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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Hacking the Fitbit – Emulating a Pager for Twitter DMs!
Jun 17, 2016 @ 10:27:57

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial they've posted from Christopher Pitt showing you how to hack your Fitbit into a pager for Twitter DMs. This essentially turns your Fitbit into a notification system for when someone on Twitter sends you a direct message. It's not overly useful (as you can't send a message) but it is an interesting integration.

I’ve been trying to wake up earlier in the morning. The trouble is that alarms wake everybody up, not just me. To get around this problem, I recently bought the cheapest Fitbit I could find, having learned that they have a neat silent alarm.

The truth is, if I had the cash I would rather have bought an Apple watch. When I got the Fitbit, my programmer brain immediately jumped to the question; “How can I hack this thing?” I ended up learning a bit about Fitbit, OAuth and the Twitter API. I also learned that sometimes it’s better just to get an Apple watch…

His application uses Lumen as the framework and makes connections to both the Twitter and Fitbit JSON APIs. He defines a few routes for the OAuth handling (with callbacks) and a simple view with the "Connect To" links. He shows the creation of applications on both the Twitter and Fitbit side and how to define their keys in your configuration. He sets up the Socialite providers for both connections and a bit of caching to prevent the need for a full pull. He then uses the Fitbit API to set "silent alarms" on your device that are timed to go off immediately when the app detects a new DM on the Twitter stream.

tagged: tutorial fitbit twitter api connect application alarm directmessage

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/hacking-the-fitbit-emulating-a-pager-for-twitter-dms/

TutsPlus.com:
How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0
Apr 29, 2016 @ 11:21:10

On the TutsPlus.com site they've posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter's OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users' accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren't overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you'll need to get your app working with Twitter's OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you'll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

tagged: twitter authenticate user oauth tutorial library flow

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-authenticate-users-with-twitter-oauth-20--cms-25713

Scotch.io:
How To Process Tweets in Real-Time with Laravel
Apr 29, 2016 @ 09:10:16

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial posted showing you how to combine Laravel and the Twitter Streaming API to process tweets in real time inside your application.

This tutorial will show how to use the Twitter Streaming APIs to process tweets in real-time from a Laravel application. There are a variety of use cases for this: perhaps you want to auto-respond to mentions of your company, run a contest via Twitter, or create support tickets when users complain about your product. For this tutorial, we'll build a "featured tweets" widget to display approved tweets on our app's home page.

He starts with an overview of the tools and terms you'll need to know about for the tutorial and a few notes of things to watch out for. He then describes the overall structure of the application (an app just to show the tweets) and links to a repository for the impatient. He then breaks up the rest of the tutorial into several steps:

  • Creating a new Laravel application and installing the Phirehose library
  • Building a "process tweet" job and matching TwitterStream class to use Phirehose and dispatch the job
  • Make the artisan command to connect to the API and the application you created
  • Configure your queue driver and run the processing command
  • Set up a "Tweet" model to connect the application and database table

He finishes the post showing how to make the ProcessTweet Job useful, set up some basic authentication and pass the currently processed tweets into the default "Welcome" view.

tagged: realtime tweet twitter process stream api laravel job queue tutorial

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/how-to-process-tweets-in-real-time-with-laravel#step-11-make-the-processtweet-job-useful

Cal Evans:
What do developers look for when they scan a job ad?
Apr 28, 2016 @ 09:20:15

Recently Cal Evans took an informal survey of fellow Twitter users and asked them what they thought was most important to see in a job ad for a developer position. In this new post he shares some of the results and responses to the question (with a surprising range of answers).

In my book “Culture of Respect” I have a section on writing job ads that will attract developers. I am in the process of revising that chapter, so I thought I would ask the people who actually read the job ads what they look for. The results weren’t that surprising to me. Having read a lot of job ads though, I am guessing that the results will be surprising to some managers out there.

He's embedded the tweets themselves in the post (straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak). Responses touch on subjects like:

  • salary requirements
  • clear definition of duties
  • less "buzz words"
  • well-defined list of technologies they'll be working with

The results are interesting and a definite must read for anyone coming up with job postings for open developer roles in your company.

tagged: developer job ad posting requirement opinion twitter poll

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2016/04/20/what-do-developers-look-for-when-they-scan-a-job-ad/

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Benefits of multiple repositories (Zend Framework)
Apr 26, 2016 @ 12:09:34

Matthew Weier O'Phinney, of Zend and the Zend Framework project, has put together a Storify stream of tweets he posted about some of the benefits of having multiple repositories in a project.

I've seen a number of critiques and write-ups recently about how monolithic repositories are intrinsically better for developing large projects than using a multi-repository approach. In the past year, we went the other direction, splitting our monolithic repository into individual component repositories, each with their own history, tests, and documentation. This is a summary of our experience.

He goes through a list of six different things they learned as a part of splitting up the (Zend) framework into multiple repositories instead of one monolithic one. He includes the contents of each Tweet and a paragraph or two giving it a bit more context and some examples of the changes that were involved. There's also a bit in there about changes they made to the documentation for the project as a result of these repository splits.

I'm quite happy with the switch from a monolithic repository to individual component repositories. I think our code quality is improving dramatically as a result, and I'm excited about the future of these various code bases.
tagged: multiple repository storify twitter zendframework learn process

Link: https://storify.com/mwop/zf-components

Laravel News:
Has your company upgraded to PHP7 yet?
Mar 31, 2016 @ 10:28:34

On the Laravel News site they share the results of a Twitter poll asking developers and companies of they'd switched to PHP 7 yet.

Yesterday I ran a Twitter poll to see how many have moved to PHP7. With 650 votes here are the results. [...] tagged: upgrade php7 company twitter poll results

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/03/company-upgraded-php7-yet/

Community News:
PHP 7 Has Arrived (and Everyone's Talking About It)
Dec 04, 2015 @ 09:58:09

The big news in the PHP ecosystem is the release of the stable version of PHP 7.0.0. This was officially released late yesterday and the response has already been great. Members of the PHP community (and some companies) have also posted about the release too:

These also come along with a whole host of tweets about the PHP 7 release too. If you have a post you'd like to have added to this list and I've just missed it, let me know and I'll drop it in!

tagged: community article blog feedback php7 twitter

Link: http://phpdeveloper.org

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
ReactPHP: HTTP Client
Nov 05, 2015 @ 12:05:14

Cees-Jan Kiewiet has a post on his site focusing on the HTTP client side of the functionality offered by the ReactPHP. In this post he covers the basics of installation and usage with plenty of code examples (and screencasts of it in action).

Aside from a HTTP component ReactPHP also has a HTTP Client component that lets your send out HTTP requests. It is incredibly handy when you need to communicate with for example elasticsearch's REST API, AWS platform through their SDK or the RIPE Atlas API.

He walks you through the simple installation of the library (via Composer) and the code to send a simple request to an example.com domain, returning the HTML contents of the page. He then gets to some more complex examples: sending two requests at the same time, streaming the response body as it arrives and an example based on community feedback - streaming Twitter data. He ends the post with a community example showing the use of the Buzz HTTP client to make simple requests.

tagged: reactphp http client example stream twitter screencast

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/11/reactphp-http-client/

Developer Drive:
How to build an auto-ranking Twitter list with WordPress
Oct 23, 2015 @ 13:55:36

On the Developer Drive site there's a tutorial posted showing how to create a dynamic auto-ranking Twitter list in a WordPress-based application.

My team and I recently built an awesome list template on WordPress that ranks a set of Twitter users based on follower count. It allows a content writer to easily add a list of Twitter handles, and generate a well designed post.

They start with a list of requirements the end result needs to meet including the Twitter information, features it should offer and the resulting output. The rest of the post walks you through every step of the process to get the system set up including:

  • installing the Advanced Custom Fields Pro WordPress plugin
  • Showing an "infinite list" in WordPress
  • Code to loop through the Twitter data
  • using the TwitterAPIExchange PHP library to get Twitter data

All code and steps you'll need to make the system work are included and they've posted a demo so you can see the result first hand.

tagged: autorank wordpress list twitter follower count api interface tutorial

Link: http://www.developerdrive.com/2015/10/how-to-build-an-auto-ranking-twitter-list-with-wordpress/

NetTuts.com:
Programming With Yii2: AuthClient Integration With Twitter, Google and Other Networks
Jun 26, 2015 @ 10:58:36

NetTuts.com has posted the latest part of their "Programming with Yii2" series today, this time with a focus on AuthClient integration allowing for easy interfacing with social services like Google or Twitter.

In this Programming With Yii2 series, I'm guiding readers in use of the newly upgraded Yii2 Framework for PHP. In this tutorial, I'll guide you through integration of the built-in AuthClient support to provide sign-in from third party networks such as Twitter, Google and Facebook.

For these examples, we'll continue to imagine we're building a framework for posting simple status updates, e.g. our own mini-Twitter, using our hello codebase. Use the GitHub links on this page to download the code repository. In Programming With Yii2: Integrating User Registration, I walked through integration of the Yii2-User library for user registration and authentication. In this tutorial, we'll learn how to integrate AuthClient with Yii2-User and override its views.

The tutorial starts off with a look at AuthClient: what it is, what it supports out of the box and which they'll be integrating (Google and Twitter). He shows you how to install the library via Composer and where to configure it, including the keys or secrets needed to connect to the provider of choice. For Twitter, he shows how to register a new "application" on their side and how to hook it into your own application and code. He advocates using an ".ini" file outside of the code to store the service credentials too. Finally he shows how to integrate it with the frontend, including the widget to override the default user login handling.

tagged: programming yii2 authclient twitter google social oauth

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/programming-with-yii2-authclient-integration-with-twitter-google-and-other-networks--cms-23489