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Symfony Blog:
The Symfony Demo application, three months later
Jul 27, 2015 @ 10:27:02

The Symfony blog has a post that talks about the state of the Symfony "Demo" application three months after its release. The "Demo" application is a simpler way to get an entire Symfony 2 application up and running, giving you a good foundation for either your own development or quick testing.

The [Symfony Demo application](https://github.com/symfony/symfony-demo) was publicly introduced three months ago. In addition to being a learning resource, it's considered the reference implementation of the [Symfony Best Practices](http://symfony.com/doc/current/best_practices/index.html). During the past weeks, we've been busy adding new features to showcase Symfony functionalities. This article is a quick recap of the most important new features.

They talk about four different improvements to the demo setup and configuration process:

  • Full internationalization
  • New console commands
  • New technical requirements checker
  • New JavaScript and Sass/CSS management

They also briefly mention a few other miscellaneous changes at the end of the application around security, debugging helpers and more functional testing.

tagged: symfony demo application improvements symfony2

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/the-symfony-demo-application-three-months-later

Magenticians:
On Magento 2 being “open source” – the post-mortem
Feb 23, 2015 @ 10:12:02

On the Magenticians site there's a new post that provides an update of sorts, a post-mortem really, about their opinion of the "open source-ness" of the Magento product and project.

Little less than four months ago, we published an opinion-piece regarding Magento 2 and why we thought it wasn’t really holding up to the mindset of being an open source project. In four months, a lot has changed. [...] Magento 2 was (and still is) being marketed as a new platform which not only refreshes the entire code base, but also improves handling of the community its feedback and involvement. [...] Most of the original critique was therefore that, though by definition Magento 2 is an open source project, all the rest which should naturally come with “being open source”, severely lacked. It is one of our best read articles and linked from a dozen of websites; a timely status update is in its place.

They go on to update some of their original comments and note that things "feel more like open source" with changes including direct pushes to GitHub (not mirrored) and better external communication. They point out a few other smaller things including their developer hub, updated developer documentation and more informative blog posts about the project/project.

tagged: magento opensource postmorten improvements opinion project product

Link: http://magenticians.com/magento-2-open-source-post-mortem

Jordi Boggiano:
Composer 1.0 alpha9
Dec 09, 2014 @ 13:22:10

In this new post to his site Jordi Boggiano talks about the tagging of the 1.0 alpha9 release of Composer and some of the updates that will be coming along with the release.

I tagged Composer's 1.0.0-alpha9 release yesterday and wanted to write down a more detailed update on the highlights of this release. It includes many changes as the last tag was almost one year old. You can also check the full changelog if you want more details.

The updates (so far) include:

  • Requiring packages from CLI just got easier
  • Installing dependencies on the wrong environment is now possible
  • You now get warnings when installing abandoned packages
  • Custom composer commands via scripts
  • Autoloading tests and related files
  • Performance improvements

He also includes a brief note of thanks to all of those that have contributed to the project and for the support from Toran Proxy customers to help pay for the time he spends working on the tool.

tagged: composer v1alpha9 features improvements list toranproxy

Link: http://seld.be/notes/composer-1-0-alpha9

The PHP.cc Blog:
PHPUnit 4.0: Code Coverage Improvements
Mar 10, 2014 @ 10:47:41

The latest version of the popular PHP unit testing tool PHPUnit has officially been released (version 4.0.0) and comes with some nice improvements. In this post to the PHPcc blog Sebastian Bergmann talks about enhancements in one area - code coverage reporting.

One of the highlights of PHPUnit 4.0, which was released last week, is an improvement of the @covers annotation and the addition of the @uses annotation for better code coverage analysis.

He includes a few simple code snippets showing you how the "@covers" annotation has been working and how it can be used in both strict and non-strict modes. He also introduces the "@uses" annotation to define which objects the test is using and how the two interact. He finishes off the post with a mention of the "--strict-coverage" command line flag (or the more general "--strict").

tagged: code coverage improvements phpunit unittest

Link: http://thephp.cc/viewpoints/blog/2014/03/phpunit-4-0-code-coverage-improvements

Symfony Blog:
Symfony2: Getting easier (Parts 2 & 3)
May 06, 2011 @ 09:34:51

Continuing on from his first Symfony2 is getting easier post, Fabien Potencier has two new posts in the series looking at other aspects of the framework that have improved to make developers' lives easier.

In part 2 he talks about a patch that's been applied to help with errors in the autoloading process and throw an exception if something's' not found.

Part 3 talks about an update to help make the pathing shorter on the Doctrine configuration files and the ability to move it to a centralized mapping file in the app/config.

tagged: symfony2 framework features improvements easy

Link:

Zend Developer Zone:
The PAT directory
Jan 22, 2007 @ 15:58:00

In an effort to keep track of some of the lesser seen patches to the core of PHP, the Zend Developer Zone has started a weekly summary that talks about the PAT directory:

The PAT directory contains patches (fixes and improvements for the C source code behind PHP) that have been sent to the internal developers' mailing list by members of the wider PHP community. The mailing list is fairly busy - as are the developers - and patches aren't always noticed by someone able to review and perhaps apply them; this can lead to people repeatedly mailing the same patch to the list in the belief that they're being ignored!

The idea behind the posts is to provide a listing of those patches for those looking for them (including the PHP dev team) until they've been evaluated and moved out of the PAT directory purgatory.

tagged: pat directory patches fixes improvements ignore pat directory patches fixes improvements ignore

Link:

Zend Developer Zone:
The PAT directory
Jan 22, 2007 @ 15:58:00

In an effort to keep track of some of the lesser seen patches to the core of PHP, the Zend Developer Zone has started a weekly summary that talks about the PAT directory:

The PAT directory contains patches (fixes and improvements for the C source code behind PHP) that have been sent to the internal developers' mailing list by members of the wider PHP community. The mailing list is fairly busy - as are the developers - and patches aren't always noticed by someone able to review and perhaps apply them; this can lead to people repeatedly mailing the same patch to the list in the belief that they're being ignored!

The idea behind the posts is to provide a listing of those patches for those looking for them (including the PHP dev team) until they've been evaluated and moved out of the PAT directory purgatory.

tagged: pat directory patches fixes improvements ignore pat directory patches fixes improvements ignore

Link:

Tobias Schlitt's Blog:
Trakbacks on PEARWeb and PEAR Services_Trackback
Feb 15, 2006 @ 07:10:38

Tobias Schlitt has a new post today concerning the improvements that's been made to the PEAR::Services_Trackback package.

I finally found some time and improved the trackback handling on PEARWeb:

  • HTML entities in trackbacks are now decoded before using the bad-word-filter (and the list has been updated)
  • Only 3 trackbacks per 30 minutes will be accepted from a host from now.
  • If both of these criteria do not match, it uses DNSBL and SURBL mechanisms to check trackbacks additionally.

He comments on how it will work now with these improvements and the popularity that the package is garnering...

tagged: PEAR::Services_Trackback improvements bad word limit DNSBL SURBL PEAR::Services_Trackback improvements bad word limit DNSBL SURBL

Link:

Tobias Schlitt's Blog:
Trakbacks on PEARWeb and PEAR Services_Trackback
Feb 15, 2006 @ 07:10:38

Tobias Schlitt has a new post today concerning the improvements that's been made to the PEAR::Services_Trackback package.

I finally found some time and improved the trackback handling on PEARWeb:

  • HTML entities in trackbacks are now decoded before using the bad-word-filter (and the list has been updated)
  • Only 3 trackbacks per 30 minutes will be accepted from a host from now.
  • If both of these criteria do not match, it uses DNSBL and SURBL mechanisms to check trackbacks additionally.

He comments on how it will work now with these improvements and the popularity that the package is garnering...

tagged: PEAR::Services_Trackback improvements bad word limit DNSBL SURBL PEAR::Services_Trackback improvements bad word limit DNSBL SURBL

Link:

PHPBuilder.com:
What's new in PHP 5 and PHP 6
Dec 07, 2005 @ 07:42:00

There's a new post over on PHPBuilder.com today that has a look at "What's new in PHP5 and PHP6" - a look at the present, and forward to the future of this great language.

Most PHP installations out there are still running PHP 4.x. PHP 5.0 has been out a while, and PHP 5.1.1 has just been released. For those of you who haven't yet upgraded, this month I look at some of the changes you can expect to find in the newer versions of PHP, as well as a preview of what you can look forward to in PHP 6.

They go through PHP5 first, mentioning especially the new object model. PHP 5.1.x is briefly mentioned (especially 5.1.1 just released) but not that many new things were added in that edition. From there, the rest is a look at PHP6 and what we can expect from it - items removed/added to the core, the removal of register_globals, and one of the largest developments: Unicode support.

tagged: php5 php5 5.1.1 features improvements issues php5 php5 5.1.1 features improvements issues

Link: