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PHPBuilder.com:
Add Custom Components to Your PHP Development with PRADO
Jun 11, 2010 @ 11:19:22

Continuing on with their look at the PRADO framework, PHPBuilder.com has published this new tutorial about adding in custom components to a PRADO-based application.

To develop PRADO Web applications, you instantiate pre-built and application-specific component types, configure them by setting their properties, respond to their events by writing handler functions, and compose them into application tasks. Using a few examples from a demo application, this article demonstrates how to implement custom components into your PHP applications using PRADO.

Their example comes in the form of a login form that uses some of the basic form helpers that come with the framework including textarea generation, input validation, layout helpers and headers/footers.

tagged: custom component prado framework tutorial

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PHPBuilder.com:
Meet PRADO, the Component-based PHP Development Framework
Jun 09, 2010 @ 08:41:12

On PHPBuilder.com today there's a new tutorial that introduces you to the PRADO framework and some of what it has to offer as another component-based tool (similar to how the Zend Framework is set up).

PRADO is a component-based and event-driven Web programming framework for PHP 5. A PRADO component represents a combination of a PHP class, an HTML template and a specification file (in XML). PRADO components are combined to form larger components or form complete PRADO pages. Developing PRADO Web applications involves instantiating pre-built and application-specific component types, configuring them by setting their properties, responding to their events by writing handler functions, and composing them into application tasks.

They walk you through the download and installation of the framework and include some sample scripts to show how it all works together. There's also an example of the optional application.xml file that lets you define different settings for your app, either application-wide or down to each module.

tagged: prado framework component introduction tutorial

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The Web Squeeze:
Using Prado - A PHP Framework
Apr 28, 2009 @ 12:54:18

On The Web Squeeze blog there's a recent post looking at a PHP framework that doesn't get mentioned that often (at least these days) - Prado. The post looks briefly at the framework at getting it set up for development.

This [word game] project was going to be slightly larger, and writing everything myself from scratch would have taken far too long. So I decided to use a PHP framework. PHP frameworks are a collection of code, meant to make your life easier and to aid you in the rapid development of dynamic websites. My choice fell on the Prado framework (see www.pradosoft.com).

He walks you through a first example script with both sides - controller to create/gather the content and the custom tag markup for it to inject the content into. He also includes a look at some of the Ajax support included with the framework. His example is the user clicking on a "Add to Cart" button to call the backend "onToCartClicked" method.

tagged: framework prado introduction example custom markup

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Douglas Brown's Blog:
Popular PHP Frameworks: What’s Your Fav?
Dec 19, 2008 @ 08:42:01

Douglas Brown is running a poll in a new post to his blog asking which of the six choices (of the major PHP frameworks) is your favorite PHP framework.

In a perfect world, I would suggest to learn them all! However, there are only 24 hours in a day, and prioritizing your PHP framework education might be a good idea. So above I added a poll that I plead to other PHP developers out there to vote on. Hopefully after a lot of participation we will see the most popular PHP framework.

His motivation is to provide a good resource to developers looking to choose a framework and wanting to find one of the best supported and most used choices. He also solicits comments on the post if you have opinions on why one framework shines above the rest.

tagged: favorite framework poll zendframework symfony prado cakephp codeigniter

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Eirik Hoem's Blog:
VCL/PHP followup
Aug 26, 2008 @ 10:21:55

With a follow up to a previous post of his about Delphi's choice of VCL over Prado for the behind the scenes framework for their software, Eirik Hoem has posted this based on feedback from the original post.

What I miss in the feedback I got from my previous post was people acually using VCL/PHP for enterprise applications and how that is working. From what I can tell the usage of Exceptions is still limited to the 3rd party libs such as Zend Framework which are included with VCL/PHP. That's a bit interesting.

He mentions one big issue that several people pointed out with the VLC implementation - the class name prefixing (or lack there of) and the problems it could cause in the future. Prado uses naming conventions that keep its classes out of the move generally named realm. He also touches on the quality of the code behind the VLC implementation, noting that while it might work well for smaller projects, there's more of a potential for failure on enterprise-level usage.

tagged: vcl followup prado delphi backend library choice

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Zenning! Blog:
Web Frameworks: Which one to learn?
Jul 24, 2008 @ 12:02:52

On the Zenning! blog there's a recent post, the first part of a series, that looks at various web application frameworks both PHP and not (including Ruby on Rails, Prado and Django).

As of now, we are moving through the era of web application frameworks. That's the landscape we are surrounded with. Plenty of frameworks have been built during these years broadly categorized under software frameworks, web application frameworks and JavaScript frameworks (or libraries), and plenty more are being developed.

He starts with these frameworks:

He looks at the non-PHP frameworks first to see how difficult they'd be to get into. Despite reservations about the different language structure, he shows favoritism towards Ruby on Rails. He has reviewed the PHP frameworks yet, so it's not a final decision.

tagged: framework cakephp codeigniter symfony prado django rubyonrails

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Alex Netkachov's Blog:
Zend, Prado, ASP.NET. Which framework is the best?
May 15, 2008 @ 08:48:42

In his latest blog entry, Alex Netkachov asks a question that has been wondered hundreds of times over - "which framework is best?" (though, to be fair, his is limited to three choices - Zend, Prado and ASP.NET).

I've been asked on the forum about my preferences in frameworks and I wrote a few thoughts about it.

These comments include the fact that eighty percent of his code is not in frameworks, that the Zend Framework is the more flexible of the group and that the right tools, methods and language structure is the real key to making for successful software development.

tagged: framework opinion zendframework prado aspnet

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Mike Naberezny's Blog:
Request/Response or Bust
Apr 27, 2008 @ 06:47:16

In a response to these comments made by Paul Jones concerning the Prado framework, Mike Naberezny shares his thoughts on the framework, the "PHP way", and how the majority of site functionality out there can really be divided up pretty simply.

RADO is getting some new attention because it was completely revamped earlier this month. It's certainly matured considerably since the contest and is the most well-known component framework for PHP. However, in all that time since PRADO was first introduced, the idea of a component framework hasn't been adopted by the majority of PHP developers. Why is that?

Although PRADO is a nice piece of software, Paul surmises that a component model as used by Microsoft .NET (Visual Web Developer now free!) and its close cousin PRADO is not the "PHP way" or "PHP spirit". For the most part, I agree with this. Although, I don't think it's necessarily a PHP-specific issue. I think it speaks to a larger architectural decision - how far to abstract out the HTTP request/response paradigm.

He summarizes the functionality in three different methods of handling: "page/file based", "action based", and "component based". He also notes that the interesting fact is that the "page/file based" method seems to be so dominant in the PHP world, only emphasizing the fact that PHP is more of a "get it done" language than anything.

tagged: request response bust prado .net asp architectures request response bust prado .net asp architectures

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Mike Naberezny's Blog:
Request/Response or Bust
Apr 27, 2008 @ 06:47:16

In a response to these comments made by Paul Jones concerning the Prado framework, Mike Naberezny shares his thoughts on the framework, the "PHP way", and how the majority of site functionality out there can really be divided up pretty simply.

RADO is getting some new attention because it was completely revamped earlier this month. It's certainly matured considerably since the contest and is the most well-known component framework for PHP. However, in all that time since PRADO was first introduced, the idea of a component framework hasn't been adopted by the majority of PHP developers. Why is that?

Although PRADO is a nice piece of software, Paul surmises that a component model as used by Microsoft .NET (Visual Web Developer now free!) and its close cousin PRADO is not the "PHP way" or "PHP spirit". For the most part, I agree with this. Although, I don't think it's necessarily a PHP-specific issue. I think it speaks to a larger architectural decision - how far to abstract out the HTTP request/response paradigm.

He summarizes the functionality in three different methods of handling: "page/file based", "action based", and "component based". He also notes that the interesting fact is that the "page/file based" method seems to be so dominant in the PHP world, only emphasizing the fact that PHP is more of a "get it done" language than anything.

tagged: request response bust prado .net asp architectures request response bust prado .net asp architectures

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Eirik Hoem's Blog:
Prado Framework 3.1.2 released
Apr 24, 2008 @ 09:38:49

Eirik Hoem has posted about the latest update of his favorite framework being ready for download - Prado.

My favorite PHP framework just got a new release, adding several new components and fixing 30-ish bugs. The bundled JavaScript libs (Prototype / script.aculo.us) have also been upgraded, so that should help lots of people struggling with the old versions.

You can download the framework from its website and, if you're new to it, check out the tutorial to get you started. Prado is a free PHP5-based rapid application development framework that doesn't go with the usual MVC format of most frameworks. It opts instead for "logic be stored in classes and presentation in templates".

tagged: prado framework download release version quickstart tutorial

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