Kirby CMS
April 28, 2014 @ 13:48:31

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new article introducing you to Kirby, a database-less content management system that's all file based.

Kirby is a lightweight CMS that probably fits somewhere between feature-rich platforms such as Drupal, and static site generators such as Jekyll. What makes Kirby quite different to most CMS's - and closer to Jekyll in the process - is that it has no database. Instead, everything is stored as files; some for configuration, some for content - all in addition to the usual template files, partials and plugins. In this article I'm going to take a look at Kirby, demonstrate how to use it, and assess some of its strengths and weaknesses.

He walks you through the download and installation process and provides a general overview of the structure of the application and how it works. He gets into the specifics of theming the site to match your own look and feel, shows you how to use "kirbytext", a custom extension of Markdown. He also briefly covers plugins, the main panel and some of the pros and cons of using the system.

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kirby cms content management system file

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introduction-kirby-cms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Selling Downloads with Stripe and Laravel
October 24, 2013 @ 12:17:30

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted showing you how to integrate Laravel and Stripe to make a simple system for selling downloads of software. Stripe is a developer friendly, easy to use payment system that helps you take and manage payments.

Digital goods are an increasingly valuable commodity. [...] In this article I'll show how you can implement a simple store selling digital goods using PHP along with Stripe, a payment provider who aims to make it easier than ever to take online payments since you don't need to set up special merchant accounts or deal with complex payment gateways.

He points you to the Stripe site to set up an account before getting started. With that in hand, They start in on the Laravel setup and project creation. He helps you make a "downloads" table to handle path to the file and price. Also included are the model for the Downloads and a "seeder" with some fixture data to work with. From there he shows how to make a simple home page and a "buy" page with a form for the payment information. The Stripe javascript library is then integrated and the response is handled. If it's a success, the user is then forwarded to another endpoint to download the file they paid for.

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download stripe laravel tutorial payment system

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/selling-downloads-stripe-laravel/

Kevin Schroeder:
More - The file system is slow
September 30, 2013 @ 10:44:29

As a follow-up to his previous article about the (minimal) overhead from logging, Kevin Schroeder has this new post focusing on the common belief that writing to the file system is the slowest method.

I had a conversation the other day by a person I respect (I respect any PHP developer who knows how to use strace) about the cost of file IO. My assertion has been, and has been for a long time, that file IO is not the boogeyman that it is claimed to be. So I decided to test a cross between those two posts.

His test was to write one million log records to two different sources - the normal physical file system, a RAM drive - one run with a file handle that's left open and the other with a new handle each time. He shows how he made the RAM drive and the PHP he used for the test (running in a VM). He graphs out the results with some interesting results...but you'll have to read the post for that.

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file system slow write log overhead benchmark ramdisk graph

Link: http://www.eschrade.com/page/more-on-the-file-system-is-slow/

PHPMaster.com:
PHP and the i, Part 1
January 17, 2013 @ 13:50:19

On PHPMaster.com there's a new article that looks at running PHP on a specific environment and some of the considerations the author had to make - using PHP on IBM i.

We've talked about a lot of weird things so far on PHPMaster (well, at least I think some of them are weird), but this may take the cake. In this series I want to talk to you about PHP - and the IBM I. That's right, the IBM i, formerly known as System i and before that as the AS/400. Let's start by dispelling the myth that the i is dinosaur; it's actually a very wonderful machine, and there are lot of opportunities for brave PHP programmers who venture into this realm.

He starts off with "the truth" about the IBM i and some of the features it brings to the table - total system integration, scalability, etc. He talks some about the current GUI the system uses, functionality RPG provides, and some concepts you'll need to think about before getting into PHP on the IBM I.

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ibmi systemi as400 system platform introduction


Paul Jones:
New Aura System Release, Including Aura.Framework and Aura.Demo
December 19, 2012 @ 11:06:02

The Aura framework project has released a set of updates to several of their packages including the main Aura.Framework and Aura.Demo functionality.

Late last night we released version 1.0.0-beta4 of the full-stack system, which composes all the independent Aura packages into a coherent framework using the Aura.Framework package in a project skeleton. We have extracted the "hello world" portions into their own Aura.Demo package so that it can be removed or disabled when you begin your project. Download it and take it for a spin!

There's been a lot of talk recently about the Aura framework and its "less dependencies, more separate packages" approach to making the framework including these posts from Paul Jones and others.

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aura framework project system release demo application


DZone.com:
Two More Non-Mainstream Databases for PHP Apps
August 20, 2012 @ 08:48:19

New on Dzone.com today they've posted the third and final part of their series looking at lesser known databases systems you might want to use in your application. In this latest article they cover eXist DB and Hypertable.

Welcome to the third and final part of the series in which we look at five alternative databases you can use with PHP apps you might not have heard of. [...] In this final part of the series, we're going to finish up by looking at two outstanding, yet markedly different, databases: eXist DB and Hypertable. So let's get started.

As in the other two parts of the series, they include a brief overview of what each database is and some sample code showing it in use (and what you'll need to install to use it).

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mainstream database system existdb hypertable


Anthony Ferrara's Blog:
Building A Multi-Version Build System
July 09, 2012 @ 15:42:32

In this recent post Anthony Ferrara has a new post showing how he created a multi-version build system to make working with multiple PHP installs (different versions) simpler....with the help of Jenkins.

I've been using Jenkins to manage builds of my projects for a while now. This was fine for a while, but now that my projects need to support multiple versions of PHP, it left something to be desired. I wanted a system that could build against multiple versions of PHP. And more so, I wanted to be able to build against multiple compiles of the same version (different options, etc). This is how I built just such a system...

He gives an overview of the Jenkins system, the hardware and operating system that runs the server as well as examples of his "php-build" command to generate the different environments. He uses a modified version of the PHP template for Jenkins as a base.

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multiversion deployment jenkins build system


Henrik Bjørnskov's Blog:
Travis & Composer sitting in a tree K-I-S-S-I-N-G
November 18, 2011 @ 11:03:01

Henrik Bjørnskov has a quick new post today showing how to combine two powerful technologies into a simple, configurable autoload system in a Symfony Travis-CI build with Composer.

To integrate your project with travis the only thing necesarry is to have a .travis.yml file and a working PHPUnit test setup like http://github.com/simplethings/SimpleThingsFormExtraBundle. Where the Tests/vendors.php script is executed before the tests are perfomed. But it would be way cooler to just have Composer handle the autoloading and dependencies.

A sample .travis.yml file is included in the post (also here) as well as instructions for grabbing dependencies and including the autoload process in your application's bootstrap.

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composer travisci build system yml configuration tutorial


Script-Tutorials.com:
Creating Your Own Commenting System from Scratch
October 17, 2011 @ 11:30:02

Script-Tutorials.com has a new article posted today showing you how to combine PHP, some CSS, a dash of SQL and some HTML (oh, and jQuery) to create your own commenting system from scratch that could be used anywhere from a simple blog to a more complex social site.

Today I prepared new interesting article - I will tell how you can create own commenting system (AJAX) for your items (any units at your website) with PHP. For our demonstration - I prepared two SQL tables: first table will keep records of our items. It contain several fields: title, description, time of adding and comments count. Another table will keep records of comments. We will use jQuery too (for better interface behavior). One of features will spam protection (we can post no more than one comment every 10 minutes)!

The tutorial includes all of the code, markup and styling you'll need to make the system work. If you'd like to get right into the code you can download it as a package or you can try out their demo.

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commenting system tutorial html mysql jquery css demo


Sameer Borate's Blog:
Tail functionality in PHP
July 19, 2011 @ 10:16:41

Sameer Borate has posted an alternative to "tail" that you can use to find the last X number of lines in a log file you'd like to follow without having the overhead of parsing the entire file.

Frequently one needs to get the last few lines of some log files, whether php error logs or Apache logs. Most of these file sizes run into megabytes, which makes it difficult and time consuming to remotely open them using ftp. [...] The [example] is a simple but useful 'tail' implementation in PHP. I've encapsulated the tail function in a 'LogRead' class, which can be further enlarged by adding other useful log functions.

His code opens a file pointer to the requested log, grabs the file size and uses the fseek function to move the pointer to the line/location you've requested. Obviously, if the requested lines of data is large, it will still have some overhead, but this is a much better way for keeping track of the latest additions to a log. You can then use the "tail" method on the "LogRead" class to grab just the lines you want.

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tail system log file tutorial



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