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PHP Town Hall:
Episode 22 The Great Joomla! License Battle of 2014
March 26, 2014 @ 09:59:17

The PHP Town Hall podcast has released their latest episode today - Episode 22, The Great Joomla! License Battle of 2014 with guests David Stanley and Don Gilbert.

This week Ben Edmunds is joined by new guest David Stanley and recurring guest Don Gilbert to discuss the latest Joomla! framework licensing drama. Phil was too busy having a real world life to join us this week, boo! Don does a great job of articulating why switching the Joomla! Framework to an LGPL license would be best for everyone and just might cure cancer. Ben tries to play devil's advocate but eventually can't even maintain the ruse. David talks now and then, mostly about his new found love of the AeroPress.

You can catch this latest episode in a few different ways: either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or you can watch the video of the live recording.

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Link: http://phptownhall.com//blog/2014/03/25/episode-22-the-great-joomla-license-battle-of-2014/

Pantheon Blog:
Please License Your Code
February 26, 2014 @ 13:18:55

In a recent post to the Pantheon blog community member Cal Evans makes one request for the developers out there (PHP and others) - please license your code.

It is wonderful that you have put your code up on GitHub. That is the essence of "Social Coding". However, if you do not put a license on it, you are just teasing developers. In essence, you are saying "See what I made? You can't use it, but I wanted to show you anyhow." Granted, sometimes, developers will use unlicensed code in their projects anyhow, but usually not. Without a proper license, others have no idea what is a permissible use. You wrote it, you own it, you shared it, so let people know they can use it.

He points out that GitHub makes it easy to just throw code up and expose it to the word for use. Unfortunately, due to restrictions put in place by business or technology groups, code without a license simply can't be used. If you're not familiar with code licenses, he links to the Choose a License site that can walk you through the choice via a series of questions.

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Link: https://www.getpantheon.com/blog/please-license-your-code

Community News:
Default JSON Support Licensing Issues in PHP
August 21, 2013 @ 11:13:57

Despite the misleading title, this post on Reddit talks some about a switch that some Linux distributions are making when it comes to JSON support in PHP. They're moving away from the built-in support in favor of including this one.

In a quote from Nikita Popov (a comment on the post) he notes that:

It is true that some Linux distribution switched from json to json-c, but this should be transparent to the user. The standard PHP distribution still ships the JSON extension as it always did. [...] You should all take this chance to switch to PHP 5.5, so you can see that everything works fine and that PHP 5.5 is awesome

He also includes comments from the Remi (Fedora) project about the switch, noting that the end user shouldn't notice any kind of issues. The reasoning behind the switch has to do with licensing and usage issues of the previously built-in extension. You can find out more about that issue in this bug report.

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Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/1ksnzw/php_json_removed_in_php_55

PHPMaster.com:
PhpStorm - Review and Give Away
August 14, 2012 @ 09:37:01

On PHPMaster.com today there's a new article posted that has a review of PHPStorm, an IDE from JetBrains that focuses on providing a great experience for PHP developers and tons of features.

It's said the tool doesn't make the craft - a carpenter can drive a nail into a wooden plank using a hammer, a rock, another plank, or his forehead, but he'll rarely choose anything other than the hammer. [...] I'm talking about using a text editor versus using a full-fledged PHP-dedicated project-oriented IDE for PHP application development. Both will get the job done, but productivity-wise, one is obviously a better choice than the other.

Bruno Skvorc goes through a brief summary of what the editor is about and talks about some of the more notable features including:

  • Being built on Java (good and bad)
  • The IDE being strictly project-oriented
  • Supports the latest PHP version, including 5.4
  • Smart refactoring
  • Good intellisense support

He also mentions the plugin architecture that's included with the product and a few of the more handy plugins available. They're also running a giveaway in collaboration with the PHPStorm folks and are giving out IDE licenses and copies of SitePoint's "PHPMaster: Create Cutting Edge Code" book (rules are included in the article).

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Alexey Zakhlestins' Blog:
PHP-FPM is BSD-licensed now
June 19, 2009 @ 08:45:37

As Alexey Zakhlestins' mentions on his blog, the PHP-FPM project is now under the BSD license with the potential for it to be included in the main PHP distribution.

PHP-FPM is "deciphered" as "PHP FastCGI Process Manager" and is a patch for php to greatly improve FastCGI SAPI usage in production. It adds a bunch of additional features to php's fastcgi such as: easy php-process daemonization (with ability to specify uid/gid/chroot/log-file), safe php-processes restart (without losing requests), custom error-handling and accelerated file-upload support (requires additional support from web-server).

You can find out more about the project from its main site including a FAQ and documentation to get it up and running.

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Stefan Koopmanschap's Blog:
Open source and the times of crisis
March 18, 2009 @ 12:08:59

Time are getting tough out there - a recession is coming around and companies all over are feeling the impact. People are looking for places to save money without having to compromise on functionality and quality. Larger numbers are turning to Open Source communities to provide solutions to fill that gap. Stefan Koopmanschap looks at this trend in his most recent blog post.

As we all know by now, we're living in times of crisis. A recession is hitting us, and it's hitting us hard. Even here in The Netherlands, where at first it seemed we'd be avoiding the biggest hit, we're now getting reports that the recession is the biggest since WWII. The crisis seems to be hitting bigtime in many places. So how does it affect open source and PHP?

Stefan talks about Enterprise resources and their shift in needs away from the "vanity projects" and more into the day-to-day, stable clients. Open Source is giving them a bit of that "fun" back in and allowing them to do more with less - little to no licensing, no vendor lockdown, etc.

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Marcus Borger's Blog:
PHP, Help from Companies & Licenses
March 11, 2009 @ 12:57:34

In this new post to his blog, Marcus Borger looks a companies and their relationship to the PHP project - more specifically Zend and their close ties with PHP and its source.

Why can Zend not simply change the license of the Zend Engine to PHP License? Why do we want this? Because it creates issues with using PHP. And we do not even inform people about it, because we are silent about this fact. So is there a reason why this has not happened already long ago?

He points out the two different sides to consider - how they (Zend and their employees) have contributed to the language and its development and what the license says about ownership of the main engine. Andi Gutmans (of Zend) has made a comment on the post about why the licensing is set up how it is and how it relates to the TSRM library.

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PHP.net:
Manual restructure and license change
July 30, 2008 @ 07:52:53

The PHP.net website has a note posted about the restructuring of the manual

A few weeks ago the manual was restructured to improve navigation and make room for per-extension chapters and usage examples along with improved documentation for object oriented extensions.

Changes were made in the function reference and in the predefined variables and context options/parameters sections as well as information on upcoming features like namespaces, late static bindings and Phar (to be included in PHP 5.3). The manual is now covered by the CreativeCommons Attribution license.

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PHP Women:
Article Competition (Best Practices)
June 24, 2008 @ 09:36:24

The PHP Women have started up an article competition of all of those aspiring technical authors out there. All you have to do to enter is whip up something for their Best Practices section:

To enter the competition all you have to do is submit a short article to our Best Practices forum before the end of July 2008. This area of the site is dedicated to little tips and pointers of how to improve your PHP coding - here is a good example which covers using constants. The competition is open to everyone, regardless of gender, age, location, or any other criteria I haven't thought of.

At the end of July, they'll take their two favorites out of the articles that've been submitted and hand out perpetual licenses for the Zend Studio for Eclipse software to the winners. Remember, you don't have to be female to participate - they're happy to take in content from anyone and everyone. Just sign up and add your topic to the Best Practices forum to submit - it's that easy!

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Matthew Turland's Blog:
PHP, MySQL, and Oracle An Odd Triangle
April 10, 2008 @ 13:04:30

A little while back Matthew Turland posted an interesting item to has blog talking about what he calls the "odd triangle" of PHP, MySQL and Oracle.

In [an article from Maggie Nelson in a blog entry], she remarks on the article being MySQL-oriented and how limited MySQL explain plan support is compared to Oracle. I've had some thoughts in my head for a while that are related to these points, so I finally decided to, knock on wood, put pen to paper.

Matthew talks about things he agrees with (Oracle over MySQL when it comes to hierarchal data and set operators) and some of the things that can make Oracle, with all its power, fall by the wayside. This includes its licensing, the administration costs and some of the recent developments between Sun and MySQL.

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