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php[architect]:
November 2014 Issue Released - Environments
November 24, 2014 @ 13:22:49

php[architect] magazine has released their latest issue today - the November 2014 edition: "Environments".

In this month's issue, we take a look at the environments that PHP code may travel through.

Articles in this month's issue include:

  • "PHP Engine Explained: an Introduction to the Zend Virtual Machine" (Julien Pauli)
  • "In the Shoes of a Hacker. Creating a Cryptovirus for PHP Apps" (Raul Fraile)
  • "Education Station: PHP on Firefox OS" (Matthew Setter)
  • "Introduction to Building a Programming Language" (Jacob Mather)

There's also all of the columns you know and enjoy covering Laravel Tips, the latest in the PHP community and a retrospective of the php[world] conference. You can pick up either just this issue or a full subscription from the php[architect] website.

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phparchitect magazine nov2014 issue release environments

Link: http://www.phparch.com/magazine/2014-2/november/

Dejan Angelov:
Experimental upgrading to Laravel 5 How I did it
November 24, 2014 @ 12:57:18

In a recent post Dejan Angelov shares the process he went through to upgrade an application to Laravel 5, yet to be released (at least at the time of this post).

Over the past weeks, Taylor introduced many great changes and new features that we'll be able to use in the new version, firstly numbered 4.3 and later 5. According to the framework's six month release cycle, it should had hit stable late this month or in early December. Because of that, I started to play with it and to apply the changes to make my application use it.

However, a couple of days ago, Taylor wrote a blog post on the Laravel's blog saying that because of the importance of this release, the release date will be postponed to January. Considering this, everything you'll read here MUST NOT be applied to applications that are currently in production.

He starts with some of the major differences, including changes in the dependencies required and the removal of the "start.php" file for bootstrapping the application. He talks about the changes in startup and shutdown as well as autoloading. He looks at directory structure changes and the addition of a base namespace. He then gets into how to fix these issues, one at a time, including code and configuration changes that need to be made. This includes updates to the facades, changes for middleware, environment configuration, pagination and routing. There's lots of other changes happening with Laravel 5, so be sure to check out the full post if you're interested in the steps you might need to take when this latest version is released.

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upgrade laravel5 framework change configuration code fix

Link: http://angelovdejan.me/2014/11/22/experimental-upgrading-to-laravel-5-how-i-did-it.html

Laravel News:
The Artisan Files Eric Barnes
November 24, 2014 @ 11:08:54

The Laravel News site has posted their latest interview with a member of the Laravel community (their Artisan Files series). This time they talk with Eric Barnes, the person behind the Laravel Newsletter.

This is a special edition of the Artisan Files series. Over the past few weeks I've had several people ask me to be interviewed and it wasn't something I even considered. For this interview Taylor Otwell volunteered to ask the questions and if you have a question that wasn't asked just leave a comment.

In the interview you'll learn some about Eric including:

  • How he got started in development (and involved with Laravel)
  • What inspired him to start the Laravel Newsletter
  • What applications he considers his "must haves"
  • Three things he thinks make for better programmers
  • His favorite conference talk

...and much more. Check out the full interview for the answers to these and other questions. Also, be sure to sign up for the newsletter to keep up to date on the Laravel community.

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laravelnews interview artisanfiles ericbarnes newsletter

Link: http://laravel-news.com/2014/11/artisan-files-eric-barnes/

Anthony Ferrara:
A Beginner's Guide To MVC For The Web
November 24, 2014 @ 10:42:41

Anthony Ferrara has posted what he calls a beginners guide to MVC for the web, a tutorial that introduces to you the basic concepts behind the Model-View-Controller design pattern and how it should fit in with the SOLID design principles.

There are a bunch of guides out there that claim to be a guide to MVC. It's almost like writing your own framework in that it's "one of those things" that everyone does. I realized that I never wrote my "beginners guide to MVC". So I've decided to do exactly that. Here's my "beginners guide to MVC for the web".

He starts with his first lesson, his most important one really - you don't need "MVC" (the concept, not the pattern...he notes them differently). He then gets into what the MVC pattern actually is and describes each piece and how they fit together. Following that, he talks about "MVC" as a concept and how it's different from MVC, the design pattern (hint: the pattern describes one implementation of the MVC ideals). He talks about the role of state in the MVC structure and how the implementation of the MVC idea is slightly different in the various "MVC frameworks" out there.

There is a very useful lesson that MVC brings: Separation Of Concerns. Meaning that you should separate different responsibilities into different sections of your application. Separation of Concerns is a necessary step in dealing with Abstraction. Instead of latching on to MVC, latch on to abstraction. Latch on to separation of concerns. Latch on to architecture. There are far better ways to architect and abstract user interaction for server-based applications than MVC.
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beginner guide mvc modelviewcontroller designpattern concept solid abstraction

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/11/a-beginners-guide-to-mvc-for-web.html

Mathias Verraes:
Higher Order Programming
November 24, 2014 @ 09:16:43

In his latest post Mathias Verraes looks at "higher level programming" in PHP. Higher order programming is a style of programming that uses components (like functions, modules or objects) as values.
Let's have some fun with higher order programming in PHP. I'll start by showing how to program with Lambdalicious (or λlicious for friends) and introduce the real meat along the way. Don't worry too much about the dark magic that may appear to power some of the features of Lambdalicious. It's on GitHub if you're curious. Just follow along and keep track of all the functions.

He breaks his examples up into (lots of) different examples, each with example code:

  • Atoms
  • Lists
  • Functions
  • Conditionals
  • Loops & List Processing
  • Deduplication
  • Filter and Reduce
  • Functions returning functions
  • Partial Function Application
  • Composition
  • Piping

He finishes off the post talking about Lambdalicious and how, in reality, it's just not suitable for anything useful as written in PHP. The language just doesn't have the right functionality to make it work sufficiently...even HHVM.

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higher order programming example language lambdalicious

Link: http://verraes.net/2014/11/higher-order-programming/

Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 11.24.2014
November 24, 2014 @ 08:02:09

Recent releases from the Packagist:


Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 11.23.2014
November 23, 2014 @ 08:04:06

Recent releases from the Packagist:
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Community News:
Packagist Latest Releases for 11.22.2014
November 22, 2014 @ 08:05:31

Recent releases from the Packagist:

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with FigDice
November 21, 2014 @ 12:19:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series highlighting the FigDice template rendering system. In this latest article Lukas White focuses on FigDice's ability to "pull" data into templates as needed rather than having it injected.

Amongst the many templating systems out there, most work in pretty much the same way; variables are "injected" using some syntax or another, be it curly braces, percentage signs or whatever that library's convention happens to be. They'll usually have basic control structures, such as if...then and, of course, iteration. FigDice, however, takes an altogether different approach. Inspired by PHPTAL - the subject of a future article - it gives the view layer the responsibility of "pulling" in the data it requires, rather than relying on controllers to assemble and "push" it into the templates.

He walks you through the installation of the tool (via Composer) and how to create a basic FigDice view to work with (including template loading). He uses a sample Silex-based application for his examples, making a layout with the FigDice additions to the attributes. He then shows how to make the template for the main index page with a "mute" region for the include logic. He shows how to include this basic template into the view and render it directly as output. Next he shows how to integrate data with the template, pulling in "tweets" from an array dataset via a loop (walk) and a factory to provide the template the data.

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figdice template tutorial series part2 data integration

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-figdice/


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