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Zend:
Turbocharging the Web with PHP 7 (Infographic)
May 14, 2015 @ 09:06:35

In the /r/php subreddit on the Reddit.com site there's a new post that links over to this infographic from Zend sharing some of their own benchmark results for PHP 7 (and comparing it to other versions).

We ran performance benchmarks on popular PHP apps to compare PHP 5.6, PHP 7, and HHVM 3.7.

Their benchmarks includes results for:

  • Magento (1.9)
  • Drupal
  • WordPress
  • Laravel and Zend Framework
  • SugarCRM

They also compare PHP 7 against other languages, showing the execution in seconds when generating a Mandelbrot fractal.

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zend infographic performance benchmark php7 php56 hhvm

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/35vf1y/get_performance_insight_into_the_upcoming_release/

Marc Morera:
Lazy Commands in Symfony
May 08, 2015 @ 08:13:22

In the latest post to his site Marc Morera about the use of "lazy services" with Symfony2. In his examples, he uses a command line application to illustrate his point, but it could apply elsewhere as well.

Since Symfony version 2.4 you can define your controllers and commands as services. This is so useful as long as you need to treat your classes as much decoupled as possible. [...] When we define as lazy a service, this is not instanced when is injected, but only when is accessed. [...] The point here is to define our service intended to work with the model as lazy.

He shows how to implement this kind of "lazy" handling in a command, registering the commands into the services but not creating the instances of them until they're used. He includes some example code showing how this is set up and offers a few tips on the implementation and common issues to think about.

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symfony2 command lazy service register tutorial

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2015/05/08/lazy-commands-in-symfony/

Knp University:
Symfony Service Expressions Do things you thought Impossible
May 06, 2015 @ 12:50:13

The Knp University site there's a new post showing you an interesting thing you can do with Symfony2 service definitions - use more complex expressions to load and supply service dependencies.

[Using] the @= means that you're using Symfony's Expression Language, which let's you mix dynamic logically into your normally-static service definitions. Normally, if you want to inject a repository, you need to register it as a service first, using a factory. And while that's fine (and probably better if you're injecting the factory a lot), using the expression language is well, kinda cool.

They include an example of the compiled container code that would be produced from the example expression. They also show how to use the same expression language to read configuration information and pass it in as an argument to the created service. The show the pull of a configuration setting "email_from_username" and how to inject it via the expression language.

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service expression language tutorial introduction configuration example

Link: http://knpuniversity.com/blog/service-expressions

ServerGrove Blog:
Satis building your own Composer repository
April 30, 2015 @ 11:26:53

Composer has definitely made a huge impact on how PHP packages and libraries are integrated into other applications. Sometimes, though, it makes more sense for you to keep your code internal to the organization rather than have it public where Composer can install it. In this case, using some thing like Satis (a self-hosted Packagist-ish server) makes more sense.

We all love Composer. It changed dramatically the way we build PHP applications, based on small and reusable components, but this creates new challenges, especially when we have a single point of failure (SPO). With Satis, the deployment process can be made robust by adding redundancy in all potential SPOFs (Packagist and GitHub). Let's see how it works.

They start with a brief look at how Composer works for those not familiar, making the connection with Packagist and ultimately the public repository. In the context of the "single point of failure" they talk about Packagist being down and it preventing the install (or deployment!) of your application. Satis is prefect to help prevent this. The article then shows how to install Satis (via Composer, naturally) and how to set up the configuration file to define the repositories. The server is then built and can be run using the built-in PHP server on the port of your choice. They include a screenshot of the end result and a quick example of how to use it via your project's Composer configuration.

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satis tutorial packagist composer local server install configure repository

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/04/29/satis-building-composer-repository/

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Building TCP server daemond with PHP and Rachet
April 13, 2015 @ 10:18:41

Gonzalo Ayuso has a new post to his site today showing how to create a TCP server daemon with PHP with help from the Ratchet toolset. Ratchet is a library that makes it easier to work with WebSockets directly from PHP.

In my daily work I normally play a lot with TCP servers, clients and things like that. I like to use Linux's xinet.d daemon to handle the TCP ports. I've also written something about it. This approach works fine. The problem appears when we call intensively our xinet.d server. It creates one PHP instance per request. It isn't a problem with one request in, for example, 3 seconds, but if we need to handle 10 requests per second our server load will grow. The solution: a dedicated server.

In a setup similar to how Silex registers callbacks, he's created a PHP-based server that listens on whatever ports are defined for incoming connections and processes the data accordingly. He includes several code samples that show it in use, both in simple request handling and more complex configurations based off of a YAML file definition. He ends the post with a method he uses to "emulate" threading in his processing with the help of a Silex app and HTTP requests to hand off the processed and remove the blocking problem PHP introduces.

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tcp server daemon ratchet websocket silex tutorial

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2015/04/13/building-tcp-server-daemon-with-php-and-rachet/

Developer Drive:
40+ tools for writing better PHP
April 01, 2015 @ 10:56:43

The Developer Drive site has posted their top 40+ list of libraries and tools that can help developers write better PHP. Their selections range from templating libraries to request handling and even testing tools.

There are scads of PHP tools available over the internet for php developers, but finding an appropriate PHP tool is quite an arduous task and demands effort and time. Today we've collected 45 handy PHP development tools for developers.

Included in their list are tools such as:

Several of the libraries can be installed via Composer (another tool in their list) but other items are stand-alone software that would need to be set up outside of the application.

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tools list top40 libraries software testing template framework ide server

Link: http://www.developerdrive.com/2015/03/40-tools-for-writing-better-php/

ClanCats Station:
Writing a webserver in pure PHP - Tutorial
March 26, 2015 @ 11:27:42

On the Clancats.com blog there's a recent post showing how to create a web server in pure PHP, an interesting experiment but definitely not recommended for any kind of higher load situation.

Well, this is pretty useless, but it is possible. But again its pretty.. uesless. This tutorial will hopefully help you to better understand how a simple webserver could work and that it's no problem writing one in PHP. But again using this in production would be trying to eat a soup with a fork. So just, .... just don't. Let me shortly explain why this is not a that good idea.

PHP is a scripting language that simply is not really designed for such tasks. A webserver is a long running process which PHP is not made for. Also PHP does not natively support threading ( pthreads ), which will make developing a good performing webserver a really hard task.

He walks you through all the code needed to create the web server (also available on GitHub) by making:

  • A "server" that does the listening for incoming and sends outgoing requests
  • A request object that parses the incoming request and makes header and body content available
  • A response object that allows for the setting of response codes, body content and headers
  • Exception handling for problems encountered during the request/response process

The full code is provided during the process along with explanations of what each part does. There's also a basic introduction to what a typical web server is and how the process of request/response usually flows.

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webserver tutorial version request response server

Link: http://station.clancats.com/writing-a-webserver-in-pure-php

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Top 10 Z-Ray Features to Check Out
March 26, 2015 @ 09:50:23

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post today from Daniel Berman (of Zend) with the top 10 features of Z-Ray to be sure to check out. Disclaimer: Z-Ray is a tool provided by Zend, a part of their Zend Server product.

Necessity is the mother of invention goes the famous saying. For PHP developers, there is no greater need than visibility. But developers today have a tough choice to make as they develop and debug their apps. Either use crude methods such as printing, debugging information, or storing it in a log file, or - use multiple debugging/profiling tools that are awkward and require a lot of work from the developer's side. [...] This article introduces the top 10 features of Z-Ray - an innovative new technology from Zend that makes PHP development a whole lot quicker and easier by giving developers unprecedented insight into their code - and the visibility they need to develop top-notch apps.

Among the items on their Top 10 list are things like:

  • Viewing information about page requests
  • Execution time and memory consumption
  • Showing errors and warnings
  • Viewing functions called during execution
  • Debugging features for mobile apps and APIs

Check out the full post for a list of more features and screenshots/detail on each one.

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zend zray zendserver top10 list features screenshot

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/top-10-z-ray-features-check/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
User Authentication in Symfony2 with UserApp.io
March 19, 2015 @ 09:18:18

On the SitePoint PHP blog Daniel Sipose has written up a tutorial showing you how to use the UserApp.io service to authenticate users for your Symfony2 applications.

UserApp.io is a handy user management tool and API. It provides a web interface to deal with user accounts (and the many features this involves) and an API to hook them into your own web application. The purpose of this service is to make it easier and safer to manage user authentication by not having to worry about that on your own server. It has SDKs and various wrappers for many programming languages and frameworks and the price is affordable. Yes, it comes with a price but you can get started freely with quite a lot of things to play around with.

He makes use of this library (his own creation) and the UserApp.io SDK to hook into Symfony2's own Security component authentication handling. He starts by explaining some of the classes he'll be creating including the form authenticator, a user provider, the logout handler and an custom exception. The full code is included for each as well as the changes you'll need to make to the YAML configuration to hook it all together.

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user authentication symfony2 userappio service tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/user-authentication-symfony2-userapp-io/

Matt Stauffer:
Conditionally Loading Service Providers in Laravel 5
March 12, 2015 @ 10:16:35

Matt Stauffer has a new post to his site showing you how to conditionally load providers in your Laravel-based application with some additional code in the AppServiceProvider.

Since Laravel 5 flattened a lot of the environment-specific structures, much of the configuration that was once stored in different config directories for each environment has now moved into .env files. But one that can't just live in .env is the environment-dependent loading of service providers.

He starts with a look at the normal service provider loading process, using the application configuration and adding them to the "providers" list. This loads them every time a request is made, even if they're not needed. His solution adds some code to the "register" method in the AppServiceProvider class to check the environment (like "production" versus "dev") and loads different providers based on the result.

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condition load service provider laravel5 appserviceprovider register

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/conditionally-loading-service-providers-in-laravel-5


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