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Sanisoft Blog:
Themes in CakePHP 3, A step by step HowTo
August 21, 2014 @ 11:45:38

On the Sanisoft blog there's a recent post that gives you a step-by-step guide to working with themes in the upcoming version 3 release of the CakePHP framework.

Almost every application I code has themes which either the end user can change or the admin can set or can be changed on the fly. Doing all these things was easy in CakePHP 2.x. With the first alpha release of CakePHP 3.x I was naturally keen to try out how theming worked with V3.

He shows how to convert an existing theme into one that will be compatible with the 3.x version of the framework. He breaks it down into seven steps (well, technically eight) to make it easier to follow along:

  • Step 0: Make the "posts" table
  • Step 1: Bake the model, controller and views for the Posts
  • Step 2: Bake in the "Twit" plugin
  • Step 3: Download and install the Twitter Bootstrap
  • Step 4: Create the "default.ctp" file with the content given
  • Step 5: Make the "index.ctp" template with the given content
  • Step 6: Add the line to the AppController to use the new theme
  • Step 7: Reload and verify the results
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Link: http://www.sanisoft.com/blog/2014/07/21/themes-in-cakephp-3-howto/

PHP.net:
Our modern web theme goes live!
November 21, 2013 @ 09:13:31

If you haven't visited the main PHP.net site in the last day or two, you may have missed it but they've officially released the new look for the site, a more modern look for both the manual and rest of the site.

The PHP web team are delighted to announce the launch of the new web theme that has been in beta for many months. Lots of hard work has gone into this release and we will be continually improving things over time now that we have migrated away from the legacy theme.

From an aesthetics point of view the general color scheme of the website has been lightened from the older dark purple. Lots of borders and links use a similar purple color to attain consistency. Fonts are smoother, and colors, contrast and highlighting have significantly improved; especially on function reference pages. Code examples should now be much more readable.

This new version updates the technologies used as well, including HTML5, Google Fonts and the Twitter Bootstrap. Go take a look at the new version and, if you spot any issues or bugs in it, be sure to report the problem on the PHP bug tracker.

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modern theme redesign release launch

Link: http://php.net/index.php#id2013-11-20-1

NetTuts.com:
How to Create a PyroCMS Theme
May 21, 2013 @ 11:19:25

On NetTuts.com today there's a new tutorial posted showing you how to create a theme for PyroCMS, an open source, PHP-based content management system with a large user base and community.

Like most content management systems, PyroCMS uses front-end themes. Though PyroCMS themes are built a bit differently than what you might be used to from other systems, they're still quite easy to create. They're so easy, in fact, that very little PHP experience is required to assemble them!

He walks through things like the folder structure of the templates directory and how to get started on a custom "Foo" theme of your own. He covers how to lay out the HTML markup for the theme and how you can use partials for the sections of the site. He briefly touches on using multiple layout files and how to use different layouts shown only to mobile devices.

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pyrocms theme tutorial introduction mobile markup patrials

Link: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/how-to-create-a-pyrocms-theme

Dean Clatworthy:
Theming/styling error messages in Symfony 2
August 30, 2012 @ 11:40:40

For the Symfony2 users out there, Dean Clatworthy has a handy tip to help you customize the output of your application a bit more - a method for styling the error messages coming from forms using a custom template.

I spent a large portion of my day today trying to customize the HTML produced by Symfony 2 for form errors. The documentation has a section on how to do this, but for the life of me, I could not make it work. Here is a working, re-usable solution.

His solution involves the creation of a template in your "/Resources/views/Form/" directory that contains a Twig template for the error set output. This is then applied in your view using an additional parameter on the error output tag, including this new template from the "Form" directory. This sort of styling could also be applied if you needed custom elements with their own layouts in your forms as well.

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symfony2 error message theme style twig template tutorial


Designer Daily:
8 useful recipes to improve your WordPress theme
August 19, 2010 @ 12:39:21

On the Designer Daily blog there's a recent post sharing eight simple bits of code you can use in your WordPress site to help make your theme even better.

Blog engine or CMS, call it whatever you want but WordPress is a great tool for web designers. It just get a little hard to use sometimes when you want to do some more advanced things in your theme and you are not a coder. Here are 8 snippets of code that have helped me in recent projects.

The eight snippets they share show how to include:

  • Include post thumbnail in RSS feed
  • Next & Previous Post Titles With Thumbnails
  • Search Specific Category in WordPress
  • List top 10 authors of the blog with their last post
  • Automatically insert content in your RSS feed
  • Display a Comment's Number in a List
  • Display your most commented posts in your blog sidebar
  • Excluding Posts from Your WordPress Feed

Each item links back to the full recipe it came from.

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wordpress theme recipes snippet code


NETTUTS.com:
16 Vital Checks Before Releasing a WordPress Theme
August 05, 2010 @ 13:48:51

On the NETTUTS.com blog today there's a new post that includes a list of sixteen things you need to be sure to check before releasing your WordPress theme.

Releasing a WordPress theme on a marketplace, such as ThemeForest, where the audience is so large and diverse, has some challenges. You cannot test a solution directly with the client. You need to plan in advance for all edge cases, and ensure that your theme is as customizable as possible. If you're inexperienced, chances are that some things will unfortunately slip through the cracks. Luckily for you, we have drawn on our hard-earned wisdom to help you avoid repeating the same mistakes we made.

Among the things they suggest checking are things like:

  • Don't Display Comments on Protected Posts
  • Introduce Right-To-Left Support
  • Make Paginated Entries Work
  • Do not Forget wp_footer() and wp_head()
  • Support Custom Menus
  • Make User-Visible Strings Translatable

Each item on the list comes complete with a description and code (when it's needed).

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Hokuten.net:
A WordPress User's Guide to Drupal
July 28, 2010 @ 08:13:35

If you're a WordPress user and have been wanting to get into Drupal, you should check out this guide on hokuten.net. It gives you information on two main points - installation and theming.

Anyone who has worked with both knows that anything you can do in WordPress, you can do in Drupal, and vice versa. It just takes some elbow grease. [Drupal] is a great thing to learn because of its broad market, but WordPress developers might find some difficulty getting acclimated'"Drupal has a much higher learning curve.

They mention some of the differences between the installation of the two (creating settings files, making additional directories) and a table showing the correlating theme files between the two.

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wordpress user guide drupal install theme


Marco Tabini's Blog:
WordPress, the GPL and cherries on top
July 16, 2010 @ 13:58:44

In case you've missed the latest happenings in the WordPress community, Marco Tabini is here to catch you up. The issue? Licensing of themes for WordPress.

The WordPress community is abuzz with news that the WP Foundation has essentially gone to war with the makers of the Thesis WP theme. The substance of the argument, as I understand it, is that the makers of WordPress claim that themes, since they rely on WP's GPL'ed code to run, must be covered by the GPL as well because they are derivative works. Thesis, on the other hand, is distributed under a commercial license, therefore violating this tenet.

Marco talks about all of the legal implications of the issue and some of the stances each side has taken - WordPress saying that since the code has a foundation on it, it must be covered and the themers saying that's ridiculous. As Marco points out, however, is that the opinions of non-legal professionals doesn't really matter. What matters is what would hold up if this issue were ever pressed into a legal arena. He even includes some suggestions he wishes the WPF would take to heart including to just back off.

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wordpress theme gpl legal wpf issue


Digett.com:
How to Theme the Comment Form in Drupal 6
July 01, 2010 @ 11:26:02

If you're a Drupal user and are looking for a way to change up that standard comment form that comes pre-loaded in the site, you should check out this new post on the Digett blog about the handy hook_form_alter function.

I've grown to have an affinity for Drupal's hook_form_alter function. Truly, modifying a form doesn't have to be as complicated as it may seem. One of the most generic Drupal forms (in my opinion) is the pesky comment form. Out of the box, it comes complete with name, email, homepage, subject, and comment fields.

A few snippets of code included in the post show you how to customize the form by removing some fields, changing labels on others and update the value of one of the buttons - all with a simple implementation of a hook theme.

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drupal theme content form hookformalter tutorial


CatsWhoCode.com:
Best practices for WordPress coding
April 07, 2010 @ 09:24:32

New on the CatsWhoCode blog today there's a post from Jean-Baptiste Jung for all of the WordPress-ers out there with some best practices to help you in your theme or plugin development.

Coding a WordPress theme or plugin can seem to be an easy task at first, but if you want to produce work that is more professional, you have to worry about things such as internationalization and security. In this article, I'm going to show you the best practices I have learned in 3 years of developing with WordPress.

There's six main tips he share including "Think International", "Speed up development using community tools and templates" and "Make use of hooks, actions and filters". Each tip also comes with a few links to some resources where you can find out more details on the technology involved.

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bestpractices wordpress development plugin theme



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