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Paul Jones:
Action-Domain-Responder, Content Negotiation, and Routers
July 18, 2014 @ 10:17:57

In his latest post Paul Jones comes back to his proposed application structure, the idea of Action-Domain-Responder, and answers some questions about where content negotiation happens and routing.

While talking about Action-Domain-Responder on the Crafting Code Tour, one of the common questions I got was: "Where does content negotiation happen?" My response was always: "Where does it happen in Model-View-Controller?" That opened up a discussion on how content negotiation is a tricky bit that can go in different places, depending on how you want the concerns separated, and is not a problem specific to ADR.

He goes on and tries to answer the question a bit better, pointing out that "it's a problem for everyone" isn't really good enough to take action on. He works through the different pieces of the ADR pattern, trying to reason out where the right fit is. He suggests a "first filter" on the Controller level, more specifically at the Router level. That's not to say that the Router needs to know about content handling, but it does need to know how to pass that information on.

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action domain responder content negotiation routing

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6020

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Better Understanding Controllers Through Basic Patterns
June 10, 2014 @ 09:53:21

In his most recent post Matthew Weier O'Phinney shares his own spin on the Action-Domain-Responder pattern (from Paul Jones): how the controllers in the ARD setup could be explained as facades.

Paul M. Jones has started an interesting discussion rethinking the MVC pattern as applied to the web, which he has dubbed Action-Domain-Responder (ADR). If you haven't given it a read yet, click the link and do that; this page will still be sitting here waiting when you return. I agree with a ton of it - heck, I've contributed to it a fair bit via conversations with Paul. But there's been one thing nagging at me for a bit now, and I was finally able to put it into words recently. Controllers - Actions in ADR - can be explained as facades.

Matthew starts off by defining the Facade design pattern with a quote from the infamous "Gang of Four" book: simply put, a simplified interface to a complex system. He provides a basic example of a facade that wraps some common steps for inserting and logging data with this kind of simplified interface. He applies this to the ADR pattern's controllers, pointing out that it handles a few complex steps "behind the scenes" common to marshaling and managing the request.

For me, thinking of Controllers and Actions as Facades has an additional benefit: it describes rather complex architectural patterns in terms of basic design patterns. I find the more I can reduce the complexity of a definition, the more likely I will understand and use it correctly.
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controller designpattern adr action domain responder facade

Link: http://mwop.net/blog/2014-06-09-controllers-as-facades.html

Paul Jones:
Refactoring To Action-Domain-Responder
June 06, 2014 @ 10:06:15

Paul Jones has a new post to his site today with a more in-depth look at his proposed "Action-Domain-Responder" design pattern and how to refactor an application, based on some with with the Aura framework, to use it.

The v1 version of the Aura framework includes a controller to handle web assets. The idea for this controller was that an Aura package might have images, scripts, and stylesheets that need to be publicly available, but in development you don't necessarily want to copy them to a public document root every time you change them. [...] That v1 version is a mess. The Controller handles the response-building entirely, and there is no Model separation at all. Let's try refactoring it to an Action-Domain-Responder architecture and clean it up some for a v2 version.

Associated code it just linked to, but he does summarize the steps needed to make the transition: extract the domain logic, move responses to a separate class and rename the controller to an action. He also shows how making this separation makes testing easier and links to examples of tests for each. He finishes the post with two final notes about the refactor. One points out that this method isn't the only way to handle this architecture shift and that the action returns a responder, not a response object.

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action domain responder designpattern architecture refactor

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6006


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