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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with Symfony2 Route Annotations
November 06, 2014 @ 09:27:25

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a new tutorial posted that gets into the details on one of the powerful (and most used) components of the Symfony framework, the Router, and how to interact with it via annotations. Symfony's route annotations allow you to define functionality at the controller level or via a YAML configuration file.

When you download the Standard Symfony 2 Distribution, it includes an interesting bundle named SensioFrameworkExtraBundle which implements a lot of great stuff, especially the opportunity to use annotations directly within your controllers. The idea behind this article is not to convice developers to embrace this way of doing, but to point the finger at an alternative method to easily configure controllers. Keep in mind that there is no magic recipe, it depends on what you need in each specific scenario. Symfony 2 implements a strong built-in component to manage all the routes of an application: the Routing Component. Basically, a route maps a URL to a controller action.

His example sets up a simple blog and compares the two ways of configuring the routing: one side putting it all in the YAML configuration and the other in the controller docblocks (annotations) themselves. He adds a base page for showing the listing of posts and a single article route, complete with slugs. He also shows how to add in some additional configuration handling to do things like set default values, making things required and enforcing the HTTP method on the request (GET, POST, PUT, etc)

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route annotations introduction docblock tutorial yaml configuration settings

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-symfony2-route-annotations/

Web Mozarts:
Defining PHP Annotations in XML
October 24, 2014 @ 11:10:53

The Web Mozarts blog has an interesting new post today that talks about using annotations in your PHP code to define the attributes in resulting XML that could be generated dynamically from your objects.

Annotations have become a popular mechanism in PHP to add metadata to your source code in a simple fashion. Their benefits are clear: They are easy to write and simple to understand. Editors offer increasing support for auto-completing and auto-importing annotations. But there are also various counter-arguments: Annotations are written in documentation blocks, which may be removed from packaged code. Also, they are coupled to the source code. Whenever an annotation is changed, the project needs to be rebuilt. This is desirable in some, but not in other cases.

They focus in on Symfony-based applications as a good base to work from (as they've pushed to have annotations work in the code for things like routing and data type definition). He starts with an example Doctrine class - a "best buddy" for Symfony as far as annotations go - and how the annotations define the different properties. He also includes an example of the XML output of the same definition generated through an "AnnotationReader" instance. He talks about having multiple XML documents representing one object with different annotations put in each, including the XML output. The post finishes with some advantages including the ease of validation by XML-friendly tools looking to interface with the application.

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annotations xml tutorial symfony doctrine example

Link: http://webmozarts.com/2014/10/24/defining-php-annotations-in-xml/

Laravel Podcast:
Episode 18 - Laravel 5 Routing, the War over PHP Annotations, and The Secret Weapon
October 20, 2014 @ 11:05:05

The Laravel Podcast has released their latest episode, Episode #18: Laravel 5 Routing, the War over PHP Annotations, and The Secret Weapon(tm). Join hosts Shawn McCool, Taylor Otwell and Jeffrey Way as they talk all things Laravel.

In this episode, we discuss new Laravel 5 features including annotated routing and middlewares. We discuss some motivations and guiding forces that make Laravel what it is. Also, hints about Jeffrey and Taylor's secret new project. The referenced article by @everzet can be found here: http://everzet.com/post/99045129766/introducing-modelling-by-example.

You can listen to this latest episode either by using the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed.

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laravel podcast ep18 routing annotations secretweapon

Link: http://www.buzzsprout.com/11908/212256-episode-18-laravel-5-routing-the-war-over-php-annotations-and-the-secret-weapon-tm

Jake Bell:
PHP Annotations Are a Horrible Idea
October 18, 2012 @ 09:45:56

In his latest post Jake Bell talks about why he thinks annotations in PHP are a bad idea (not the concept of them, but how developers are currently using them. He's in favor of officil support though).

Both the Symfony 2 and Doctrine 2 libraries and components make liberal use of what have come to be called annotations - special code comments, usually prefixed with an @ that are actually interpreted by the application and affect its functionality. [...] This trend needs to die.

He points out that the use of code comments like this isn't a good practice and applications should never have to rely on them for functionality. He mentions issues with syntax/language functionality (can't use "php -l" on them, can't var_dump an annotation) and that it makes it more difficult to read and interpret the code. He includes an example from Ruby of an alternative and a possible solution in PHP involving a static "mapping" variable.

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Karsten Deubert's Blog:
Zend_MVC, Controller Plugins and Annotations
November 28, 2011 @ 12:02:50

Karsten Deubert has a recent post to his blog looking at annotations in Zend Framework applications to enhance functionality already in the framework.

Recently I had the idea to influence Controller Actions with annotations but discarded it with thoughts like "In PHP I will have to use reflection and some black magic to get this working which will have insane performance hits for my applications"... until I set everything up to see that it costs just 1-2ms in average per request without any form of caching.

He includes a few bits of code to show a simple annotation example (setting a layout) and the controller plugin that performs the translation. In his case, it's hard-coded to look for the "@layout" annotation in the docblock comment, but it'd be relatively trivial to extend it to a more full-featured version.

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zendframework mvc controller annotations docblock comment plugin


Rafael Dohms' Blog:
Filtering objects using annotations
August 12, 2011 @ 10:04:37

Rafael Dohms has an interesting new post to his site today looking at a library he's developed (inspired by the Symfony Validation library) to help filtering values with rules defined in annotations.

PHP does not have native Annotations support, however many projects have been using doc blocks to add value and semantics to code, like PHPUnit, Doctrine and Symfony. The Doctrine did a really good job in making available a Annotation parser kit, which allows you to bring the power of annotations into you own project. This opens up a few possibilities.

He shows the current use of the Validation library with a sample check of a $name variable for "not blank". His tool, DMS, extends this functionality and gives you access to both custom filtering methods and standard PHP functions to filter the resulting variable value. He includes an example showing two variables with filters StripTags, StripNewlines and Trim as well as the code to execute the filtering. You can get the library either ready to integrate with Symfony/Doctrine or as a standalone tool.

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filtering symfony annotations validation library


Symfony Blog:
Symfony2 Annotations gets better
May 23, 2011 @ 11:08:53

Fabien Potencier has posted another in his "getting better" series looking at the features that are included in the Symfony2 framework. In this new post he talks about the improvement annotation support.

Later today, I will release Symfony2 beta2. But first, I wanted to talk about a big change that landed into master yesterday. As you might know, Symfony2 uses annotations for Doctrine mapping information and validation configuration. Of course, it is entirely optional, and the same can be done with XML, YAML, or even PHP. But using annotations is convenient and allows you to define everything in the same file.

Two new bundles were added, SensioFrameworkExtraBundle and JMSSecurityExtraBundle, that let you use annotations in the controller for configuration. Examples of this new feature are included in the post giving the configuration settings a more "native" feel.

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annotations native controller configuration


Gonzalo Ayuso's Blog:
Function decorators in PHP with PHPDoc and Annotations
February 01, 2011 @ 13:13:04

Gonzalo Ayuso has a new post to his blog looking at some of the recent work he's done with PHPDoc and annotations to create "function decorators" in his code.

The idea is to solve the same problem I had when I wrote the previous article. I want to protect the execution of certain functions in a class to only being executed if the user is logged on. [...] The solution with interfaces is clean and simple (no extra libraries need and no reflection need too). The problem is that I can use it only for all the functions of the class.

He gives an example class with four different methods (one with annotations) and his annotation parsing class that runs the predispatch and postdispatch methods based on those annotations. He also shows another examples using an abstract class.

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annotations decorator phpdocumentor tutorial


Genius Blog:
Advanced PHPUnit Annotations
August 19, 2009 @ 12:20:33

On the Genius.com blog today there's a new post from Bill Hewett looking at some of the advanced notations you can use in your unit testing (directives in comments starting with "@").

PHPUnit, borrowing a handy feature from Java's JUnit testing library allows you to use certain directives beginning with "@" in comments of your test or application code to access test-related functionality. These directives, known as annotations, even expose features not otherwise accessible to PHPUnit users.

He looks at a list of eight including @assert, @dataProvider and @test as well as some of the new ones coming in PHPUnit 3.4.

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advanced phpunit unittest annotations


PHPImpact Blog:
Using Annotations in PHP
July 22, 2008 @ 07:55:04

On the PHP::Impact blog today there's a new post showing how to use annotations in your application's code that can be used by the Addendum library.

Annotations provide data about a program that is not part of the program itself. They have no direct effect on the operation of the code they annotate. In PHP, annotations can only be read reflectively at run time.

They allow you to document, with meta-data, information about the classes, methods and variables inside the script. They show three of the annotation types - a marker, a single-value and a multi-value.

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