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HHVM Blog:
Hack Developer Day 2014 Keep Hacking
April 11, 2014 @ 09:40:00

On the Facebook HHVM blog today there's a post about the Hack Developer Day they recently held in Menlo Park. The event brought in developers for a day of presentations from the Hack/HHVM engineers.

150+ Members of the PHP and developer community came to Facebook headquarters and joined over 2000 people online for presentations by the engineers of Hack and HHVM. Afterwards we held a five hour hackathon, where the attendees worked with those engineers to write Hack code, either by converting current codebases or writing new code from scratch.

For those that weren't able to attend or are interested in catching up on what was presented, they've posted videos of all of the sessions in a YouTube playlist as well as PDFs of all the slides. If you want the short version of what was presented, there's a quick list in the post or you can read a recap on the Facebook Engineering blog.

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hack developer day facebook presentation video slides summary

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/4685/hack-developer-day-2014-keep-hacking

PHPClasses.org:
4 Reasons Why All PHP Frameworks Suck?
February 05, 2014 @ 10:53:28

On the PHPClasses.org site today there's a new blog post with four reasons "why all PHP frameworks suck" based on some recent comments from PHP's creator Rasmus Lerdorf.

Rasmus Lerdorf, the PHP creator, was invited to give a talk in PHP Frameworks Day conference. He talked mostly about the latest PHP developments, but for me the most interesting part was the question and answers section. Among other things, somebody asked Rasmus about his opinion on the PHP frameworks. That was as straight question about his opinion, so Rasmus gave a straight answer (near 31m 47s): "They (PHP frameworks) All suck!"

Some follow up was given to his comment with the four main points:

  • Frameworks Execute The Same Code Repeatedly Without Need
  • Frameworks Require Too Many Interdependent Classes
  • [They provide] Needlessly Complicated Solutions
  • Duplicating the Web Server Functionality

A summary is provided for each of these comments and some of the other questions Rasmus answered are also in the post including the dropping of APC over Zend Opcode, compiling PHP to binary and unicode. The post also includes the embedded video of Rasmus' full talk.

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Link: http://www.phpclasses.org/blog/post/226-4-Reasons-Why-All-PHP-Frameworks-Suck.html

Davey Shafik:
Everything You Need to Know About OpCode Caches
October 01, 2013 @ 10:49:48

Davey Shafik has a new post to his site today sharing everything you need to know about opcode caches, the mechanism that's works "behind the scenes" to cache the execution of the opcode paths for later reuse.

Last year I wrote a talk called "Fast, Not Furious: How to Find and Fix Slow Code" - a performance talk covering profiling, memcache and some other stuff. As I often do - to hedge my bets = I stuck a few slides on the end "just in case" I ran through everything too quickly and needed to fill in time. These slides were on APC, the Alternative PHP Cache, and went just a little into tokens and how APC works under the hood. I really enjoyed presenting those 6 slides, and I've been wanting to expand on that topic ever since then. Well, after a few weeks of hard work, some input from some great people, including Sara Golemon, Elizabeth Smith and Julien Pauli, I'm so very happy to publish PHP Performance I: Everything You Need to Know About OpCode Caches.

The result is published over on the Engine Yard Developer Center and has been made into a 20 minute screencast (with original slides here). He covers what they are, which ones are out there, the common execution cycle and what happens when the opcodes are cached.

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opcode cache presentation screencast guide tutorial apc zend opcache

Link: http://daveyshafik.com/archives/68838-everything-you-need-to-know-about-opcode-caches.html

SitePoint Web Blog:
Building Amazing Presentations with WImpress
September 17, 2013 @ 11:57:06

On SitePoint's Web blog today there's a post from Rakhitha Nimesh showing you how to create presentations with WImpress, the second part of their series on using the impress.js Javascript library (part one is here).

In the first part, we learned how to integrate impress.js into WordPress, for creating dynamic presentations with CSS transitions and transformations. impress.js is becoming one of the most popular JavaScript libraries in Github. [...] In this tutorial, we are going to look at the possibilities of enhancing the default features of impress.js while building an interactive presentation with WImpress.

They walk you through the creation of a simple presentation, complete with all the code you'll need. They show how to create the "options" page and add it to the WordPress site structure. The process allows you to specify text and a background image reusing some of the built-in WordPress functionality. They've also included some examples of the results for three different levels of a presentation - a simple single slide, adding "second level" steps and building a cube.

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impressjs wimpress tutorial presentation wordpress

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-amazing-presentations-wimpress/

[php]architect:
Introduction to PHP
September 12, 2013 @ 12:15:34

On the [php]architect site today, they mention an introduction to PHP to the DCWebWomen group. They've shared the slides as well, and it's a good high level look at the language.

Last night, Sandy and I presented a short introduction to PHP for DCWebWomen. Our presentation covered the growth of the language over the last decade and introduced the audience to basic language concepts like variable types, arrays, and control structures. The audience had excellent questions and feedback throughout the talk. We were pleased to share some of what we've learned.

You can find the slides here - Intro to PHP (it's a PDF) and it covers both concepts a beginning developer needs to know and actual code examples of how they work.

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introduction langauage dcwebwomen presentation slides phparchitect

Link: http://www.phparch.com/2013/09/introduction-to-php/

William Durand:
From STUPID to SOLID Code!
August 01, 2013 @ 12:45:11

William Durand has a new post to his site sharing not only the slides from his recent presentation on SOLID vs STUPID code but the same content written out. It provides a great overview of the two concepts and some examples of what to avoid. There's also a recording of the session you can listen to via the in-page player.

Last week I gave a talk about Object-Oriented Programming at Michelin, the company I am working for. I talked about writing better code, from STUPID to SOLID code! STUPID as well as SOLID are two acronyms, and have been covered quite a lot for a long time. However, these mnemonics are not always well-known, so it is worth spreading the word.

In the following, I will introduce both STUPID and SOLID principles. Keep in mind that these are principles, not laws. However, considering them as laws would be good for those who want to improve themselves.

He starts with the STUPID concepts first - Singleton, Tight Coupling, Untestability, Premature Optimization, Indescriptive Naming and Duplication. He goes through each of these and explains why they're bad things to have in your code. He then gets into the SOLID ideals - Single Responsibility Principle, Open/Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle, Interface Segregation Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle. These are a bit more complex to understand but he does a good job (complete with code snippets) of each. The slides for his presentation are also included but they're just a high level look at the same concepts from the article.

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presentation solid stupid code concepts slides recording overview

Link: http://williamdurand.fr/2013/07/30/from-stupid-to-solid-code

Brian Deshong:
Top Ten List + CoderFaire Atlanta 2013
April 12, 2013 @ 12:27:50

Brian Deshong has a new post to his site sharing some of the content (videos) from his upcoming CoderFaire Atlanta (April 20th) talk about web application performance that he's learned over his years in development.

Back in March, I gave a new talk at Atlanta PHP: "Top Ten List: PHP and Web Application Performance". This talk is a culmination of my ~14 years of experience primarily as a web application developer, but also as a systems administrator / DevOps-type. After working with PHP and web applications for so many years, I have amassed quite a few tricks for squeezing maximum performance out of web applications, PHP or otherwise.

The tips are presented by various people from around the web development (and PHP) community and relate to things like:

  • Realpath cache settings
  • Using offline processing
  • Optimized queries
  • Gzipping responses
  • Caching everything
  • Using a content delivery network

If you'd like to see Brian present the full talk, there's still time to get your ticket for CoderFaire - they're only $50 USD for the two day event.

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Link: http://www.deshong.net/2013/04/top-ten-list-coderfaire-atlanta-2013

Matt Frost:
Agent of Change Part 2 Presentation
February 05, 2013 @ 09:20:35

Following up on his previous post about being an "agent of change" in your organization (work, open source project, etc) Matt Frost has posted his second part of the series focusing on the presentation of your ideas.

In Part 2 we're going to talk about presentation of the pitch you put together for this change. It's important that your pitch be well researched and in some regards provable, as the Agent of Change the responsibility lies with you to prove the value of your idea. As we touched on in Part 1, a well thought out plan is going to go a long way in breaking down the barriers that make change difficult to take hold.

He makes a strong point that you need to identify the problem you're trying to solve (and what solution you're wanting to propose) clearly before trying to present it to a listening audience. He recommends quantifying your solution in terms everyone can understand like "hours of work" or cost. He recommends coming up with a short "elevator pitch" version to entice and the longer version to fill in the gaps.

You've got slides, documentation, statistics and loads of other good information that is going to benefit your development process, sales people in particular are looking for that jewel that helps set your organization apart; you've got that jewel!
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agent change series practices development presentation


Chris Hartjes:
You Need tests...just Not Yet
January 09, 2013 @ 10:44:28

In his most recent post Chris Hartjes looks at the concept of "test whenever" (vs TDD) development practices and how, sometimes, writing tests for things that are may get tossed when they're done may not be the best option.

Let's look at TDD vs. Test whenever. The trade-off being made here is not about quality of code or guarding against regressions. It's about opportunity cost. This had occurred to me but I had dismissed it as being "anti-testing". But I think I was wrong, and here's why.

He talks some about a presentation from Dan North< ("Decisions, Decisions") about when to test (not whether to test or not) and how he noticed his development team was being very productive, but with a "spike and stabilize" development method. He also talks about the concept of "opportunity cost" and how it plays a factor in when tests are introduced to the process.

The key to all this is being able to identify at what stage in this particular pattern your code is at. Is it still a spike, meaning you are working out implementation details and trying to figure out if it will even have the desired result? Or is it stable, providing solid value to the application as a whole and ready to be wrapped in tests to protect against regressions?
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testing advice spike stabilize opportunity cost presentation dannorth


Anthony Ferrara:
On Templating
December 11, 2012 @ 11:50:31

In this latest post to his site Anthony Ferrara take a look at templating in web applications - more specifically as it deals with his experience with the Mustache templating engine.

I've been playing around with tempting engines a lot lately. For a recent project, I needed the ability to re-use the same template set in both JS and PHP (coupled with the History API, providing seamless dynamic behavior, yet still having raw content pages). Realistically today, there's only one choice for that sort of requirement: Mustache. I've learned a lot while playing with Mustache, and it's really changed my entire viewpoint on presentation layer construction.

He briefly gives an overview of "the past" of templating in PHP (including a mention of Smarty) and how templating tools - like Mustache - have helped to improve the situation, especially when it comes to the separation of presentation and processing. As an alternative, there's also a mention of the Twig templating engine in the comments, another popular option from the Symfony project.

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templating presentation mustache twig introduction opinion



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