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Laravel News:
Using the Google API with Socialite
Apr 11, 2017 @ 09:47:36

On the Laravel News site there's a new tutorial posted showing you how to use the Socialite package with the Google API to connect a user's account and get a list of their contacts.

When I start a project that requires users to log in using their Google accounts, I immediately turned to Laravel Socialite. Socialite is one of Laravel’s official packages, but it is clear it only handles user authentication, making its use not as dynamic as I had hoped it would be. While I needed users to log in, I also needed to get a list of their Google Contacts. In this post, I’ll show you how I was able to query a list of contacts from Google’s People API and keep using Socialite.

They start with a basic guide to creating an application on the Google API Console and what information you'll need (credentials) to allow your application to connect. Then, using the Google API Client for PHP and the functionality built into Socialite they create the approval flow and how to handle refresh tokens should your token expire.

tagged: tutorial laravel socialite contacts google api token

Link: https://laravel-news.com/google-api-socialite

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Let’s Kill the Password! Magic Login Links to the Rescue!
Dec 15, 2016 @ 12:36:17

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted from Christopher Vundi showing you how to create a password-less login system using "magic links". These links allow users to log into a service without requiring a password using a one-time code and a special URL.

Authentication is something that has evolved over the years. We have seen it change from email – password combination to social authentication, and finally password-less authentication. Actually, more like an “email only” authentication. In the case of a password-less login, the app assumes that you will get the login link from your inbox if the email provided is indeed yours.

[...] In this tutorial, we are going to implement such a system in a Laravel app. The complete code can be found here.

The tutorial then walks you through some of the setup of the application environment - creating the Laravel project, building out the database and running the "make:auth" to generate related controllers/views/models. They show you how to change the login link to point to the new "magic link" functionality and the matching controller and view. The tutorial then shows how to generate the tokens, email them to the user with the special URL and validate them once they come back in.

tagged: password magic login link tutorial token email

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/lets-kill-the-password-magic-login-links-to-the-rescue/

Kévin Gomez:
Digging into: Humbug
Oct 27, 2016 @ 12:12:36

Kévin Gomez has a recent post to his site sharing some of the knowledge he gained when digging into Humbug, a mutation testing tool for PHP development.

While I’ve already used Humbug a few time, a recent article made my realise that I didn’t really know how it worked.

That’s when I got the idea to dig into Humbug to learn how it works, and publish my findings here.

He starts with a brief overview of Humbug for those not familiar with it - a mutation testing tool that reviews your unit tests to see how well they actually cover your code. It performs various operations (mutations) on the tests and evaluates the response. He then gets into how Humbug does this and what tools it uses to break down and understand your tests. He then goes through the actual code of the tool, walking through the tests, tokenizing the code and performing small changes to re-test and see how the results differ from the original results.

tagged: humbug mutation testing tool indepth library token variation

Link: http://blog.kevingomez.fr/2016/10/23/digging-into-humbug/

Matt Stauffer:
Introducing Laravel Passport
Aug 01, 2016 @ 09:35:05

In his continuing series of posts looking at the upcoming features in the next version of the Laravel framework (v5.3) Matt Stauffer has posted about a new security-related offering that was recently announced at the Laracon US conference: Laravel Passport.

API authentication can be tricky. OAuth 2 is the reigning ruler of the various standards that you might consider, but it's complex and difficult to implement—even with the great packages available (League and Luca).

[...] Laravel Passport is native OAuth 2 server for Laravel apps. Like Cashier and Scout, you'll bring it into your app with Composer. It uses the League OAuth2 Server package as a dependency but provides a simple, easy-to-learn and easy-to-implement syntax.

He briefly mentions the "groundwork" that was laid for Passport in v5.2 and the application of different authentication mechanisms at different times. He then moves into the installation and configuration of the Passport system (it's not bundled so it's a separate install). He then talks about the management API that's automatically set up, the Vue.js frontend for managing clients and tokens and what it looks like when one is requested. He also provides a bit of sample code you can use to test it out for yourself once you've created a client and token on your system. He ends the post talking about the command line token generation of "personal" tokens and using middleware "scopes" to allow for easier cross-authorizations between routes.

tagged: laravel passport oauth api package release vuejs client token tutorial

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/introducing-laravel-passport

DotDev.co:
Test Driven API Development using Laravel, Dingo and JWT with Documentation
Jun 20, 2016 @ 10:15:04

On the DotDev.co site a tutorial has been posted showing the full set up of an API using Laravel, Dingo and JWT tokens while following test-driven development principles along the way.

As the complexity of API’s increase, improving the ways we create them becomes a necessity. Let’s take a journey exploring an efficient way of building well-tested API’s that are easy to develop and maintain by wiring up several different open-source packages.

In this tutorial, we will build a very simple API for fruits that lists all the fruits, shows one fruit, creates a fruit, and finally deletes a fruit. The API will allow anyone to list and show fruits but we will use JWT Authentication to protect creating and deleting operations so only the registered users can use them.

The tutorial starts by helping you get the TDD environment set up for the application and the required libraries installed. From there they install and configure Dingo and look at the role that transformers play in the API output. With a basic API in place the JWT tokens are integrated and another package is used to generate simple, clean API documentation. Full links to other packages, screenshots of the expected output and all the code you'll need is included.

tagged: testdriven development tdd laravel api dingo jwt token tutorial

Link: https://dotdev.co/test-driven-api-development-using-laravel-dingo-and-jwt-with-documentation-ae4014260148#.tccatytip

Mohamed Said:
Building an API for 3rd party applications
Mar 30, 2016 @ 09:30:31

In this post to his site Mohamed Said shows you how to build an API that allows for easier integration with your content/functionality by 3rd party applications. This example uses the Laravel framework but the ideas could be applied in any framework.

APIs are cool, & laravel can handle all the coolness you may desire. Here we talk about building an API for third party applications and allowing them to communicate with your application on behalf of users.

He starts where any good project should: planning for what features need to be included and the flow of the request/response process. He then walks you through the whole process for setting up the API:

  • Updating the routes for the API request endpoints
  • Creating the new Auth and Home controllers
  • Setting up the migration for the "applications" table
  • Using the firebase/php-jwt library for authentication/authorization handling
  • Registering a token and validating it on the incoming request

He wraps up the post talking about user authentication via a simplified OAuth-ish process flow, making requests using the resulting token and logging the user out (expiring the token).

tagged: api tutorial laravel application integration jwt token authentication authorization

Link: http://themsaid.github.io/laravel-api-3rd-party-20160327/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Build an API-Only JWT-Powered Laravel App
Feb 18, 2016 @ 10:55:25

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from author Francesco Malatesta showing you how to build an API with Laravel that uses only JWT tokens for authorization handling.

In this article, we will learn how to use it to quickly create a fully functional API for an imaginary book wishlist application. As an aside, we will also see how to build a client application with AngularJS that will use our APIs.

They start the tutorial by having you clone a boilerplate project to get some of the basics out of the way first. From there they start in on the functionality: a basic wishlist where users can add books they like. They show the code needed to build out the User controller and matching routes. The tutorial shows the interaction with the functionality using requests from Postman to sign up a new user and get a matching JWT token back. The tutorial then does the same for the book handling, creating the controller, routes and functionality to show a book, store it for a user, remove it from the user's wishlist and delete the book completely.

tagged: api laravel tutorial application jwt token wishlist application

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-build-an-api-only-jwt-powered-laravel-app/

Matt Stauffer:
Multiple authentication guard drivers (including API) in Laravel 5.2
Jan 25, 2016 @ 09:24:31

Matt Stauffer has a new post in his series looking at the features in the latest version of the Laravel framework (v5.2) with this look at guard drivers and how 5.2 allows you to use more than one at once.

Let's get back to Laravel 5.2 features, shall we? 5.2 introduced a significant boost to the power of the entire authentication system, including making it much simpler to have multiple "guards" running at once. The default authentication guard in Laravel prior to 5.2 (now named the web guard) is your traditional web-based application authentication layer: username and password post to a controller. [...] But what if you want to have an API running in the same app, and it uses JSON web tokens (or some other stateless, non-session authentication mechanism)? In the past you'd have to jump through a lot of hoops to have multiple authentication drivers running at the same time.

He shows how to edit the auth.php configuration file to add in more "guard" instances to the default request handling. He also talks about the new driver that backends the "api" guard: the token driver. He briefly introduces the driver and talks about how it works with the current authentication setup. He also looks at changes you can make to use non-default drivers in your auth requests and how to set up your own custom drivers.

tagged: multiple authentication api token guard driver tutorial laravel

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/multiple-authentication-guard-drivers-including-api-in-laravel-5-2

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
Github auth token on TravisCI
Sep 24, 2015 @ 11:42:01

In a post to his site Cees-Jan Kiewiet shows you how to get an authentication token from GitHub to use in your testing on the Travis-CI continuous integration service.

The composer cache greatly speeds up your composer part of the build by only going to Github for new downloads. When combined with test lowest, current, and highest possible on Travis you only reach out to Github for new versions. Most likely to happen during the highest possible set of builds, but also when you've updated composer.*. This normally isn't an issue unless you hit Github's rate limit. And since composer is running on a 'public' travis box with a 'public' IP address that has been use by many builds before it there is a very very high chance it already hit the 60 requests per hour limit.

[...] To counter this problem we have to set a Github authentication token as environment variable in Travis for each project. And update .travis.yml so the token is used by composer.

He walks you through the steps you'll need to get a token of your very own:

  • Go to the Settings section on your GitHub account
  • Generate a new Personal Access Token
  • Add the token to the Travis-CI account you're using for your builds
  • Update your .travis.yml configuration with the token information

Each step includes either a screenshot of where to go or the configuration example you'll need to use (like in the yml file).

tagged: github authentication token travisci ratelimit

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/09/github-auth-token-on-travis/

Rob Allen:
Slim-Csrf with Slim 3
Aug 25, 2015 @ 09:49:48

In a post to his site Rob Allen shows you how to help secure your Slim 3-based applications with the help of the slim3-csrf package. A CSRF (cross-site request forgery) attack happens when another site requests a page in your application, possibly performing an action.

In addition to the core Slim framework, we also ship a number of add-ons that are useful for specific types of problems. One of these is Slim-Csrf which provides CSRF protection. This is middleware that sets a token in the session for every request that you can then set as an hidden input field on a form. When the form is submitted, the middleware checks that the value in the form field matches the value stored in the session. If they match, then the all is okay, but if they don't then an error is raised.

He shows how to add the middleware to your Slim 3 application and how to add the token to each form. The library generates random values for both the name of the token and the value making it compatible with applications that may involve multiple browser windows. He also shows you how to validate the token, either using the built-in "Guard" handling or manually by deferring the check to the route.

tagged: slim3 csrf token package library install configure validate

Link: http://akrabat.com/slim-csrf-with-slim-3/