Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

php[architect]:
Testing Your Drupal Site with Behat
Aug 11, 2016 @ 11:32:45

On the php[architect] site there's a new tutorial posted from Oscar Merida about testing Drupal sites with Behat, a popular PHP-based "Behavior Driven Development" testing tool to help ensure your application is performing correctly from the outside.

If automated testing is not already part of your development workflow, then it’s time to get started. Testing helps reduce uncertainty by ensuring that new features you add to your application do not break older features. Having confidence that your not breaking existing functionality reduces time spent hunting bugs or getting reports from clients by catching them earlier.

Unfortunately, testing still does not get the time and attention it needs when you’re under pressure to make a deadline or release a feature your clients have been asking for. [...] After reading all the theory, I only recently took the plunge myself. In this post, I’ll show you how to use Behat to test that your Drupal site is working properly.

He starts by listing some of the requirements you'll need to get started (packages installed via Composer) including the installation of a Drupal specific plugin to make testing these sites easier. From there he shows how to configure the Behat tool and write a simple feature to test the visiting of a certain page and looking for matching results. He also includes tips about testing with user authentication, using custom contexts and Selenium integration.

tagged: behat testing bdd tool tutorial drupal application introduction

Link: https://www.phparch.com/2016/08/testing-your-drupal-site-with-behat/

Joeri Timmermans:
Testing drag and drop with Behat and Guzzle
Feb 26, 2016 @ 12:28:58

Joeri Timmermans has posted a tutorial to his site showing how you can test drag-and-drop functionality with a combination of the Behat BDD testing tool and the Guzzle HTTP library.

As you could see in previous posts I'm working on a large application for Intracto where they want a lot of fancy visuals and this turned into a mess when it came to write behat tests. This post will help you test position moving with drag and drop.

In his case he was working with a chapter layout that allows for the rearranging of chapters to update their order. The process is then broken up into a few different steps:

  • Creating a new context feature for Behat (based on this example)
  • Making a custom action that makes it easier to move the chapter entries around by just providing positions
  • Calling the move in the Behat test itself

The tricky part here is that the actual test is made for the behavior but the behavior itself is making an API call to rearrange the pages. The test is making this same call and evaluating the result. It's not actually interacting with the page as you might be able to do with something like PhantomJs however.

tagged: testing draganddrop functionality guzzle behat api position chapter tutorial

Link: http://www.pix-art.be/post/testing-drag-and-drop-with-behat-and-guzzle

Antonios Pavlakis:
Having a go at creating a Behat 3 extension
Jan 15, 2016 @ 12:42:10

In this post to his site Antonios Pavlakis "has a go" at creating an extension for the Behat (v3) testing tool. Behat is a testing tool written in PHP that helps with behavior-driven testing as opposed to unit testing with a tool like PHPUnit.

Ever since I got accepted to do a tutorial on Test legacy apps with Behat at the PHPNW15 conference, I’ve been meaning to look into creating custom extensions for Behat. I didn’t have enough time to research into this while preparing for the tutorial, so left it in my todo list in Trello.

During the PHPNW15 long weekend (Friday - Monday), at some point over lunch I was at the table where Matt Brunt (@themattbrunt) and Ciaran McNulty (@ciaranmcnulty) were having a conversation about this and Ciaran said (paraphrasing) “In order to be able to write an extension, you really need to understand how Behat works.”

So a few months later, sleeves up and I went into my vendor/bin/behat and started looking (and poking) around.

After looking in to two current extensions he started to get a feel for what was needed and the pieces that made up an extension. He then gets into detail on each of these pieces and shares some code/configuration he used to create the extension.

tagged: behat testing extension tutorial example behat3

Link: http://pavlakis.info/php/23-having-a-go-at-creating-a-behat-3-extension

Lakion Blog:
How we sped up Sylius' Behat suite with Blackfire
Dec 01, 2015 @ 12:08:57

On the Lakion blog there's a recent post sharing how they used the Blackfire.io profiling service to [speed up their application's tests] (Behat)(http://lakion.com/blog/how-did-we-speed-up-sylius-behat-suite-with-blackfire) and find the "pain points" to fix.

Feedback time is one of the most crucial factors during development and the red - green - refactor cycle. In case of Sylius, the full build used to take two and a half hour, including 55 minutes for only PHP 5.6 jobs. Waiting so long for feedback is not an option for a project of this size and with so many active contributors. As much as I am Xdebug fan, I have never really used it for profiling - the snapshots generation was slowing down the profiled script significantly and resulted in monstrous files, which weren't easy to read.

Half a year after I have first heard of blackfire.io I decided to give it a try. It resulted in a series of pull requests that speeds up Sylius test suites 6 times and reduces memory usage to one tenth.

They go through some of the major bottlenecks that the service helped them locate including:

  • an issue with the login process and their role evaluation handling
  • problems with time spent doing router initialization
  • Doctrine performance issues running it without a class metadata cache

For each item they describe what the service was reporting and how they corrected it in the application. Most of the changes were relatively small, fortunately. They also link to the results from before and after the changes so you can see the difference. As their environment is Symfony-based they end the post with some other helpful Symfony tips to getting the most out of your application and enhancing its performance in a few simple ways.

tagged: blackfireio behat test suite performance improvement profiling

Link: http://lakion.com/blog/how-did-we-speed-up-sylius-behat-suite-with-blackfire

Semaphore CI Blog:
Getting Started with BDD in Laravel
Aug 05, 2015 @ 09:17:43

Bruno Skvorc has written up a tutorial on the Semaphore-CI blog showing you how to get started with behavior-driven development in Laravel applications. He makes use of the Behat and PHPSpec libraries to write and execute the tests.

For many developers BDD is a complicated subject, and getting started with it the right way often does not come easy - especially when you need to implement it into an existing framework. This tutorial aims to help you get a BDD-powered Laravel project up and running in very little time, introducing you to the basic concepts and workflow you'll need to proceed on your own. We'll be installing and using Behat and PhpSpec.

He walks you through the process of getting everything you need installed: a simple Laravel application and Behat (also requiring a bit of setup to make it "play nice" with Laravel). He initializes the Behat directory and explains the concept of "context" and how to configure your Behat installation. He then gets into writing the features, creating a basic test that checks the main page of the Laravel application for the phrase "Laravel 5". A bit of additional PHP code is required to make the tests work (included) and the result is a passing test, executed with just a behat command.

The second half of the article is about PHPSpec, showing how it can be used as a sort of replacement for PHPUnit with a bit more readable syntax. He shows how to write a simple test against an object. Finally, he shows how to combine the powers of Behat and PHPSpec into a single method of testing, using PHPSpec behind the scenes in the Behat context to help with testing assertions.

tagged: phpunit phpspec testing behaviordriven behat bdd introduction tutorial

Link: https://semaphoreci.com/community/tutorials/getting-started-with-bdd-in-laravel

Amine Matmati:
Testing PDF content with PHP and Behat
Jul 31, 2015 @ 13:49:52

In this post to his site Amine Matmati shows you how to use Behat (with a bit of additional PHP) to test the contents of a rendered PDF file.

If you have a PDF generation functionality in your app, and since most of the libraries out there build the PDF content in an internal structure before outputting it to the file system (FPDF, TCPDF). A good way to write a test for it is to test the output just before the rendering process.

Recently however, and due to this process being a total pain in the ass, people switched to using tools like wkhtmltopdf or some of its PHP wrappers (phpwkhtmltopdf, snappy) that let you build your pages in html/css and use a browser engine to render the PDF for you, and while this technique is a lot more developer friendly, you loose control over the building process.

He shows how to get all of the required software installed including the smalot/pdfparser library used to read in the contents of the PDF file. He initializes a Behat test directory and writes a simple test, checking for a string of some "Lorem ipsum" text in the document's title and that it contains only one page. Some additional methods have to be created to integrate the PDF parsing and string location/page counting and code is included for each. When all the pieces are put in place, executing the test passes for both checks. You can find the code for the tutorial in this repository that also includes two sample PDFs to work with.

tagged: integration test behat contents string pages tutorial

Link: http://matmati.net/testing-pdf-with-behat-and-php

Marc Morera:
Behat and Data-test
Apr 27, 2015 @ 09:55:08

In a new post Marc Morera makes a suggestion for a testing practice to add to the use of the popular BDD PHP testing framework Behat - a "data-test" option to help with decoupling the tests from implementation.

Tests should be as robust as possible. I think you will agree with me with that phrase. If your tests are too coupled with your implementation, a simple modification of your code will need the modification of your tests, and that’s so annoying, right? [...] My question is… should the frontend of your website be aware of the how your Behat tests are built? In my opinion, nope. Your tests should live in a simple layout on top of your application, emulating some cases and ensuring that your users will be able to do what they should be able to.

He points out the main problem with the current testing methods, mainly that the real issue is in the hard-wiring of the test functionality to the name/id/type of the interface elements. He also brings up the aspect of translations and ensuring that your tests take into account that the text may not always be in English. He also mentions Symfony forms and how they define their own structure and naming, not necessarily what you manually generate. He instead proposes a "data-test" property that could be added to elements both indicating that they're used by the testing process and can help in locating the elements during the testing process.

tagged: behat bdd datatest property markup testing method opinion

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2015/04/25/behat-and-data-test/

Full Stack Radio:
15: Everzet - Classicist and Mockist TDD
Apr 22, 2015 @ 08:23:49

The latest episode of the Full Stack Radio podcast, episode #15, features a focus on Behat (the PHP BDD testing tool) and an interview with its creator Konstantin Kudryashov, aka everzet.

In this episode, Adam talks to Konstantin Kudryashov, creator of Behat and BDD Practice Manager at Inviqa. Konstantin and Adam talk about the schools of TDD, how to use test doubles effectively, and common challenges people face when trying to learn TDD.

They talk about several other subjects besides just BDD too including the book "Test Driven Development: By Example" and Ian Cooper's talk "TDD: Where did it all go wrong?". You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by grabbing the mp3. If you like the episode and want to hear more, be sure to subscribe to their feed too!

tagged: fullstackradio konstantinkudryashov podcast ep15 classicst mockist tdd bdd behat

Link: http://fullstackradio.com/episodes/15/

Laracasts:
Laravel 5 and Behat: BFFs
Jan 13, 2015 @ 10:35:27

The Laracasts site has a new screencast posted showing you how to integrate Behat with Laravel for functional testing of your application. Behat is an automated testing tool, written in PHP, that's made for frontend functional tests rather than backend, unit tests

It has always been a little tricky to hook Behat into Laravel. But, luckily, that's no longer the case. In this lesson, from scratch, we'll install both Laravel 5 and Behat 3, and then learn about using a special extension to make working with the two that much easier. In a follow-up lesson, we'll move on to discussing general BDD, and best practices for constructing your feature files.

You can watch the screencast on the Laracasts site and you can find out more about Behat from its documentation.

tagged: laracast laravel behat functional testing extension tutorial screencast

Link: https://laracasts.com/lessons/laravel-5-and-behat-bffs

NetTuts.com:
Laravel, BDD and You: The First Feature
Nov 26, 2014 @ 12:19:37

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their "Laravel, BDD and You" series (part one is here) building on their introduction in part one and building a first feature (what BDD tools call their tests).

In the second part of this series called Laravel, BDD and You, we will start describing and building our first feature using Behat and PhpSpec. In the last article we got everything set up and saw how easily we can interact with Laravel in our Behat scenarios. [...] In short, we are going to use the same .feature to design both our core domain and our user interface. I have often felt that I had a lot of duplication in my features in my acceptance/functional and integration suites. When I read everzet's suggestion about using the same feature for multiple contexts, it all clicked for me and I believe it is the way to go.

He starts in with the creation of the first feature - a simple "welcome" test that evaluates the main Laravel start page. He uses this example to set up a Laravel trait that can be reused in other parts of the testing and how to use it in a Feature Context file. He then starts to create the tests for the sample time tracking application started in part one. He gives an example of the feature file's contents, the result from its execution and the "small refactors" that it will suggest to add functionality to the feature file. With this skeleton in place, he then fleshes out the test to make it actually work with the requests. He walks through each function and provides the code needed for both the test and other tools/objects they need.

tagged: laravel tutorial bdd feature series part2 testing behat phpspec

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/laravel-bdd-and-you-the-first-feature--cms-22486