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Chris White:
Avoiding the burden of file uploads
Jun 14, 2016 @ 09:18:59

Chris White has a post to his site sharing a method he's come up with to avoid the burden of file uploads in your PHP application with the help of the offerings of Amazon S3 and some creative coding.

Handling file uploads sucks. Code-wise it's a fairly simple task, the files get sent along with a POST request and are available server-side in the $_FILES super global. Your framework of choice may even have a convenient way of dealing with these files, probably based on Symfony's UploadedFile class. Unfortunately it's not that simple.

[...] For most situations using S3 is a no brainer, but the majority of developers transfer their user's uploads to S3 after they have received them on the server side. This doesn't have to be the case, your user's web browser can send the file directly to an S3 bucket. You don't even have to open the bucket up to the public. Signed upload URLs with an expiry will allow temporary access to upload a single object.

He points out two advantages of this method: that you don't have to handle the upload part of file uploads and that it gives the user more control. He shares a video of the end result (a simple file upload frontend) and the code that you'll need to use the AWS PHP SDK to make it all work together. There's some configuration changes that'll need to be made on the S3 bucket side (like for CORS) but the code itself to make the connection is relatively simple. He does a great job of explaining every step of the way and includes the Javascript needed for the frontend as well.

tagged: file upload amazon s3 aws tutorial frontend

Link: https://cwhite.me/avoiding-the-burden-of-file-uploads/

Liip Blog:
Testing in the Cloud – Using Bamboo with Amazon AWS
Jun 08, 2016 @ 14:51:19

On the Liip blog there's a new post showing you how to set up "testing in the cloud" with the help of AWS and a Bamboo instance along with some custom configuration.

Bamboo is the continous integration service by Atlassian, the company owning the code management service Bitbucket (as well as the Jira issue tracker and Confluence wiki). Bamboo can run test suites and build any kind of artefact like generated documentation or installable packages. It integrates with Amazon Web Services, allowing to spin up EC2 instances as needed.

The article talks about the permissioning needed for the EC2 AWS instances and how to trigger automatic builds. They then get into the details of configuring the test runner and the PHPUnit setup to allow for the execution of your tests.

tagged: testing cloud aws bamboo amazon ec2 instance atlassian

Link: https://blog.liip.ch/archive/2016/06/08/testing-cloud-using-bamboo-with-amazon-aws.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Running an Elastic LAMP Stack on AWS
Mar 15, 2016 @ 11:54:38

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from Daniel Berman giving you a step by step guide to setting up an Elastic LAMP stack on AWS, the Amazon Web Services platform using Zend Server.

This article introduces what is probably one of the simplest ways of setting up and running an elastic LAMP stack on the cloud – using Zend Server on AWS.

More specifically, the workflow described here includes launching a pre-configured AWS CloudFormation template that sets up all the components of a LAMP stack: Zend Server’s certified PHP stack plus all of Zend Server’s add-on features (including Z-Ray), a MySQL database, a Zend Server elastic group consisting of additional Zend Server instances, an elastic load balancer, and other pre-configured security definitions. This article is perfect for those contemplating moving their production environment to the cloud or those who already have one set up on AWS.

He starts with some of the basics: what Zend Server is and what role CloudFormation plays in the deployment process. The rest of the tutorial is broken up into several steps of the setup and deployment process:

  • Step 1: Launching the stack
  • Step 2: Managing the stack
  • Step 3: Deploying an application
  • Step 4: Monitoring the stack

They include screenshots of the web-based interfaces you'll use to complete each of these steps, giving you a great visual guide to where you should be and what things should look like. In the end you'll have a simple application, running in AWS on Zend Server you can easily monitor and configure.

tagged: zendserver tutorial elastic aws amazon webservices setup configure guide

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/running-an-elastic-lamp-stack-on-aws/

Debugging WordPress with Zend Server and Z-Ray on AWS
Aug 05, 2015 @ 11:57:02

The Zend.com blog has a post showing you how to debug WordPress running on Zend Server with the help of the Z-Ray plugin. In their example they're hosting it on an AWS instance, but the same technique can apply on any other hosted version as well.

More and more PHP development is being done in the cloud and on virtual platforms nowadays. The workflow detailed in this brief tutorial is just one way to develop PHP in these environments, but it illustrates just how easy and productive this type of development can be. More specifically, it demonstrates how to launch the newly available Zend Server 8.5 instance on AWS with a WordPress application already deployed, and then use Z-Ray to introspect and debug the code.

The tutorial walks you through the setup and configuration of a new AWS instance with Zend Server and WordPress installed (you can skip to the end if you already have this). They show you how to:

  • Launch the Zend Server AWS instance
  • Configure the instance to install WordPress as a part of the setup process
  • Access the Zend Server control panel
  • Accessing the WordPress application deployed on the instance

Once the WordPress application is accessed, the Z-Ray inspection bar will appear at the bottom giving you insight into various configuration options, performance metrics and server information. They also link to a video with more information about the WordPress plugin.

tagged: zendserver wordpress aws amazon instance zray debug tutorial install configure

Link: http://blog.zend.com/2015/08/04/debugging-wordpress-with-zend-server-and-z-ray-on-aws

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
AWS PHP SDK Asynchronously
Jun 30, 2015 @ 11:31:15

Cees-Jan Kiewiet has a new post today talking about some interesting trickery he was able to do with the AWS (Amazon Web Services) PHP SDK to allow requests to be made asynchronously.

Just got off the AWS SDK for PHP Office Hour hangout and it was great talking with both team members Jeremy and Michael. And one of the things we talked about was async access to the AWS services using the PHP SDK. The goal of this post is to get the AWS PHP SDK client working asynchronously.

He starts with brief instructions on getting the SDK installed (via Composer) along with a library of his own that brings in a few other dependencies. The ReactPHP event loop is what makes the asynchronous connections possible. He includes the code to create the new handler stack and how to use it to make the asynchronous calls. A demo screencast is also included in the post to illustrate the output from a simple set of requests.

tagged: aws amazon sdk asynchronous connection reactphp event loop tutorial

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/06/aws-php-sdk-asynchronously/

AWS Development Blog:
DynamoDB JSON and Array Marshaling for PHP
Feb 04, 2015 @ 10:51:30

In the latest post to the AWS PHP Development blog Jeremy Lindblom looks at a new feature of their PHP SDK that allows for more flexibility (and easier handling) when using DynamoDB for document storage in storing more complex data.

Back in October of 2014, Amazon DynamoDB added support for new data types, including the map (M) and list (L) types. These new types, along with some API updates, make it possible to store more complex, multilevel data, and use DynamoDB for document storage.

He talks about a new class thats been added to help work with the DynamoDB storage, the DynamoDb Marshaler (in version >= 2.2.7) that handles the push and pull of the JSON document data directly from the storage, reducing the need to perform the operation manually. He includes code examples of its use and JSON examples of what results are returned on a get request. He also shows how to use it with a native PHP array, translating it with help from the Marshaler and the "marshalItem" method.

tagged: aws development sdk amazon dynamodb json storage marshaler

Link: http://blogs.aws.amazon.com/php/post/Tx3QE1CEXG8QG1Z/DynamoDB-JSON-and-Array-Marshaling-for-PHP

Ben Ramsey:
Setting Up Jenkins on Amazon Linux for PHP Testing
Aug 08, 2014 @ 09:36:33

Ben Ramsey has posted a complete walk-through of setting up and configuring Jenkins on an AWS instance for testing your PHP applications.

One of my first tasks at ShootProof was to set up a Jenkins server for continuous integration and get it ready to run unit tests for PHP and JavaScript code. There are plenty of tutorials around the web to help you do just that. This is yet another one, but it’s primarily my cleaned-up notes -and less of a tutorial - placed here for my future self to find and provided publicly for all to benefit. These instructions are specifically tailored for setting up Jenkins on an Amazon Linux EC2 instance.

While he doesn't call it a "tutorial" it's still a great step-by-step guide to the things you'll need and the process to follow including commands, installing and starting Jenkins and configuring the environment to execute your tests. The main goal was to set it up for PHP-based applications, but he also throws in the setup of some Javascript testing via Node.js and the PhantomJS/CasperJS combo.

tagged: jenkins tutorial amazon aws instance setup configure linux unittest

Link: http://benramsey.com/blog/2014/08/setting-up-jenkins-on-amazon-linux-for-php-testing/

AWS PHP Development:
Testing Webhooks Locally for Amazon SNS
Apr 08, 2014 @ 11:33:07

In a previous post the AWS for PHP blog showed how to set up webhooks for handling the callbacks from their SNS messaging service. In this next part of the series they continue the process, showing how you can test these hooks locally without needing to actually send the messages. This eliminates the need to deploy to a public-facing server just to test the hooks every time you need an update.

In a recent post, I talked about Receiving Amazon SNS Messages in PHP. I showed you how to use the SNS Message and MessageValidator classes in the AWS SDK for PHP to handle incoming SNS messages. The PHP code for the webhook is easy to write, but can be difficult to test properly, since it must be deployed to a server in order to be accessible to Amazon SNS. I'll show you how you can actually test your code locally with the help of a few simple tools.

Using PHP's own built-in webserver and a tool called ngrok to tunnel from the public internet to a local server. He includes the commands to set up the PHP script directory, the code to intercept the POSTed data from the request, validate it and send the subscription confirmation request. He helps you create an SNS "topic" through the management console and walks you through a sample test request while tailing the logs.

tagged: aws amazon sns webhook testing local server ngrok tutorial

Link: http://blogs.aws.amazon.com/php/post/Tx2CO24DVG9CAK0/Testing-Webhooks-Locally-for-Amazon-SNS

AWS PHP Development:
Receiving Amazon SNS Messages in PHP
Apr 01, 2014 @ 10:53:14

The Amazon Web Services PHP Development blog has a new post from Jeremy Lindblom showing you how you can receive inbound SNS messages via a webhook on your application.

Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) is a fast, fully-managed, push messaging service. Amazon SNS can deliver messages to email, mobile devices, Amazon SQS queues, and HTTP/HTTPS endpoints. [...] Though you can certainly subscribe your email address to receive SNS messages from service events like these, your inbox would fill up rather quickly. There is great power, however, in being able to subscribe an HTTP/HTTPS endpoint to receive the messages. This allows you to program webhooks for your applications to easily respond to various events.

Using the AWS SDK for PHP you can set up a listening script that can receive the message and handle subscription confirmations, message signature validation and handling the notifications.

tagged: amazon aws sns message receive webhook sdk

Link: http://blogs.aws.amazon.com/php/post/Tx2G9D94IE6KPAY/Receiving-Amazon-SNS-Messages-in-PHP

Till Klampaeckel:
Speeding up composer on AWS OpsWorks
Oct 09, 2013 @ 12:10:25

Till Klampaeckel has a new post today showing how to get your Composer installation (and package install) to work a bit faster on the Amazon AWS OpsWorks management system.

At EasyBib, we're heavy users of composer and AWS OpsWorks. Since we recently moved a lot of our applications to a continuous deployment model, the benefits of speeding up the deployment process (~4-5 minutes) became more obvious.

He talks some about the current needs of their deployment process and how one option - symlinking the "vendors" directory just wouldn't work. Instead, they make use of Ruby and Chef to work with the OpsWorks hook system that fire on deployment. He includes the example Ruby scripts they put in place to handle "before migrate", "before symlink", "before restart" and "after restart" events. This new setup saved them about two to three minutes on their total deployment time and resulted in a much more stable environment.

tagged: amazon aws opsworks composer install ruby chef hooks deployment

Link: http://till.klampaeckel.de/blog/archives/202-Speeding-up-composer-on-AWS-OpsWorks.html